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CindySoCal
01-19-2007, 01:38 PM
When ever I buy buttermilk I can only find it in a half gallon container. :(

I made some muffins with some of it, now what do I do with the rest of it??:confused:
Any suggestions?? How long does it keep in the fridge once I open it??

TIA :)

sneezles
01-19-2007, 01:45 PM
Any suggestions?? How long does it keep in the fridge once I open it??

TIA :)

Pancakes, salad dressing (ranch), biscuits, scones. As for how long it keeps, I use it well beyond it's sell by date, well beyond it having been opened for 7 days and just before it goes lumpy!:p And you can freeze it!

Hammster
01-19-2007, 01:48 PM
Cornbread!! To go with Chili. :D I buy the Jiffy Corn Muffin Mix and use buttermilk in place of the regular milk called for in the recipe. Yummy.

ETA: I also like the flavor of buttermilk, so I'll drink it instead of regular milk with dinner.

blazedog
01-19-2007, 02:00 PM
I have stopped buying it for that reason in liquid form -- I use the powdered buttermilk for cooking so I can prepare the quantity I need for a recipe.

SugarNSpice
01-19-2007, 02:14 PM
After using the powdered version and then switching to real buttermilk I will never go back. I had no idea how wonderful buttermilk was until I started using the real thing and I actually began tasting it in my food. I could never taste it when using the powdered version. I use it in pretty much everything, here are just some suggestions.

Pancakes
Waffles
French Toast
Marinades for Chicken or Pork
Corn Bread
Tamale Pie (so good!)
Corn Pudding
Cakes
Banana Bread and pretty much all quick breads
Cole Slaw dressing
Salad dressing
Beer Bread

Valerie226
01-19-2007, 02:19 PM
Are you sure you're not missing the quart size? that seems to be the most common. often it's mixed in with the other quarts of assorted dairy products, not next to the half gallon of buttermilk.

I also use it well beyond the sell by date as long as it's not lumpy or turning a different color on the inside of the container. for some reason it stays good much longer than open yogurt does. I'm guessing maybe because you scoop out yogurt with a spoon which contaminates it.

ljt2r
01-19-2007, 02:24 PM
I use it well beyond the exp date as well. Growing up my mom always made the best pancakes with spoiled milk rather than buying buttermilk. While I do prefer buttermilk, I always thought there was a lesson in there somewhere about "spoiled" dairy products and baking. Although I agree that color change is not a good thing. I am never sure about lumps so I also don't use lumpy buttermilk, although I don't really feel as certain of my footing there.

Laura

ljt2r
01-19-2007, 02:26 PM
Oh I also wanted to add if you are looking for a use for your buttermilk that isn't recipe-specific, may I recommend subbing out whatever liquid you use in your favorite yeast bread recipe for buttermilk? I LOVE buttermilk-based bread.

PAMMELA
01-19-2007, 02:46 PM
Oven fried chicken!

funniegrrl
01-19-2007, 02:50 PM
Being a Southern girl, I enjoy -- wait for it -- drinking buttermilk.

It is, admittedly, an acquired taste, but I think it's delicious. Ice-cold is best. It also makes good smoothies.

AngelaM
01-19-2007, 03:09 PM
I wouldn't mind some recipes using buttermilk as well. I have already made blueberry pancakes twice (what I originally bought mine for). I bought an extra container on accident, I think they are a quart each.

PAMMELA
01-19-2007, 03:13 PM
Oven Fried Chicken (http://food.cookinglight.com/cooking/recipefinder.dyn?action=displayRecipe&recipe_id=1536648)

granolagirl
01-19-2007, 03:18 PM
Texas sheet cake!

cookieee
01-19-2007, 03:50 PM
I LOVE LOVE LOVE Buttermilk on my cereal

jimjimmerjim
01-19-2007, 04:06 PM
We had this last night. This is an all time favorite here.

Blue Cheese and Bacon Twice-Baked Potatoes

You can stuff and refrigerate the potato shells up to two days ahead. Add about five minutes to the cook time if starting with cold potatoes. Serve with everything from steak to Thanksgiving dinner.


