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View Full Version : Opinion needed - dark vs. light cake pans



RebeccaT
08-08-2002, 12:35 PM
A lot of you are very experienced bakers, so I look to you for advice... when choosing a cake pan, do you usually purchase a light colored pan? Or a darker pan? Why?

And while I am at it, do you get non-stick? Or commercial quality? Or Target cheapies?

Oh, and if I could be so bold, do any of you have any tricks for making sure that cakes baked in darker pans don't overbake?

Thanks! :D

sneezles
08-08-2002, 12:38 PM
I buy light, non-stick pans. Dark ones have to have the recipe adjusted or the cake will brown/burn. Non-stick because I always grease and flour anyway so I think its a waste. Better quality the longer you'll have the pan.

LaraW
08-08-2002, 12:42 PM
I have 2 cake pans that I got for a wedding gift. They have an "air layer" like the air-sheet cookie sheets (I am not explaining this very well :confused: ). I'll have to look to see what brand they are, but I have been very happy with them. They came from Kohl's, by the way.

Lara

buffygirl
08-08-2002, 12:45 PM
After years of replacing warped cookie sheets, cake pans etc. I decided to spring for the good stuff at WS. The quality is outstanding. I have the non-stick, but I think they may be dark:confused:

Kim

aggie94
08-08-2002, 12:47 PM
Originally posted by sneezles
I buy light, non-stick pans. Dark ones have to have the recipe adjusted or the cake will brown/burn. Non-stick because I always grease and flour anyway so I think its a waste. Better quality the longer you'll have the pan.

Sneezles, do you mean NOT non-stick? I'm confused. I thought all non-stick pans were dark. And based on what you said about greasing and flouring, it seems like you might have meant to say your pans aren't non-stick? :confused: Or maybe I'm just totally not getting it. :rolleyes:

buffygirl
08-08-2002, 12:51 PM
Stepping back in to add that I did buy cheapie removable bottom tart pans last weekend to make the Tomato Basil Tart. The were ronly $3.99 each at BB&B and since I needed 4, I jumped all over that. Of course I've only used them once, but they worked great!

Kim

sneezles
08-08-2002, 12:52 PM
Originally posted by aggie94


Sneezles, do you mean NOT non-stick? I'm confused. I thought all non-stick pans were dark. And based on what you said about greasing and flouring, it seems like you might have meant to say your pans aren't non-stick? :confused: Or maybe I'm just totally not getting it. :rolleyes:


Sorry, I just didn't word it correctly...I don't use non-stick cake pans! Except for my springforms :o !

RebeccaT
08-08-2002, 01:03 PM
I have a dark, non-stick bundt pan which I have used once, and my cake over-browned. I want to use it again this weekend, but I don't want the same thing to happen to me. I am thinking about buying another pan that's not dark, but if there is something I can do to make this one work, or if there is a reason to keep this one over a regular (not non-stick) pan, then maybe that's what I should do.

So what do ya'll think?

aggie94
08-08-2002, 01:03 PM
Thanks, sneezles. Now I'm with ya. :)

My cake pans are all non-stick, and I still grease and flour them or use parchment. :rolleyes: (I do wonder if I'm just wasting my time, but I still keep doing it.) I always "monitor" my cakes while they're baking anyway, so I don't find that having to adjust the baking time is a big deal. I never quite trust the recipe instructions for time on a cake, since ovens vary so much, so I just check it every few minutes and do the toothpick test. I never have a problem with overbaking, unless it's human error. :o

I don't really have an opinion on cheapies vs. nice cake pans. I think mine are somewhere in between. Although, I've gotta say, that I've been using Robyn's Wilton cake pans (while her kitchen was under construction and my cake pans were still in Eugene), and they are really nice. I can definitely tell a difference in the quality of the pans, and they seem like they will last forever. When I need to replace my cake pans, I'll probably look for those.

aggie94
08-08-2002, 01:08 PM
Rebecca,

I'd give it another go. I love my non-stick bundt pan and wouldn't trade it for a lighter one. Bundt cakes are hard enough to get out of the pan when it's non-stick. :o

I'd try reducing the baking temperature by 25 degrees, and checking the cake (a la toothpick method) at least 5 minutes before the recommended minimum baking time. Check it every couple of minutes (if it's not done). You shouldn't have a problem with overbaking, but it does require a little more attention.

sneezles
08-08-2002, 01:20 PM
OK, so I totally forgot about the bundt pan! It's non-stick and I do as Eva suggests, reduce temp 25 and baking time by 5 minutes!
All my good pans are Wilton pans and I have had them for years and years and years...

emily
08-08-2002, 04:33 PM
I just bought some cake pans today - Wilton's. Glad to hear they're good :)

I've been using the cheap-os for years and have finally decided to learn how to make a cake that looks pretty and just in case I succeed on the first attempt, I'm going to display it on my new cake stand (yep, Eva, I had to go to two stores.)

Rebecca, I know you're making a bundt cake, but in case you're interested, I got my cake pans at Michael's Craft store.

Oh, and my bundt pan, that I got years ago for $1 at Good Will is light colored, probably not non-stick in the traditional method, but I haven't had any problems with it.... of course I don't know that I've ever tried to take a cake out of it whole :o

em

RebeccaT
08-08-2002, 04:37 PM
em, what kind of cake are you going to make?

I am attempting Eating Well's Died and Went to Heaven Chocolate Cake. I just wish they had given it a shorter name - that one takes too long to type. :o

Thanks sneezles and Eva and everyone else who responded!

sushibones
08-08-2002, 04:41 PM
Here's Cook's Illustrated review of cake pans (http://www.americastestkitchen.com/equipmentcorner/108.htm).