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View Full Version : What is the definitive word on using cooking spray on non-stick cookware?



KLynn
01-14-2010, 11:20 AM
I know it is considered a no-no, but so many light recipes call for spraying a non-stick skillet with cooking spray. What is the deal? Do you or don't you? I just got new cookware (Calphalon One on closeout) and I really want to care for it properly.

Thanks!

Laurielee
01-14-2010, 11:56 AM
YOu dont want to use them, they wil lruin your pans. You can get one of those mister spray bottles for oil and add your oil, like this, I have ruined pans using the other sprays


http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/319247VKE7L._SS400_.jpg


I just add a little oil and wipe with a paper towel.

dreamer
01-14-2010, 12:16 PM
KLynn,
I went through the exact same thought process last summer, when I got a new set of Calphalon cookware, and read their instructions. And I ended up coming to the same general conclusion as Laurielee, that despite CL's constant instruction to coat pan with cooking spray, I was not going to do it. I don't use a mister, but will just put a little tiny bit on oil in the pan and rub it around with a paper towel or a basting brush.
I don't have Calphalon for baking pans, I have less expensive stuff, so when baking cakes or something like that, I feel free to spray 'em.
So far, so good!
dreamer

KLynn
01-14-2010, 12:21 PM
Thanks - this confirms what I thought. What puzzles me is why CL (and other sources) continue to recommend spraying non-stick cookware with cooking spray? Do they believe the calorie savings over time is simply worth damaging cookware? Do they do that in their own test kitchens?

sarah2397
01-14-2010, 01:01 PM
Has anyone had experience with the Pam for High Heat (http://www.pam4you.com/pages/products/professional/index.jsp) on non-stick? I got the impression that this would be a better option although I am afraid to try it myself.

patsyk
01-14-2010, 01:03 PM
I've wondered the same thing... and some of my less expensive pans I've followed the recipe and sprayed them... and they are not holding up well at all. I like the idea of using a paper towel to coat with a little oil to provide that smooth surface. Glad I saw that tip!

funniegrrl
01-14-2010, 01:19 PM
I have only two non-stick pans, but I use them a lot. I use Mazola non-stick spray and have had no problems with residue or anything else.

LakeMartinGal
01-14-2010, 01:59 PM
Has anyone had experience with the Pam for High Heat (http://www.pam4you.com/pages/products/professional/index.jsp) on non-stick? I got the impression that this would be a better option although I am afraid to try it myself.
It still left a gummy mess! My Kroger no longer carries it, but I used it all the time on my regular pans, and only once on a non-stick! Took me forever to get that gunk off!:eek:

Litehouse9
01-14-2010, 02:23 PM
I dont like the cooking sprays because of the chemicals used to make them and the propellants used in the aerosol cans. You can make your own natural Cooking Spray-- directions on EHow.com and PlanetGreen.Com.... see below. When you make your own, you are not getting any bad chemicals, you know what's in it, and it won't damage cookware. I think the calorie count of using your own light spray would be nominal (and healthier for you).

From Planet Green: How to make your own Non Stick Cooking Spray: ;)
It couldn't be easier, according to Tracey McBride, author of Frugal Luxuries: Simple Pleasures to Enhance Your Life and Comfort Your Soul (1997, Bantam). Simply combine equal parts organic vegetable oil and liquid lecithin-a natural emulsifier available at most health food stores and some drugstores-in a clean pump bottle. Slap on a label and shake the bottle well before use, and you'll never know the difference.

Difficulty level: Easy

swedish cook
01-14-2010, 03:09 PM
LakeMartinGal used the right words: gummy mess!

After a few sessions of intensive scouring of broiler pans I declared war on cooking sprays. That was many years ago and non-stick pans were never involved. Like Litehouse9 mentions - I have wondered a lot what really goes into those cans :eek:

I apply a light coating of oil using paper towel or a silicon brush.

dreamer
01-14-2010, 03:55 PM
Thanks - this confirms what I thought. What puzzles me is why CL (and other sources) continue to recommend spraying non-stick cookware with cooking spray? Do they believe the calorie savings over time is simply worth damaging cookware? Do they do that in their own test kitchens?