5 (12-ounce) baking potatoes
1 1/2 cups low-fat buttermilk
1/2 cup (2 ounces) crumbled blue cheese
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh chives
2 tablespoons butter
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
4 bacon slices, cooked and crumbled

Preheat oven to 375.
Bake potatoes at 375 for 1 hour or until tender. Cool 10 minutes or until cool enough to handle. Cut each potato in half lengthwise; scoop out pulp, leaving a 1/4-inch-thick shell. Place potato pulp, buttermilk, and remaining ingredients in a large bowl; beat with a mixer at medium speed until well blended. Spoon about 1/2 cup potato mixture into each of 8 shells (reserve remaining shells for another use). Arrange stuffed shells on a baking sheet. Bake at 375 for 20 minutes or until thoroughly heated.

Yield: 8 servings (serving size: 1 stuffed shell)

CALORIES 264 (25% from fat); FAT 7.4g (sat 3.8g,mono 2.7g,poly 0.4g); PROTEIN 8.5g; CHOLESTEROL 20mg; CALCIUM 117mg; SODIUM 658mg; FIBER 3.8g; IRON 2.3mg; CARBOHYDRATE 41.7g

Cooking Light, NOVEMBER 2005




Barley Yogurt Pancakes


This is from Bob's Red Mill web site.

This recipe can easily be prepared using either yogurt or buttermilk and they are wheat-free.


Ingredients:
1 cup Barley Flour
4 tsp Yeast, Active Dry
2 Tb Honey
1/2 cup Water, warm
1 cup Plain Yogurt
2 Tb Vegetable Oil
1/2 tsp Baking Soda
2 Eggs

Stir yeast into warm water; stir in honey and set aside to proof for 5 minutes.

In a mixing bowl beat the eggs and yogurt (you may substitute yogurt with 1 cup buttermilk) together; add yeast mixture. Add flour and oil; mix until blended.

Place batter in a warm place for 20-30 minutes or until bubbly. It may even stand overnight.

Stir in baking soda just prior to cooking. Pour batter into preheated, oiled griddle and bake until brown and puffy. Turn and cook until done. Serve immediately with desired toppings.

Yield: 10 pancakes

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION:
Each pancake contains Calories 100, Calories from Fat 40, Total Fat 4.5g, Saturated Fat 1g, Cholesterol 40mg, Sodium 95mg, Total Carbohydrates 12g, Dietary Fiber 2g, Sugars 5g, Protein 4g.

This is a recipe I want to try from the Barley Foods site that Bob posted a link to. If you haven't been there and like barley, it is worth a visit. Thanks Bob.

Barley Pumpkin Waffles

1/2 cup warm water (105 F to 115 F)
1 package (1/4 ounce) active dry yeast
3 tablespoons granulated sugar, divided
1-3/4 cups all-purpose wheat flour
1/2 cup barley flour
2 tablespoons pumpkin pie spice
1 tablespoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
2 cups low-fat buttermilk
1/2 cup prepared solid pack pumpkin
2 tablespoons butter, melted

Combine water and 1 teaspoon sugar in small bowl. Sprinkle yeast over water; let stand 5 minutes or until surface bubbles to show yeast is working. Combine flours, remaining sugar, pumpkin pie spice, baking soda and salt in large bowl; set aside. In small bowl, combine buttermilk, pumpkin and melted butter. Stir liquid ingredients and yeast mixture into dry ingredients until well blended. Cover batter and refrigerate overnight. To prepare waffles, heat waffle iron. Pour in 1/2 to 1 cup batter, according to the size of the waffle iron. Bake until waffles are done. Makes 4 servings.

Per serving: calories 425, protein 13g, carbohydrates 76g, fiber 5g, fat 8g, cholesterol 20mg, sodium 1718mg.

SugarNSpice
01-19-2007, 04:31 PM
I thought I was being adventurous when I put buttermilk in a smoothie, but cookieee and funniegrrl are competing in the XGames of buttermilk! :D

GingerPow
01-19-2007, 06:15 PM
Homemade, from scratch Buttermilk Pancakes or Buttermilk Biscuits. Ditto on the Cornbread too! I also like to use buttermilk in muffin batter, especially blueberry.

