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haley17
11-01-2009, 10:40 AM
I have not been successful in making a really flavorful chicken noodle soup. My broth usually turns out kind of watery and tasteless, but I am going to try again. What is your best chicken noodle soup?

Canice
11-01-2009, 11:02 AM
Are you looking then for both stock and a soup recipe? As for the soup itself, this one -originally posted by Wendy- is to me the best for a cold.

This is perfect chicken noodle soup for cold season - lots of garlic and ginger! I only had 3 cups of chicken and that was plenty for me; actually I'd have been happy with 2. I upped the garlic, dill, and lemon and added fresh parsley as well.

Chicken Noodle Soup with Dill

10 cups chicken broth, reduced sodium or homemade
3 medium carrots -- peeled and diced
3 stalks celery -- diced
3 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
6 cloves garlic -- minced
4 ounces dried egg noodles -- 3 cups
4 cups shredded cooked chicken (approx 1 lb)
3 Tablespoons chopped fresh dill
1 tablespoon lemon juice -- or to taste

Bring broth to a boil in a Dutch oven. Add carrots, celery, ginger, and garlic: cook, uncovered, over medium heat until vegetables are just tender, about 20 minutes.

Add noodles and chicken, continue cooking until the noodles are just tender, 8 to 10 minutes. Stir in dill and lemon juice.

More of Canice's notes: Celery is missing from the ingredient list so used 3 stalks. I only had 3 cups of chicken and that was plenty for me. Upped the dill, garlic, and lemon. 20 minutes is too long to cook the carrots and celery IMO - I'll try 10 next time.

KristiB
11-01-2009, 11:24 AM
The one Canice posted is originally from Eating Well and is my "go to" chicken soup recipe as well.

The original is HERE (http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/chicken_noodle_soup_with_dill.html) and calls for one stalk of celery which is what I use.

Canice
11-01-2009, 11:29 AM
Thanks, Kristi! I never had that attribution before. (Oops, I see my comments are replicated; I copied it from another posting.)

charley
11-01-2009, 12:15 PM
Canice, I've never added garlic or ginger to mine. I think I'll try that next time. Thanks!

This is my basic recipe.

Chicken Noodle Soup

Leftover roasted chicken & carcass
Water (or combo of water and chicken broth)
2 tablespoons butter
3 ribs celery, chopped
2-3 carrots, chopped
1 large onion, chopped
1 shallot, finely minced
Fresh thyme to taste
Salt & pepper to taste
Egg noodles (No Yolk are good, but I like the Amish type too.)
2 cups cooked chicken

Remove meat from carcass and set aside.

Simmer carcass in water to cover for 1 ½ - 2 hours. Remove bones and strain stock. Refrigerate for a few hours to allow fat to solidify. Remove fat from top of stock.

In large Dutch oven sauté veggies in melted butter for about 10 minutes. Add about 8 cups broth and lots of fresh thyme. Season to taste with S&P. Bring to boil. Add noodles and cook at low boil till done. Add chicken meat and heat for few more minutes.

http://photos.smugmug.com/photos/699616297_2NQvr-M.jpg

wallycat
11-01-2009, 12:17 PM
I love the easy one from Gourmet that is actually an egg-drop soup of sorts:

Here is the original, but you can tweak it...add diced chicken, or spinach and skip the noodles or in addition to the noodles....
I also crush my garlic and leave it in.

I hope you feel better soon!

Chinese Egg Drop Soup with Noodles Gourmet | February 2002

Though egg drop soup is not traditionally made with noodles, we love the texture and substance they add.
Yield: Makes 4 servings
Active Time: 10 min
Total Time: 20 min
ingredients
5 cups chicken stock, or 4 cups chicken broth plus 1 cup water
1 teaspoon soy sauce
2 tablespoons medium-dry Sherry
1 (2-inch) piece fresh ginger, thinly sliced
1 garlic clove, smashed
1 cup dried fine egg noodles (1 oz)
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
1 to 2 scallions, thinly sliced
1 1/2 teaspoons Asian sesame oil, or to taste
preparation

Bring stock, soy sauce, Sherry, ginger, and garlic to a boil in a 2-quart heavy saucepan. Remove ginger and garlic with a slotted spoon and discard. Stir in noodles and simmer, uncovered, until tender, about 4 minutes. Stirring soup in a circular motion, add eggs in a slow, steady stream. Simmer, undisturbed, until strands of egg are cooked, about 1 minute. Remove from heat and stir in scallions (to taste) and sesame oil. Season with salt.