You raise some great questions- I'd love to know as well.

dreamer

blazedog
01-14-2010, 04:11 PM
I use the spray Olive Oil and don't have problems but also there is very little I don't use a smidgeon of Olive Oil on anyway so my spraying for cooking is pretty minimal at this point.

A paper towel with some olive oil (or other oil) rubbed across accomplishes the same thing.

memartha
01-14-2010, 04:54 PM
What the others have said. The nonstick sprays definitely are not the friend of the nonstick pans. It's a GREAT question to ask, why CL (and others) tell you to spray a nonstick pan with spray. I've ruined my share of pans and cookie sheets that way.

I still have some High-Heat Pam (or whatever it's called, in the silver can), which I use on my broiler pan, which is NOT nonstick. I also use the regular nonstick spray on things like my crockpot and casserole dishes. Otherwise, it's a drizzle of oil (or butter) in the nonstick pans.

armel
01-14-2010, 06:04 PM
I never spray a non-stick pan with spray. I omit that step and follow the rest of the recipe. I don't replace it with anything else. My food doesn't stick. And if it was suppose to add some flavor somehow, I guess I have never missed it.

I will spray olive oil spray on metal parts of my smoker after cleaning it. or spray Weber on the grill of my gas grill.

bobmark226
01-14-2010, 06:23 PM
What the others have said. The nonstick sprays definitely are not the friend of the nonstick pans. .

Well, no, NOT what the others have said, excepting Funniegrrl.

I've used Mazola Pure for about six years on a variety of non-stick. I have a mix of Emerilware and Calphalon, which I've sprayed with it for at least six years with ZERO gummy buildup.

Aside from the Mazola, I wash my pans well with hot water and dish soap.

Yes, there are people who like to mix lechithin and oil...yuck. Yes, there are people who like those fillable spray bottles. The ones I've tried sooner or later gum up on me. Some of us just like the convenience of, and don't mind the bit of added expense of, commercial non-stick sprays, in which case Mazola Pure will most likely be just fine with the usual attention you give to any good cookware.

So, there's no "definitive word" like was asked for, just ways that work and ways that don't or ways that you don't care to bother with.

Bob

mightyh
01-14-2010, 07:15 PM
Are you still able to find Mazola Pure? It's not on my grocery shelves around here (Colorado) anymore and I am down to what feels like an almost-empty bottle. I love Mazola Pure and was so happy when I heard your initial recommendation for it.... now wondering what to do!

bobmark226
01-14-2010, 07:50 PM
Are you still able to find Mazola Pure?

Yes, I am.

Bob

funniegrrl
01-14-2010, 08:53 PM
Thanks Bob. Sometimes when I post responses here it feels like I'm talking to a brick wall. Sometimes I wonder why I bother.

JackieO
01-14-2010, 09:11 PM
I don't have high-end cookware except for a Calphalon everyday pan -- most of my other stuff is Circulon. That being said, I have avoided using cooking sprays because of the questionable ingredients and residue on the cookware.

I also have a Misto, but that gets gummy and difficult to clean, so it's sitting at the back of the pantry shelf.

For about a year or so, however, I've been using Trader Joe's EVOO spray on my lesser-quality pans and baking sheets -- ingredients are EVOO, soy lethicin and propellent. No gunk, and I've recently used it several times with my Calphalon and Circulon with no ill results. <cross fingers>

Like Bob, I wash everything soon after use in warm, soapy water.

I use the Pam high heat stuff on our gas grill in the summer, and it's sticky. But I don't care so much about my grill rack...that's a pretty industrial-grade surface! :eek:

Interesting to read all the responses....

oct2189
01-14-2010, 09:20 PM
Pam AND High heat Pam have ruined my All-Clad nonstick skillet.:(
I will look for the Mazola Pure for future use.

DanaSD
01-14-2010, 09:33 PM
I just pour a small amount of olive oil in the pan and spread it with a paper towel.

I think the cans are a waste of packaging (and $)

jtoepfert100
01-15-2010, 09:46 AM
Like funniegrrl and Bob, I've never ruined a non-stick pan with cooking spray. However, I've never used Mazola Pure. What is the difference between it and Pam?

blazedog
01-15-2010, 09:49 AM
Like funniegrrl and Bob, I've never ruined a non-stick pan with cooking spray. However, I've never used Mazola Pure. What is the difference between it and Pam?