Buttermilk marinated Fried Chicken is incredible. Here's a link to a recipe - "Picnic Basket Buttermilk Fried Chicken" - http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_23504,00.html?rsrc=search

Here are some links to recipes using buttermilk:
http://homecooking.about.com/library/archive/blmisc46.htm

ljt2r
01-19-2007, 06:19 PM
The new King Arthur Whole Graining Baking cookbook has a yummy oat scone recipe that uses buttermilk. Here's the thread:

http://community.cookinglight.com/showthread.php?t=99973

deniseannsc
01-19-2007, 10:11 PM
Some of my favorites other than the ones already listed are:

Buttermilk-Brined Pork Chops - CL/Oct '04
60 Minute Southern Rolls - ?? old recipe
Baked Buttermilk Chicken - Mrs. Wilkes Boardinghouse Cookbook
Oats 'n Wheat Blueberry Muffins - Best Muffins & Quick Breads
Pecan-crusted Tilapia - CL/Jan '03
Gooey Apple Sheet Cake - BB/valchemist

I use the real thing. I bought the powdered to try, but it's still in my cabinet after months and months. I just can't bring myself to use it.

CindySoCal
01-19-2007, 11:59 PM
Thank-you, thank-you, thank-you !
I don't know where to start..........

Soooooooo many recipes to add buttermilk to, I may be buying it EVERY week ! LOL :D
I also didn't realize how long you could keep it, I think once it starts turning to yogurt I'll throw it out :)

thanks again !

PamN
01-20-2007, 07:27 AM
Speaking of yogurt, I frequently substitute yogurt, thinned with milk to make the right consistency, for buttermilk in recipes. The Barley Yogurt Pancakes jimjimmerjim posted suggests this, but I don't think you have to wait for a recipe to suggest it specifically for the substitution to work. So if you don't want to buy a half gallon and go on a buttermilk binge, you can still make the recipe successfully. ;)

Tizzylish
01-20-2007, 08:10 AM
Buttermilk mashed potatoes.............YUM! :D


* Exported from MasterCook *

Buttermilk Mashed Potatoes

Recipe By :
Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1 1/4 pounds Yukon Gold potato or Yellow
Finns, peeled and cut into
2-inch chunks if large
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
3/4 cup buttermilk -- warmed (not hot)
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
Freshly ground black pepper

Place the potatoes and 1 teaspoon of the salt in a medium saucepan, add enough water to cover, and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to moderate and simmer until the potatoes are tender when pierced with a fork, about 45 minutes. Drain, reserving 1/4 cup of the cooking water.

Return the potatoes to the pan and set over low heat, uncovered, for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, to let the potatoes dry out a little (too much moisture will dilute their flavor). For the smoothest potatoes, pass them through a food mill. For a slightly coarser puree, mash them with a potato masher or fork or use a hand mixer. Beat the buttermilk into the potatoes with a wooden spoon until thoroughly incorporated. If you prefer even creamier potatoes, add a little of the reserved cooking liquid. Beat in the butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt, and plenty of pepper. Serve at once, or keep the potatoes warm, covered, in a double boiler over hot water for up to 1 hour.

In Advance: You can make the potatoes up to 3 hours ahead. About 20 minutes before serving, warm them in a double boiler, stirring frequently, until hot.

Makes 4 servings.


A New Way to Cook
January 2002
Sally Schneider



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 161 Calories; 3g Fat (18.7% calories from fat); 5g Protein; 27g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 9mg Cholesterol; 762mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Non-Fat Milk; 1/2 Fat.

Angelina
01-20-2007, 08:21 AM
I love drinking it...nothing more cool and refreshing on a hot summer day! When I was a kid in Holland, that was my favorite thing. We could never find it in Italy. :)

Angela

sparrowgrass
01-20-2007, 08:45 AM
Buttermilk and brown sugar makes a wonderful moist coffeecake.

Cowboy Coffee Cake

2 1/2 cups flour
1 3/4 cups brown sugar
1 tsp nutmeg
2 tsp cinnamon
3/4 cup salad oil

Stir together until it forms rough crumbs. Set aside 3/4 cup for topping.

Stir in
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp baking powder

Add
1 cup buttermilk
1 egg

Batter will be lumpy--don't worry.

Pour into greased 10 inch square pan, and sprinkle reserved crumbs on top. Add half a cup of chopped nuts or coconut if you like.