Epicurious.com © Condé Nast Digital, Inc. All rights reserved.

charley
11-01-2009, 03:19 PM
Here's a quick and easy one without noodles.

Stracciatella Soup

32 oz. of chicken broth
2 cloves of garlic, cracked
bunch of baby spinach
2 eggs, beaten
Parmesan cheese, grated
Optional: little freshly grated nutmeg and/or fresh lemon zest

Bring pot of broth to a boil. Add 2 cracked cloves of garlic and simmer for a few minutes. Add chopped spinach and simmer for another few minutes. Remove garlic.

Beat eggs with salt & pepper and slowly add to broth stirring constantly. Serve immediately with freshly grated Parmesan.

NOTE: I beat some of the cheese into the eggs before adding to the soup.

http://photos.smugmug.com/photos/699838440_mRqqg-M.jpg

SueK
11-01-2009, 03:21 PM
I know you asked for a chicken soup recipe, but here is one that fits the bill when I have a cold, allergy flareup, or sinus problems. You can adjust it to your taste for heat and it really does a great job of soothing your soul and clearing your head!

Hot and Sour Soup
WW Take Out Tonight Cookbook

Ingredients

6 dried wood ear mushrooms (I used creminis)
4 cups low sodium chicken broth
2 tablespoons reduced sodium soy sauce
1 tablespoon chilli garlic sauce (I used 3 TBS-I like it hot!)
3 tablespoons rice vinegar
1 teaspoon Asian (dark) sesame oil
1/2 pound reduced fat soft tofu drained and cut in 1/2 inch cubes
1 8 oz. can thinly sliced bamboo shoots
2 1/2 tablespoons cornstarch
3 tablespoons water
1 egg white slightly beaten with 1 tablespoon water

Instructions

1. Leave the wood ear msuhrooms in water for 15 minutes then drain (I just washed and sliced my mushrooms pretty thin)

2. Bring the broth, soy sauce, chili-garlic sauce, vinegar and sesame oil to boil. Add the drained mushrooms, tofu and bamboo shoots.

3. Combine the cornstarch and water and add 1/4 cup of the hot liquid into the conrstarch mix well.

4. Add the cornstarch into the mixture and stir constantly until the mixture thickens about 1 minute.

5. Remove from the heat

6. Slowly drizzle the egg mixture into the soup while stirring in a circular motion.

Serves 4 1 1/3 cup per serving and 2 points per serving.

Gilgamesh37
11-01-2009, 05:04 PM
THIS (http://community.cookinglight.com/showthread.php?t=87159&highlight=rainy) is our house "I'm sick" chicken soup. Lovely and creamy and soothing to the soul (originally from one of Diane Mott Davidson's mysteries).

ljt2r
11-01-2009, 06:39 PM
Like SueK I prefer something kind of spicy and sour when I am sick. I like to make endless variations on sopa de lima and/or Southwestern chicken soups.

Sweet Potato & Tomatillo Sopa De Lima
My recipe, pictures here (http://thespicedlife.blogspot.com/2009/03/another-sore-throat-another-sopa-de.html)

1 large red onion, chopped
1-2 T olive oil
6-8 garlic cloves, minced
1 large sweet bellpepper, chopped
1 jalapeno, seeded and minced
2 t ground cumin
1 t ground coriander
1 t ground New Mexico Chile powder
1 large sweet potato (the orange kind), diced (I do not peel)
homemade stock, about 64 oz--I used a combo of chicken and pork stock
8 oz chopped tomatoes (about half a can, drained a bit)
1 cup roasted and pureed fresh tomatillos (I used frozen from last summer)
2-3 cans' worth beans--either cooked and drained or canned, drained and rinsed
1 bag frozen corn, preferably organic, or equivalent fresh
1 1/2 cups shredded roasted chicken
1/2 - 3/4 cup fresh lemon juice (I used some frozen cubes and am unsure of amount--choose amount based on how sour you like your soup)