I've never used Mazola Pure but I do use the Olive Oil Spray.

I believe the original PAM (and its generic counterparts) use Lecithin.

The ingredients in my Olive Oil Spray can are just Olive Oil -- assume the same is true for Mazola Pure.

There wouldn't be much difference between my Olive Oil (commercial) spray and a homemade mister. I get mine at TJ so the cost is higher than oil but still pretty nominal considering how little I use it.

heavy hedonist
01-15-2010, 10:03 AM
I got a Misto as a gift one year. I folllowed the instructions exactly and found that it held so little, and needed to be cleaned so often, that it was far more trouble than wiping the oil around with a brush-- as I had to half the time anyway, since it didn't spritz all that well. What a disappointment.
Now I swirl the oil around and don't worry if there's a couple drops more or less than called for.

apple*tart
01-15-2010, 10:27 AM
I have the secret for using misto cans! I have two (one for olive oil and one for a neutral-tasting oil like canola), have been using them religiously for about a year and a half following the directions below, and they have NEVER clogged, gummed up, or given me any trouble.

1. Fill them with no more than 1/3 cup oil when you refill them. Measure. Adding more will give you problems.

2. After you're done cooking a given meal, release the pressure from the misto can. This is the most important part. I have no idea why Misto's site says you don't have to do this; you do. Otherwise you will end up with clogged mistos. But - it's easy and takes a matter of seconds. Simply twist the top like you're going to take it off and you'll hear the air decompressing. Or, you can turn the can upside down in the sink and press the sprayer nozzle to "spray" out all of the air.

That's it!

I find I only need to refill my mistos once every couple of months. If I only had one, I image it would be every month or so. If you can believe misto's site, a one-second spray equals 1/4 tsp. So, there are 64 one-second sprays in 1/3 cup. A good one-one-thousand count is usually all I need to do my a pan, maybe 2 seconds to do a cookie sheet.

Cleaning is a snap too. Take the lid off, fill the canister about half-way with hot water and a little dish soap. Put the lid back on, give it a shake, pump it up to pressurize, and then spray out the hot water. Open lid, rinse out with cool water, fill it half-way with cold water, pump it up, and spray out the cold water to rinse the hose and nozzle.

I love my mistos. 100% oil, no chemicals, nothing to gum up my cookie sheets, no waste, and saves money. :)

carolyn.1
01-15-2010, 02:20 PM
I have ruined baking sheets using Pam spray. Very gummy and sticky...just ruined. I also found that it does not work well with cast iron, (not that anyone said to use it on cast iron). Nice sticky mess. Long time ago I used Mazola because it was cheaper than Pam, then I couldn't find it anymore. Well, I just recently found it again (by accident) at Harris Teeter. I don't shop there because it is 40 miles out of my way. So I'll go there and pick up several cans at one time. I really do like it alot.

armel
01-15-2010, 04:21 PM
I really must be missing something.

Why would you ever need to spray a non-stick pan in the first place? It is already non-stick.

Just Mary
01-15-2010, 07:10 PM
I've used Pam on teflon pans for years without a problem or build-up. It's mainly for fast, not-too-high heat dishes like eggs or shrimp, though. My teflon pans are the commercial 2-pack Costco sells for around $20.

I do get gummy build-up on my non-Teflon pans like cookie sheets and a Calphalon pot, just from the fat in the foods. I believe any fat can turn to gummy residue. I even clean that gummy stuff off the floor and racks of my toaster oven, and the fat there is just from cheese.

I have some good-label misters and they work crappy. For the spitty mist they put out I may as well just fling olive oil off my fingers instead.

KLynn
01-18-2010, 06:14 PM
Thanks for the responses, everyone. In a way, I am glad to know the issue is more controversial than I thought it was! I thought I was just missing something. I think I will go with a wipe of oil or butter.

Wish I knew more about the CL reasoning and methods in their test kitchens.

Hint, hint...is anyone out there...?