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View Full Version : Rival Crockpot--too hot??



gobluem82
05-02-2007, 06:53 PM
I recently bought a Rival Smart Pot because I wanted an oval crockpot to supplement my 25-year-old one, and I liked the sleek, stainless steel look. I've used it a couple of times since then, and it operates a lot hotter than my old one. The low setting is equal to or higher than the hot setting on my old one; I'd hate to see what would happen if I set my new one on "high". I'm concerned that some dishes may end up terribly overcooked if I start them in the morning before I leave for work. Has anyone else had the same problem?

AZgal
05-02-2007, 07:36 PM
I recently purchased a new Rival crock pot also. It's a larger crock pot and the crock is removable. I purchased it as a replacement for my original crock pot which was a wedding gift (39 years ago :) ) It's not the Smart Pot version but I've experienced the same thing you describe. So far, I've just had to be aware and shorten cooking times. I wonder if it's just the improvements that have been made over the years??:confused:

madpots
05-02-2007, 07:41 PM
I have the same problem. Unless I need a larger pot I use my old one. The new one, even on low, seems to boil. I read somewhere that you have to keep it at a higher degree for health reasons. I cook my pork for barbecue about 10 hours at 225 and in 40 years nobody has gotten sick! Except for eating too much!

patissac
05-02-2007, 08:27 PM
I too have just recently bought a Rival crock pot and if you put that thing on Low for a couple of hours it will burn :( I guess the new modifications really have kicked it up a notch! I too would hate to see what it does if you set it on High:eek:

Hammster
05-02-2007, 08:56 PM
Low used to be just around 140 degrees F which is the minimum hot temperature for safe cooking. So, all crock pots had to raise their minimum temperature. I don't recall what the low temp had to become. I've also had to adjust my cooking times since I have a newer Rival.
Regarding the scorching on the sides of the crock. I have seen the liquids kind of stick a bit to the crock, but not really scorch. I always soak my crock overnight after using it and it cleans very easily with hot soapy water the next day. Be sure to add only hot water to the crock if the crock is still hot when adding the soap and water for soaking. Cold water into hot crock = cracked crock. :eek:

margeslp
05-03-2007, 05:29 AM
I get scorching/browning of the food on one side of my new Rival CP if I use hi. I'm not a frequent CP user. Most of the time I use it on low and don't get the problem. I use the Reynolds liners when the ingredients will probably leave a crust needing an soak-job. Hammster's comments give an interesting historical background. Sometimes we leave the issue as "they just don't make them the way they used to."

peachesncream
05-03-2007, 05:36 AM
Rival has bumped up the temperatures in their crockpots (so have other manufacturers). It's a shame, because the old ones cooked so well, and you actually could leave them on all day without burning the food.

My advice is, if you still have an older model, hold onto it! I have an old upright one and I use it all the time.

testkitchen45
05-03-2007, 06:45 AM
I get scorching/browning of the food on one side of my new Rival CP if I use hi. I'm not a frequent CP user. Most of the time I use it on low and don't get the problem. I use the Reynolds liners when the ingredients will probably leave a crust needing an soak-job. Hammster's comments give an interesting historical background. Sometimes we leave the issue as "they just don't make them the way they used to."

I get the same problem (scorching on the sides), esp. if the ingredients are at all sugary. Where do you find the Reynolds liners? Once I saw them advertised, I wanted them, but can't find at grocery, Target, Wal-Mart. Maybe an oven bag would be just as good.

I think you have to watch crockpot recipes, too. My older recipes frequently say to cook, for ex, chicken for 6 hrs on low. Newer recipes, such as in Not Your Mother's Slow-Cooker Cookbook (a BB-recommended book that I really like), have shorter cooking times. If more recent crockpots are running hotter, that would explain why my older recipes produce rubber chicken.

gobluem82
05-03-2007, 10:38 AM
Well, it's good to know that I'm not the only one with this problem. Shorter cooking times are all well and good unless one is at work during the day, and isn't that the reason that many of us have crockpots to begin with? :confused: I believe my Smart Pot has some kind of a delay feature, but I'm somewhat reluctant to let things sit at room temperature for safety reasons. Maybe if I have everything refrigerated beforehand there wouldn't be as much of an issue. If anyone has other suggestions as to how to get around that problem, I'd appreciate it.

DeeK
05-03-2007, 12:38 PM
Even on the low temp. mine gets boiling. It hisses and spits liquid out the top. I know it's probably not recommended, but I put the lid on a little catty-wumped to keep the temps down just a tad.

So far we haven't died of food poisoning. Of course, you'd have to stay home and keep and eye on the thing this way. I don't think it would be safe to leave it alone with the top propped up.

margeslp
05-03-2007, 03:08 PM
[QUOTE=testkitchen45;1210948]I get the same problem (scorching on the sides), esp. if the ingredients are at all sugary. Where do you find the Reynolds liners? Once I saw them advertised, I wanted them, but can't find at grocery, Target, Wal-Mart. Maybe an oven bag would be just as good.


Originally, I only found them in the larger supermarkets ad they were standing out in a separate stand the way they place baking equipment before Xmas. Now I look carefully to find them and they are with other Reynolds products near the Reynolds Release. I usually buy a few at once since I am afraid I won't find them when I need them.
I think they are a little pricy vs. elbow grease but keep one box on hand for me. I buy a bunch of them for stocking stuffers at Xmas. Every lady relative or friend of mine get a product for Xmas- few years ago it was Reynolds Release. I figure they are a treat for any gal (also my sons)

AZgal
05-03-2007, 08:30 PM
Rival has bumped up the temperatures in their crockpots (so have other manufacturers). It's a shame, because the old ones cooked so well, and you actually could leave them on all day without burning the food.

My advice is, if you still have an older model, hold onto it! I have an old upright one and I use it all the time.

Yeek!:eek: I was so proud of my new crock pot, I trashed the old one!

Max Sutton
05-04-2007, 07:17 AM
I'm so glad that this topic was posted. I recently bought a larger Rival crockpot. When I cooked a beef stew I noticed that the slow-cooker liner looked singed. I thought that I had done something wrong.

I went through my recipe box and shaved off a few hours on the crockpot recipes.

Thanks for posting this.

librarygirl
05-04-2007, 10:20 AM
Ditto on the problems stated and one more annoying problem:
I brought my Rival slow cooker to work (not dropping it or anything), brought it home, and then it did not work the next time I tried to use it at home! What a waste of money! Thankfully, I did not throw away my old slow cooker.

Carol

peachesncream
05-04-2007, 05:33 PM
Another idea is to buy an older model (1970's vintage) at a garage sale or on EBay.

TKay
05-04-2007, 05:55 PM
I also shorten my cook times. Same thing with my oven. I just know that things will be cooked quickly. The temp is set right, but I think the thing is just efficient because it's a newer model.
That's one of the issues I have with my Rival crockpot. Not that it gets too hot, but that it's timing selections are limited. I wish I could customize the cook times for 2 hours or whatever. I don't have that model.

AZgal
05-05-2007, 07:31 AM
Another idea is to buy an older model (1970's vintage) at a garage sale or on EBay.

That's a great idea! I'm sure DH will think I've absolutely lost my mind! He questioned me about throwing away my old crock pot because "but it still works!" :D :D