For garnish:
sour cream
monterey jack cheese
salsa verde

Heat a large soup pot or dutch oven on medium high heat and add the olive oil to heat it to shimmering. Add the onions with a pinch of salt and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 10 minutes. Add the garlic, jalapeno and bell pepper and cook another 3 minutes. Add the spices and the sweet potatoes and cook, stirring, for about 1 minute. Add the tomatoes and cook for 3 more minutes. Add the tomatillos and cook another minute or 2. Add the stock and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and cover and cook until sweet potatoes are tender (10-30 minutes, about, depending on how cooked the sweet potatoes got from the frying and how big the dices are). Add the lemon juice and taste for saltyness, sourness, and seasoning in general. Add the beans, corn and shredded chicken and return to a simmer. Serve with sour cream, salsa verde and monterey jack cheese.


Laura’s Kitchen Sink Sopa de Lima

My recipe, pictures here. (http://thespicedlife.blogspot.com/2008/08/what-has-your-oven-done-for-you-lately.html)


1-2 T vegetable oil (I used olive)

1 large onion, diced

6 cloves of garlic, minced

1 sweet bell pepper, diced

1 T Mexican oregano

1 t ground cumin

1 can of diced or whole tomatoes

Good quality chicken stock, 64 oz (low sodium if commercial)*

2 cans of beans of choice (I used some of the homemade chicken stock and cooked up some Yellow Indian Woman beans from Rancho Gordo)

2-3 cups of shredded rotisserie chicken

Juice from 3-5 limes (taste as you go)

2 corn tortillas, ripped into small pieces

¼ cup chopped cilantro

For garnish:

Green salsa, preferably hot

Shredded Monterey Jack cheese

Sour cream

Tortilla chips/strips

Heat a large Dutch oven or soup pot over medium high heat. When it is hot, add the oil and heat to shimmering. Add the onions, and cook until translucent, about 8 minutes. Add the garlic and cook an additional minute. Then add the bell pepper and cook for 2 minutes. Add the spices and cook for 30 seconds or so, stirring constantly to prevent scorching of the spices. Add the tomatoes—if using whole, squeeze the tomatoes into the pot 1 by 1. Cook for another 6 to 8 minutes to concentrate the flavors. Add the chicken and beans (and corn or hominy if using--I did not as I did not have any).

*OK here is the embarrassing-remember-my-brain-is-foggy-and-sick part. I measured everything for you guys except the stock. The point at which you put the stock in, there is not much else left to go in, so to a certain extent you can just eyeball it to what looks right for a chicken soup to you. I want to say around… 10-12 ladles maybe? Maybe 6-8 cups? I am pretty sure that if I had been using commercial stock, 2 32 oz containers would have been plenty.

After adding the chicken stock, add the small pieces of corn tortillas, then turn the heat down to low, cover, and let simmer for at least 45 minutes, but longer is fine if it works into your schedule. Before serving, uncover and add the juice of 3 limes. Taste for salt and more lime juice. I like this soup quite sour and will add quite a lot of lime juice—and when I eat it as leftovers I will add even more lime juice, in case any of it has dulled. Throw in the cilantro and serve, accompanied by the garnishes.

sneezles
11-01-2009, 06:42 PM
Had a Jewish Family Practice doctor for over 20 years and he said just to up the onion and garlic in your favorite recipe though the ginger is a nice tough too.

peachesncream
11-01-2009, 06:46 PM
Don't forget CL's Roasted-Chicken Noodle Soup, which is one of CL's best recipes (IMO).

You can use leftover roast chicken, cooked chicken breast or turkey breast, or start with a rotisserie chicken from the grocery.

I've made this for company, subbing Half & Half for the evaporated skim milk. I leave out the potatoes if I'm planning on freezing leftovers.

http://find.myrecipes.com/recipes/recipefinder.dyn?action=displayRecipe&recipe_id=520991

Canice
11-02-2009, 03:00 AM
I love the easy one from Gourmet that is actually an egg-drop soup of sorts:

LOVE egg-drop soup of any sort!



