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Denise
10-30-2000, 01:17 PM
I would love to make the fudgy souffle with turtle sauce, but would rather not buy a $20.00 souffle dish. Is there anything else I could make this in?

BeckyM
10-30-2000, 01:29 PM
I'm wondering the same thing, since I'm planning to make this for our Supper Club next week. Do we just need a baking dish with high sides? Or could we just use any old casserole dish?

andreajackson
10-30-2000, 09:36 PM
This recipe looks amazing and I can't wait to make it! However i didn't see that you have to have a special dish! That would be ok if you were planning to use it several times but not just for one recipe.

HARRYET
10-30-2000, 10:40 PM
I just had the same question about the souffle' pan, and sneezles answered that it is the same as a casserole dish but with high straight sides. I was itching to make this and did this weekent, unfortunately my egg white didn't form stiff peaks (why? I haven't a clue) and it didn't come out right, but I will try it again, It looks yummy!

emilycat
10-31-2000, 07:57 AM
HARRYET,
How long did you beat the eggs? Sometimes, I've had to beat for 10-15 minutes for the egg whites to be stiff.

ellielk
10-31-2000, 08:28 AM
I just read on another hread (about cream of tartar) that adding cream of tartar to egg whites makes them beat stiff.


Originally posted by emilycat:
HARRYET,
How long did you beat the eggs? Sometimes, I've had to beat for 10-15 minutes for the egg whites to be stiff.

Sarah
10-31-2000, 08:39 AM
Any straight sided dish will do, so long as it's deep enough. A good souflee should have space to double (or at least get a third bigger). One of the best non-souflee pans I have are my Corningware casseroles. They work great.

Sarah
10-31-2000, 08:40 AM
Any straight sided dish will do, so long as it's deep enough. A good souflee should have space to double (or at least get a third bigger). One of the best non-souflee pans I have are my Corningware casseroles. They work great.

HARRYET
10-31-2000, 08:52 AM
emily,
I did beat the egg whites for about 7-10 minutes, still no peaks, and I do know about cream of tartar but the recipe didn't call for it and was unsure how much to use, any suggestions? Thanks Ann

sneezles
10-31-2000, 09:24 AM
Ann
Your egg whites should be at room temp to beat. I don't have the recipe in front of me but instead of cream of tartar I would use a pinch of salt, if the recipe doesn't already call for it. Eggs are easier to separate cold but you can't get enough air into cold whites, hope this helps

[This message has been edited by sneezles (edited 10-31-2000).]

Abby
10-31-2000, 09:42 AM
I've had this egg white problem too. Isn't there another rule about using a metal bowl or something?

emilycat
10-31-2000, 10:07 AM
I'm not a baking expert by any means (read my caramelized sugar thread if you need a laugh http://www.cookinglight.com/bbs/wink.gif ) but I think one of the most important things when beating egg whites is that they're at room temperature, like sneezles said. Actually, I beat egg whites properly for the first time sometime this year, by following a guide in Cooking Light. If I'm not mistaken, it may have appeared in the Cooking Class series, and it gave step by step instructions on how to beat eggs. (I hope I'm not making this up http://www.cookinglight.com/bbs/redface.gif

Grace
10-31-2000, 10:14 AM
Hi everyone!

When beating egg whites, room temperature, cream of tartar, salt, and all of that are good ideas, but what was REALLY the problem, was there was probably a trace of grease somewhere on the bowl or beaters, or a tiny bit of the yolk got mixed in with the whites. For egg whites to whip up, there can be NO traces of grease or oil anyhwere around those eggwhites. So, if you're going to beat up the egg whites, wash your bowl and beaters really, really well with hot soapy water, and use a clean towel to dry them off thoroughly. Then be careful that there's no trace of yolk in the whites, and you should have great success!! Hope that helps.

Beth
10-31-2000, 10:32 PM
If in doubt, make a foil collar around your casserole dish. The Frech white ones that has slightly higher sides should work. I have a souffle in my china pattern that we use as a vegetable and serving dish as well, so if you decide to get a souffle dish someday, keep in mind that it can have other uses too.

HARRYET
11-01-2000, 04:41 PM
Thanks everyone for your suggestions, I will try this again w/your suggestions in mind the next time I make this, perhaps this weekend.
Ann

michard
11-02-2000, 01:51 PM
I would like to make this chocolate turtle souffle-like dish for a large dinner party on Nov. 11th. I'd like to make it in individual ramekins (custard cups) for a prettier presentation. Does anyone think this will work? Any ideas on how to adjust cooking time or temperatures? Also, how many do you think I can get out of it???