PDA

View Full Version : Aluminum disposable baking dishes



Canice
01-13-2009, 12:58 AM
I'm pretty sure my fear of them is irrational, and I need someone to confirm.

Setting aside the notion of putting anything acidic in them, do they effect the flavor, cooking time, consistency, etc of what you bake in them? What about browning the bottoms and edges? It's a general question, but at the moment I'm thinking of the casserole I'll make tomorrow night: brown rice and chicken and vegetables in a Parmesan sauce. I have visions of it either taking on a metallic taste or getting dark brown and crusty on the bottom and sides before warming through the center. Any justification, or do they work out fine?

TIA

clairea
01-13-2009, 07:58 AM
It will be fine for a casserole like that. I wouldn't recommend doing what DH did Sunday night. He roasted a chicken (his first!) in one, squeezed a lemon over the chicken, and then put the lemon in the cavity. In the bottom of the pan there was a perfect black imprint of the shape of the chicken:eek:

If you are uncomfortable with the aluminum (I have lots of irrational fears too;) ), Glad makes a line of ovenware similar to its gladware containers. I have used those as "disposable" containers in the past too. I'm back using the aluminum now, because I'm unsure about heating the plastic in the Glad containers.

kwormann
01-13-2009, 08:02 AM
Good morning :)

I have been known to use them when I was taking a dish someplace and it wasnt worth it to try to bring it back - doesnt have the same heat conductivity, but it serves the purpose...I also use them to roast turkey, as I dont have a permanent roasting pan. :)

Hammster
01-13-2009, 08:08 AM
I use the aluminum pans for my New Orleans bread pudding and for the Gulliver's Corn and they both work out great in those. They don't affect the flavor and the cooking times aren't off by much, if at all. For the larger pan that I do the bread pudding in, I always put the pan on a heavy cookie sheet as I don't like the way the aluminum pans flex so easily when they are full of something. The aluminum pan on the cookie sheet makes the whole thing a lot more stable and easier to handle going in and out of the oven.
I have used them for roasting turkeys, and other large pieces of meat, with good success. Again setting the pan on a cookie sheet for support.
I echo the no acid (or very minimal acid) use with those pans. The acid (citrus, tomato sauce, etc..) seems to leach the aluminum and makes those black marks. Perhaps it's no biggie, but there is nothing that I've been able to find that says it's not a problem so I'll go on the safe side for now until someone tells me different (with credible data to back it up, please). :D

sneezles
01-13-2009, 09:10 AM
Hmmm, you mean I'm not suppose to make lasagne or baked ziti in those pans? Has anyone told Stouffer's? Granted I wouldn't serve chili out of one...they're not sturdy enough...but if I'm going to a pot-luck I'd use one in a heartbeat.

KristiB
01-13-2009, 09:22 AM
I've also used them for roasting birds and for potlucks. Newver noticed it added any metallic flavor.

faygs
01-13-2009, 11:59 AM
I've occasionally used them for foods made with both tomatoes (lasagna, ziti) and lemons (roast chicken) and never noticed a problem.

Hammster
01-13-2009, 12:55 PM
Hmmm, you mean I'm not suppose to make lasagne or baked ziti in those pans? Has anyone told Stouffer's?

You, and Stouffers, can do whatever you like. ;) I'm just not going to do it. I've seen the black pitting and it's not a good thang IMO. :D

LakeMartinGal
01-13-2009, 01:34 PM
What about lining the pan with parchment? Do you think that would solve the pitting problem?

Hammster
01-13-2009, 02:07 PM
What about lining the pan with parchment? Do you think that would solve the pitting problem?

Seems like a good idea, Kay. :)

Stephanie-Oh
01-13-2009, 02:52 PM
I've used these for lasagna for years and have never had a "pitting" or "spotting" problem. Mostly we use them for lg grp cooking, like lasagna for church dinners or "to give" pans. Just give them a good spray with Pam or other cooking spray and you should be fine. The aluminum foil used to cover the lasagna is another thing altogether. I have seen corrosion spots on the foil so I always cover lasagna with plastic wrap or parchment paper first then foil. And I always remove the plastic wrap before baking. I've known some who leave plastic on during baking, swearing the plastic wrap "evaporates" and so you arent eating it but I just can't see doing it:eek::eek:.....Steph

gertdog
01-13-2009, 06:59 PM
I've known some who leave plastic on during baking, swearing the plastic wrap "evaporates" and so you arent eating it but I just can't see doing it:eek::eek:.....Steph

Ew! Ew ew ew. They think it "evaporates" ????!! That is just so... yuck.