Stracciatella Soup
...and that includes stracciatella! :p

All these alternative suggestions remind me of my ex (who lives in a very Chinese neighborhood) going into his favorite neighborhood restaurant, where he is pretty much always the only white person in the place. Tells the waiter, "I'd like a big bowl of hot and sour soup -- I have a terrible cold." Waiter takes the order and disappears. A few minutes later a cook in whites shows up at his table: "You have cold?"
"Yes, a terrible cold."
"Hot and sour soup no good for cold! I make special soup for you -- in kitchen!"
We joke about "-- in kitchen!" to this day.:p

Sheila in MD
11-02-2009, 05:35 AM
THIS (http://community.cookinglight.com/showthread.php?t=87159&highlight=rainy) is our house "I'm sick" chicken soup. Lovely and creamy and soothing to the soul (originally from one of Diane Mott Davidson's mysteries).

I love this one too but have a question! In the OP you mention that you can make the base and freeze it...when you do that, do you add the sour cream before freezing as well? Thanks!

Sheila in MD

sparrowgrass
11-02-2009, 09:25 AM
If your broth is thin and watery, you need to start by making a good stock.

I buy chicken leg quarters in 10 pound bags (very cheaply--59-89 cents a pound).

I cut the quarters into a drumstick and a thigh, then I remove the small piece of back that is attached to the thigh. I use those small bony pieces of chicken to make my stock for soup--there is probably 2 pounds of back in that 10 pound bag of leg quarters. Sometimes I bone out the thighs, and use those bones/skin, too.

I cut a couple of onions, carrots and stalks of celery into chunks, and use about twice as much water as the total volume of solids. I pressure cook my stock for an hour or so, but you can do it in a big stock pot for 3 or 4 hours.

Strain the solids out (discard them, or feed them to the dogs if you have pressure cooked them), and stick the stock in the fridge overnight so you can lift the fat off the top. The bones and skin add lots of gelatin, which makes the stock rich. You cannot make good soup from boneless, skinless breast meat.

Sometimes I put the leg quarters whole into the pressure cooker or stock pot. I cook them til the meat is just done, take the meat from the bones and put the bones/skin/cartilege back into the stock pot and continue cooking for an additional hour or so.

Use this homemade stock in your recipe--your soup will be rich and yummy and guaranteed to make you feel better. I keep quart containers in the freezer so I can have soup at a moments notice.

Gilgamesh37
11-02-2009, 09:37 AM
I love this one too but have a question! In the OP you mention that you can make the base and freeze it...when you do that, do you add the sour cream before freezing as well? Thanks!

Sheila in MD


Sheila, I've done it both ways, frozen before and after I've added the sour cream. Both work, but I think I prefer to freeze it before. Then when I need it, I put the frozen base portion in a pan over low heat to thaw. I heat another pan with some chicken stock and cook the fideo noodles in that, add both together and then add the sour cream.

Which reminds me, I should get off my duff and make some more portions of this before cold season starts in earnest!

jellyben
11-02-2009, 10:16 AM
We love this one from Rachael Ray:

http://www.recipezaar.com/Ginger-Vegetable-Chicken-Noodle-Bowl-307307

Gilgamesh, I am so intrigued by your recipe. I have never heard of adding sour cream to chicken noodle soup-this is on the menu for this week.

Gilgamesh37
11-02-2009, 11:00 AM
Gilgamesh, I am so intrigued by your recipe. I have never heard of adding sour cream to chicken noodle soup-this is on the menu for this week.

I'll be interested to hear what you think. I will say that with most soups, this one included, I tend to play pretty fast and loose with proportions/amounts---if I made this exactly as written up to that point, I doubt I'd use a full cup of lite sour cream. I usually stir it in until it turns a lovely sort of opaque color and tastes right to me---there's a very slight tang, but mostly a velvety mouthfeel and sense of depth.

Sheila in MD
11-02-2009, 11:14 AM
Sheila, I've done it both ways, frozen before and after I've added the sour cream. Both work, but I think I prefer to freeze it before. Then when I need it, I put the frozen base portion in a pan over low heat to thaw. I heat another pan with some chicken stock and cook the fideo noodles in that, add both together and then add the sour cream.