Bake at 325 for 40-45 minutes.

Canice
01-20-2007, 10:09 AM
Half gallon?! Good heavens, who would ever need that amount?? Several of the stores I shop at sell the half-PINT containers for around 40 cents...and I still can't use it all up (unless it's for chicken). Lots of creamy greens soups call for it, so that would be an option too.

mrswaz
01-20-2007, 11:59 AM
Buttermilk Oatmeal Bread

2 teaspoons instant yeast
2 cups bread flour
1 1/2 cups white whole wheat flour
1/2 cup rolled oats
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
1 1/4 cups lukewarm water
1/2 cup buttermilk

* Stir together the flours, oats, yeast, sugar and salt in a large bowl; add the butter, buttermilk and yeast mixture and beat with an electric mixer until the ingredients are well blended.
* Turn out the dough onto a floured surface and knead for about 5 minutes or until the dough is smooth and elastic.
* Lightly oil a large bowl and transfer the dough to the bowl; cover with a tea towel and let the dough rise in a warm place until it is doubled in size, about 1 hour.
* Punch the dough down and let it rise again, covered with a tea towel, for 45 minutes.
* Preheat oven to 350 and oil a 9x5x3-inch loaf pan.
* Punch the dough down again and place it in the loaf pan; bake for 35-40 minutes or till the loaf pulls away from the side of the pan and loaf sounds hollow when you thump it.

ljt2r
01-20-2007, 12:11 PM
Speaking of buttermilk, I have a question about it: I have been making that Best Bread in the World recipe that was posted on one of the threads a week or so ago. It is basically an oatmeal honey bread. ANyway, I have taken to replacing some of the water with buttermilk, which produces an awesome result. The water is boiling, so as to soften the oats. How long should I wait before adding the buttermilk? On the one hand, the sooner I get it in there, the more liquid there is to soften the oats (and the greater percentage of buttermilk I can use therefore). On the other hand, I didn't know if it would curdle like cream--so I have been waiting until the mixture cools (and therefore using less buttermilk than I want to). Any ideas? Does buttermilk curdle? Can I add it to boiling water? What happens when you heat it?

TIA :D Laura

sneezles
01-20-2007, 12:50 PM
Does buttermilk curdle? Can I add it to boiling water? What happens when you heat it?

TIA :D Laura

You should be able to actually boil it with the water without harming the buttermilk. There's a very old recipe for boiled buttermilk icing. I'd bring it slowly to a boil if you are using low-fat buttermilk but it shouldn't curdle. I actually use scalded buttermilk for mashed potatoes with no problem.

ETA: I did find some sites where they don't recommend boiling the buttermilk because of curdling but it's not something I've experienced.

SugarNSpice
01-20-2007, 01:04 PM
(On the subject of curdling)

I tried to use low fat buttermilk to make rice pudding and when I brought my liquids to a boil the buttermilk immediately curdled. Sneezles, you said you never experienced curdling, was my buttermilk on the old side and that is why it curdled instantly? Or was it b/c I used low fat buttermilk?

ljt2r
01-20-2007, 01:12 PM
(On the subject of curdling)

I tried to use low fat buttermilk to make rice pudding and when I brought my liquids to a boil the buttermilk immediately curdled. Sneezles, you said you never experienced curdling, was my buttermilk on the old side and that is why it curdled instantly? Or was it b/c I used low fat buttermilk?

I thought buttermilk was always low or no fat. :confused: :confused: Am I wrong?

Thanks for the rest of the advice, I am going to try slowly heating it next time so as to use even more. I just don't see any reason to use something tasteless like water when I could use butermilk. :p

Laura

jimjimmerjim
01-20-2007, 01:26 PM
tried to use low fat buttermilk to make rice pudding and when I brought my liquids to a boil the buttermilk immediately curdled. Sneezles, you said you never experienced curdling, was my buttermilk on the old side and that is why it curdled instantly? Or was it b/c I used low fat buttermilk?

The answer to that was on America's Test Kitchen today.

The buttermilk is so low in fat that the proteins separate with heat (or something like that-I'm no chemist).

What they said to do was to use room temperature buttermilk, and mix it with melted butter. The addition of the fat from the butter keeps it from separating.