Anyhow- I have used the Hefty EZ-Foil pans many times for pasta casseroles with tomato-based sauces and never saw any pitting or black spots. The only issue I've had with the pans is doing baked goods- I don't find that you get very good browning or crust in the aluminum pans.

And I also echo the idea of placing the pan on a baking sheet- removes the risk of having the pan "flex" on you and dump your casserole on the oven floor.

Stephanie-Oh
01-13-2009, 09:29 PM
[QUOTE=gertdog;1457079]Ew! Ew ew ew. They think it "evaporates" ????!! That is just so... yuck.

My sentiments exactly. One of the them worked in a large school cafeteria and the other was a veteran chef who worked at some very high end resorts along the East Coast area.:rolleyes: Steph

Canice
01-14-2009, 03:12 AM
I really, really, REALLY hate to solicit help on the BB and then totally ignore it,...buuuuuut - I totally forgot to buy the darned pans at the grocery today!! :mad: I guess I now have an excuse to invite myself over again, picking up the W-S casserole :rolleyes:. I think I'll pick up a few aluminum trays anyhow, so that I have them on hand for future use.

This is half way OT, but I might mention that I used to buy cheap-o plates, platters, etc. at Goodwill or random garage sales and just use those when delivering food. That way you can bring your lemon bars or orzo salad on a "real" dish and not give a rip about getting the plate back.

LakeMartinGal
01-14-2009, 08:17 AM
This is half way OT, but I might mention that I used to buy cheap-o plates, platters, etc. at Goodwill or random garage sales and just use those when delivering food. That way you can bring your lemon bars or orzo salad on a "real" dish and not give a rip about getting the plate back.Hey! Good idea!:cool:

Gumbeaux
01-14-2009, 09:00 AM
I think I'll pick up a few aluminum trays anyhow, so that I have them on hand for future use.


Pick up a few disposable plastic pans like clairea mentioned. I use these when taking casseroles to other people's houses. I have some that are black plastic that I like because the presentation looks a lot better than aluminum.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51BRRCG331L._SL500_AA280_PIbundle-6,TopRight,0,0_AA280_SH20_.jpg

clairea
01-14-2009, 11:41 AM
Pick up a few disposable plastic pans like clairea mentioned. I use these when taking casseroles to other people's houses. I have some that are black plastic that I like because the presentation looks a lot better than aluminum.

I mentioned these, but in the interest of full disclosure I will say that I don't use them anymore because I am pretty sure they aren't BPA free.

[QUOTE=Canice;1457132]
This is half way OT, but I might mention that I used to buy cheap-o plates, platters, etc. at Goodwill or random garage sales and just use those when delivering food. That way you can bring your lemon bars or orzo salad on a "real" dish and not give a rip about getting the plate back.

This is a great idea!

Gumbeaux
01-14-2009, 11:51 AM
I mentioned these, but in the interest of full disclosure I will say that I don't use them anymore because I am pretty sure they aren't BPA free.




This (http://www.glad.com/pdf/Glad-Bisphenal_A_Declaration.pdf) is from the Glad website:


Do GladWareŽ Containers contain BPA (Bisphenol A)?
NO. Glad food containers, wraps, and storage bags and other food contact products are not made of Polycarbonate nor is Bisphenol A (BPA) used as a raw material in their production.

clairea
01-14-2009, 12:07 PM
This (http://www.glad.com/pdf/Glad-Bisphenal_A_Declaration.pdf) is from the Glad website:


Do GladWareŽ Containers contain BPA (Bisphenol A)?
NO. Glad food containers, wraps, and storage bags and other food contact products are not made of Polycarbonate nor is Bisphenol A (BPA) used as a raw material in their production.

Good to know :)

birdyone
01-14-2009, 07:13 PM
I've been using the aluminum disposable containers for too many years - love, love them - particularly when making lasagna, casseroles/whatever for my 3 adult children (when I make too much or just simply want to share) - have never had a problem.

The one thing that I notice the higher-end stores in the GTA area do - is put a piece of parchment paper first, then the lid - which gets removed if there is any 'cardboard matter in the lid closure' involved.

When I make a large tray of lasagna for here, I always spray the foil with Pam/whatever - never any 'pitting'.

Those crazy Stouffer people - how on earth have they stayed in business for so many years - shocking that they still continue to use those disposable aluminum pans - WOW:D