Thanks! Will try that...I do love this soup! FWIW-I have found I like it MUCH better when I use porcini's. My favorite cousin went to Italy and sent me a large bag of dried porcini's! YUM!

Sheila in MD

PAMMELA
11-02-2009, 11:43 AM
Don't forget CL's Roasted-Chicken Noodle Soup, which is one of CL's best recipes (IMO).




IMO too!!!

Hoodone
11-02-2009, 12:13 PM
I, like Sparrowgrass, pressure cook my stock, too. IMO this is one of the MOST AWESOME uses for the pressure cooker. Something about the pressure cooker really drives the flavor out of the bones.

Personally, whenever I have a rotisserie chicken carcass I use that to make my stock (be sure to get all the gelatinous ooze off the bottom of the container). It's not as genuine as starting with meaty pieces, but easy. I loosely follow Lorna Sass's Pressure Perfect recipe. The biggest pain about making stock is having to wait for the fat to congeal on the top before using it.

sparrowgrass
11-03-2009, 09:22 AM
I have a fat separator cup that works really well. It is heat proof glass, so you can see when to stop.

I use it when I am in a hurry--otherwise I just stick the bowl of stock in the fridge.

Kathy B
11-03-2009, 09:28 AM
Slightly different request, but does anyone have a TNT recipe for chicken orzo soup?

krhm
11-03-2009, 09:36 AM
I also make homemade stock from leftover bones, etc, and agree that it makes a huge difference.

I do take a cue from Anthony Bourdain and often use Minor's chicken base to enrich the stock. I probably use it half strength. That gives it a lovely golden color and just some extra oomph.

If you're not squeamish, chicken feet really take stock to new heights. I have some ethnic markets where they are cheap and always available, but I don't always have time to get them. They cook with the bones.

And for my favorite recipe, I love Ellie Krieger's Lemon Chicken Soup with Orzo. I use previously roasted chicken breast and add baby spinach right before serving.

Lemon Chicken Soup with Orzo

4 teaspoons olive oil
8 ounces skinless, boneless chicken breast halves, cut into small chunks
Pinch of salt, plus more to taste
1 medium onion, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
2 stalks celery, diced (about 1/2 cup)
1 medium carrot, diced (about 1/2 cup)
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme or 1/2 teaspoon dried
6 cups low-sodium chicken broth
1 cup orzo, preferably whole wheat
2 large eggs
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
Freshly ground black pepper to taste


Heat 2 teaspoons of the oil in a soup pot over medium-high heat. Season the chicken with the salt, add it to the pot, and cook, stirring, a few times, until just cooked through, about 5 minutes. Transfer the chicken to a dish and set aside.



Add the remaining 2 teaspoons oil to the pot. Add the onion, celery, carrot, and thyme and cook, stirring, over medium-high heat until the vegetables are tender, about 5 minutes. Add 5 cups of the broth and bring to a boil. Add the orzo and let simmer until tender, about 8 minutes. Turn the heat down to low to keep the soup hot but not boiling.



Warm the remaining 1 cup broth in a small saucepan until it is hot but not boiling. In a medium bowl, beat the eggs. Gradually whisk the lemon juice into the eggs. Then gradually add the hot broth to the egg-lemon mixture, whisking all the while. Add the mixture to the soup, stirring well until the soup is thickened. Do not let the soup come to a boil. Add the cooked chicken to the soup. Season with salt and pepper and serve.



Makes 4 servings
Serving size: 1 1/2 cups



Per serving:
Calories 280; Total fat 10g (Sat fat 2g, Mono fat 6g, Poly fat 1g); Protein 26g; Carb 22g; Fiber 2g; Cholesterol 139mg; Sodium 291mg



Excellent source of:
niacin, phosphorus, potassium, riboflavin, selenium, vitamin A, vitamin B6, vitamin C

Good source of:
copper, folate, iodine, iron, magnesium, molybdenum, pantothenic acid, thiamin, vitamin B12, vitamin K, zinc

Angelsfan
11-03-2009, 10:04 AM
And for my favorite recipe, I love Ellie Krieger's Lemon Chicken Soup with Orzo.