Sort of defeats the point though, using a low fat product but you have to add butter to it.

SugarNSpice
01-20-2007, 01:42 PM
Thanks for the info! Did they say how much butter was needed?

sneezles
01-20-2007, 01:53 PM
I guess it's because I always have butter in with the buttermilk while heating it that I've never experienced curdling. I have also never taken it to a rapid boil.

ljt2r
01-20-2007, 02:07 PM
Well there is butter in my bread, so I will just melt it with the buttermilk. Thanks for all the help....

jimjimmerjim
01-20-2007, 02:21 PM
Thanks for the info! Did they say how much butter was needed?

Here is the recipe they were doing on ATK this morning when they were talking about buttermilk and heat.

Buttermilk Mashed Potatoes
from the Episode: Dinner on a Dime

To achieve the proper texture, it is important to cook the potatoes thoroughly; they are done if they break apart when a knife is inserted and gently wiggled (see photo below). Buttermilk substitutes such as clabbered milk do not produce sufficiently tangy potatoes. To reduce the chance of curdling, the buttermilk must be at room temperature when mixed with cooled melted butter.

Serves 4
2 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes , peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks
Table salt
6 tablespoons unsalted butter (melted and cooled)
2/3 cup buttermilk , at room temperature
Ground black pepper


1. Place potatoes in large saucepan; add cold water to cover by 1 inch and 1 tablespoon salt. Bring to boil over high heat, then reduce heat to medium and simmer until potatoes break apart when paring knife is inserted, about 18 minutes. Drain potatoes and return to saucepan set on still-hot burner.

2. Using potato masher, mash potatoes until a few small lumps remain. Gently mix melted butter and buttermilk in small bowl until combined. Add butter/buttermilk mixture to potatoes; using rubber spatula, fold gently until just incorporated. Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper; serve immediately.

photokel
01-20-2007, 08:13 PM
Oh I also wanted to add if you are looking for a use for your buttermilk that isn't recipe-specific, may I recommend subbing out whatever liquid you use in your favorite yeast bread recipe for buttermilk? I LOVE buttermilk-based bread.

A couple of things to keep in mind when substituting buttermilk for water or plain milk in bread recipes:

(1) Add about 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda to neutralize the acidity of the buttermilk.

(2) The texture of your bread will be different -- more tender, and the crust will be very soft.

(3) The flavour of your bread will have a distinct "tang" to it.

Enjoy your bread!

ljt2r
01-20-2007, 09:55 PM
A couple of things to keep in mind when substituting buttermilk for water or plain milk in bread recipes:

(1) Add about 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda to neutralize the acidity of the buttermilk.

(2) The texture of your bread will be different -- more tender, and the crust will be very soft.

(3) The flavour of your bread will have a distinct "tang" to it.

Enjoy your bread!

Peter Reinhardt in The Bread Baker's Apprentice says that water, milk and buttermilk are all interchangeable options for his white sandwich bread--and he never suggests adding baking soda when choosing buttermilk. Nor did I need to when I added it to a honey oat bread. So while I agree that it produces a different bread (obviously--that's why I like it, bc I like the difference :D ) I am not certain you need to add baking soda in a yeast bread when using buttermilk. What problem does the acidity cause if you don't?

Sararwelch
01-21-2007, 08:40 AM
When I have leftover buttermilk, I made CL's buttermilk pancakes (calls for a cup I think) and CL's buttermilk biscuits. I also sometimes substitute buttermilk for other ingredients in recipes like yogurt or sour cream.

photokel
01-21-2007, 04:40 PM
Peter Reinhardt in The Bread Baker's Apprentice says that water, milk and buttermilk are all interchangeable options for his white sandwich bread--and he never suggests adding baking soda when choosing buttermilk. Nor did I need to when I added it to a honey oat bread. So while I agree that it produces a different bread (obviously--that's why I like it, bc I like the difference :D ) I am not certain you need to add baking soda in a yeast bread when using buttermilk. What problem does the acidity cause if you don't?

Oh, I do love Reinhardt's book! If you like that one you might also like Rose Levy Beranbaum's "The Bread Bible." I received Beranbaum's book for Christmas and have made a number of recipes from it so far, all of which have been great.