This thread got me in the mood for chicken noodle soup yesterday so I made EK's recipe as well. I really wanted the texture of egg noodles so I replaced the orzo with them. I had to add more chicken broth. It turned out awesome.

-Heather

Kathy B
11-03-2009, 10:22 AM
And for my favorite recipe, I love Ellie Krieger's Lemon Chicken Soup with Orzo. I use previously roasted chicken breast and add baby spinach right before serving.

Lemon Chicken Soup with Orzo


Thank you! :)

peachesncream
11-04-2009, 11:33 PM
I may be losing my mind. I could have sworn this is the thread where I got the idea to try Rachel Ray's 30 Minute Chicken Noodle Soup. Yet, I've read through the thread and not found any mention of it. :confused: Anyway, we had this soup for dinner last night and really enjoyed it. It's a great, basic chicken noodle soup. This recipe is a keeper!

I used a bit less noodles (6 oz.), added 1 cup water (as suggested) and a teaspoon of chicken soup base, and only used 2 Tablespoons fresh dill. Used Swanson's Natural Goodness chicken broth, which meant the soup needed salt added (1 tsp. Kosher salt) and some pepper.

30 Minute Chicken Noodle Soup:

http://www.recipezaar.com/30-Minute-Chicken-Noodle-Soup-From-Foodtv-Rachael-Ray-28670

jellyben
11-10-2009, 05:39 PM
Bumping this up because I made Gilgamesh's Rainy Day soup and it was absolutely delicious! The sour cream let a very subtle tang and the whole thing was just so yummy and comforting in a simple way. And the kids loved it which is an added bonus. Thanks so much Gilgamesh!

mightyh
11-11-2009, 05:34 PM
I wanted to add this recipe.... it's chicken and rice, but so delicious when I am feeling under the weather. Something about the spiciness tastes so good....

Caldo Tlalpeno

Although there are many variations of this Mexican chicken soup, spicy chipotle chiles are always part of the broth. Make it a meal: Serve with a Mexican beer and cheese quesadillas.

Makes 4 servings

ACTIVE TIME: 30 minutes

TOTAL TIME: 40 minutes

EASE OF PREPARATION: Easy

6 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
1/2 cup water
1 head garlic, cloves separated and peeled
8 ounces boneless, skinless chicken breast, trimmed
2 teaspoons canola oil
1 medium onion, chopped
1 poblano or Anaheim chile pepper, chopped
1 canned chipotle pepper in adobo sauce (see Shopping Tip)
1 cup instant brown rice
4 radishes, sliced
1 small avocado, chopped
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1 lime, quartered

1. Bring broth, water, garlic and chicken to a boil in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook, skimming any foam that rises to the top, until the garlic is tender and the chicken is cooked through, 12 to 15 minutes. Remove from the heat. Transfer the garlic with a slotted spoon to a blender and the chicken to a clean cutting board.
2. Meanwhile, heat oil in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add onion and poblano (or Anaheim) chile and cook, stirring, until beginning to brown, 8 to 10 minutes. Add to the broth.
3. Add 1/2 cup of the broth and chipotle pepper to the blender and process until smooth (use caution when pureeing hot liquids). Pour the mixture back into the broth in the pan. Stir in rice. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and cook until the rice is tender, about 10 minutes.
4. Shred the chicken and divide among 4 bowls. Ladle the broth over the chicken and top with equal portions of radish, avocado and cilantro. Serve with a wedge of lime.

NUTRITION INFORMATION: Per serving: 318 calories; 13 g fat (2 g sat, 7 g mono); 39 mg cholesterol; 31 g carbohydrate; 22 g protein; 6 g fiber; 264 mg sodium; 517 mg potassium.
Nutrition bonus: Vitamin C (60% daily value), Selenium (16% dv).
1 1/2 Carbohydrate Servings
Exchanges: 1 1/2 starch, 1 vegetable, 2 lean meat, 1 1/2 fat

TIP: Shopping Tip: Chipotle peppers in adobo sauce are smoked jalape�os packed in a flavorful sauce. Look for the small cans with the Mexican foods in large supermarkets. Once opened, they�ll keep 2 weeks in the refrigerator or 6 months in the freezer.



Caldo Tlalpe�o - another healthy recipe from EatingWell