The only thing that could happen if you substitute buttermilk for other liquids in a bread recipe is that the acidity of the buttermilk may cause your bread not to rise as much as you expect. By adding 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda, you can be assured of a nicely risen bread. For a reference, I include a paragraph from Leith's Techniques Bible, page 202: "The acidity from the buttermilk combines with the alkaline bicarbonate of soda to produce carbon dioxide, which raises the baked goods."

If you substitute buttermilk for another liquid in your bread recipe, and you're not happy with the results, try adding the baking soda and see if that helps.

Enjoy your bread!

kabs
01-21-2007, 06:04 PM
Buttermilk mashed potatoes.............YUM! :D


* Exported from MasterCook *

Buttermilk Mashed Potatoes

Recipe By :
Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1 1/4 pounds Yukon Gold potato or Yellow
Finns, peeled and cut into
2-inch chunks if large
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
3/4 cup buttermilk -- warmed (not hot)
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
Freshly ground black pepper

Place the potatoes and 1 teaspoon of the salt in a medium saucepan, add enough water to cover, and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to moderate and simmer until the potatoes are tender when pierced with a fork, about 45 minutes. Drain, reserving 1/4 cup of the cooking water.

Return the potatoes to the pan and set over low heat, uncovered, for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, to let the potatoes dry out a little (too much moisture will dilute their flavor). For the smoothest potatoes, pass them through a food mill. For a slightly coarser puree, mash them with a potato masher or fork or use a hand mixer. Beat the buttermilk into the potatoes with a wooden spoon until thoroughly incorporated. If you prefer even creamier potatoes, add a little of the reserved cooking liquid. Beat in the butter, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt, and plenty of pepper. Serve at once, or keep the potatoes warm, covered, in a double boiler over hot water for up to 1 hour.

In Advance: You can make the potatoes up to 3 hours ahead. About 20 minutes before serving, warm them in a double boiler, stirring frequently, until hot.

Makes 4 servings.


A New Way to Cook
January 2002
Sally Schneider



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 161 Calories; 3g Fat (18.7% calories from fat); 5g Protein; 27g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 9mg Cholesterol; 762mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Non-Fat Milk; 1/2 Fat.


I just wanted to pop in to say thank you for this thread and especially this recipe! I made these buttermilk mashed potatoes tonight to go with a roasted sticky chicken and they are the best mashed pots I've ever made! (Now, I have to add that I rarely make mashed potatoes because I've never been very good at making them. They are always heavy and gluey! :( ) But, after tonight I may have found my new method: the food mill! :D Kind of a pain, b/c of the clean-up factor, but worth if if my potatoes will turn out this light and fluffy every time. I also curdled the buttermilk the first time because I brought it to a boil by accident, but gently warmed the buttermilk the second time and no curdling!

Thanks, Tizzylish!

golden1225
01-22-2007, 06:47 AM
Being a Southern girl, I enjoy -- wait for it -- drinking buttermilk.

Me, too! I grew up drinking buttermilk with my popcorn - mmm! I also love it in a big glass with cornbread crumbled into it. I think I could eat that all day long until I explode!

A fabulous dessert I made often uses 1 can of crushed pineapple, buttermilk and sugar to taste. Put in a dish and freeze until firm. So refreshing on a hot summer evening!

And then of course what everyone else says...in place of your liquid in any bread or muffin recipe.
:) :) :)

funniegrrl
01-22-2007, 08:50 AM
I also love it in a big glass with cornbread crumbled into it.

My mother and grandmother used to eat this all the time. I never did as a kid, but I think I'd enjoy it now. Just a southern version of milktoast, when you think about it, but with more oomph.

golden1225
01-22-2007, 10:13 AM
[QUOTE=funniegrrl;1160301Just a southern version of milktoast, when you think about it, but with more oomph.[/QUOTE]

My mom always made us milk toast when we were sick; her version is very sweet. She butters bread, puts a good dousing of sugar on top, then puts under the broiler until it's all golden brown and bubbly. Immediately put that in a bowl and pour milk over - yummmmmmmmmmmm! I haven't had that in a long time, but I think I might just have to make some! ;) That's our southern version of milk toast!
:) :)