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Robyncz
08-13-2002, 09:21 AM
How much dry yeast is in one of those little yeast packets? Specifically, if a recipe calls for 1 tablespoon or yeast, is that one packet?

Thanks!

beckms
08-13-2002, 09:22 AM
It should say on the package. 2 1/4 teaspoons rings a bell, but don't quote me. The easiest thing would be to just measure the contents of the package with your spoons.

wallycat
08-13-2002, 09:22 AM
I think the little packet is just a tiny bit over a tablespoon....
I buy my yeast in bulk and just use the 1 TBS when an envelope is called for.

Janet K
08-13-2002, 09:23 AM
My jar of yeast says that approximately 2 1/4 teaspoons equals one 1/4 oz. package of yeast.

AD
08-13-2002, 09:33 AM
Yes, 1 packet is 2 1/4 teaspoons; a tablespoon is 3 teaspoons. I guess if you use a whole tablespoon, your bread will rise more and have a more yeasty flavor.

But I doubt the extra yeast would make enough difference to make your bread end up like that loaf on the classic "I Love Lucy" show. Does anyone remember that? :D

Robyncz
08-13-2002, 10:13 AM
Thanks! I knew you guys would know the answer.

Curleytop
08-13-2002, 11:14 AM
2 1/4 teasp. is correct! I called both Red Star and Fleischmann and they sent me some literature on it and also answered my questions by phone.

Leisa M
08-13-2002, 11:56 AM
Accually(sp?) my yeast bread does come up like a rock (classic Lucy show?). What can I do to make sure that won't happen? I make sure to buy fresh yeast. What is gluten and what does it do?

I would like to make fresh bread instead of buying bread all the time, but.........

Jasmine-Rose
08-13-2002, 12:31 PM
This comes from the King Arthur website in a section called Bread Troubleshooting. I'll post the entire list on the Bread Thread, but it could be that one of these is the cause of your trouble. Prior to the class mine all turned out too heavy and dense (like a rock) and in the class I learned that I was adding way too much flour. You should add flour until the dough is still tacky, but not sticky. I hope this helps.

The bread is heavy and dense
Too much flour added
Insufficient rising period
Certain flours (whole wheat, rye, and others) create a heavier loaf than all-purpose unbleached flour

honeygirl1971
08-13-2002, 01:44 PM
Leisa, I don't know very much about bread, but maybe it's the way you are measuring the flour? I used to just dip the measuring cups into my bin of flour and scoop it out, until I read that you get too much flour that way. Now I'm careful to spoon it lightly into the measuring cup, so it doesn't get so "packed" in there, and I've definitely noticed the difference.

Leisa M
08-13-2002, 01:56 PM
I do spoon it in. I read the same thing somewhere, and have spooned it in ever since. Do i need to sift my flour? The recipes I have seen don't say to, but.

vbak
08-13-2002, 02:31 PM
Leisa, there could be a variety of things causing your bread to emulate Lucy's bread. Water temperature plays a big part in bread making. Is it too hot, or is it too cold? If you add eggs, they should should be at room temperature. I put eggs into a pot of warmish/hottish water for a few minutes to warm up. Do you use a bread machine? If so, add liquid ingredients first, then dry ingredients, and end with sugar and yeast. Measuring flour is important , too. Temperature and humidity factor in. I may add less to start, then add more if dough seems sticky. Try making a sponge [2 tbls. of flour, specified amount of water, sugar and yeast] to make sure the water temp. is good. Your sponge will froth and grow. Then add to dry ingredients if you are making bread by hand. I used a thermometer many times to make sure water temp. was right. If you are using a rapid rise recipe , the water temp is hotter because you will be beating the dough for a few minutes. Bread is a science. Keep on trying and you will get it right. Vicky

Jasmine-Rose
08-13-2002, 02:42 PM
Leisa, do you have an instant-read thermometer? I bought one about a year ago and I wouldn't want to be without it. I was using it for testing doneness in meats but at the King Arthur class I realized how useful it is for baking bread.

Mine is digital (Pyrex, I think) and I use it to check the temperature of the water, and to check to see if the bread is done, too. I highly recommend using one.

- E.

Leisa M
08-13-2002, 05:17 PM
How hot does the water need to be? That may be my biggest problem. I may wind up with dead yeast before I even get started good. I think I will try the by-the-hand method. My bread machine makes a round loaf which I don't like, & I don't have the money to buy another just now.

Jasmine-Rose
08-13-2002, 06:11 PM
Originally posted by Leisa M
How hot does the water need to be? That may be my biggest problem.

Leisa, my information from class says the water should be between 90 and 100 degrees. Too cool and it doesn't bring the yeast alive, too hot and it kills the yeast. I also use my thermometer to check to see if the bread is finished baking and the reading for that should be between 195 and 200 degrees.

As for the machine, I've never wanted one, but you really can't go by me because I'm not much of a fan of machines. I do like the process of doing it by hand very much. Even the heat we're having here hasn't stopped me! From the number of replies on the recent threads about baking bread there appears to be enough of us to help each other overcome whatever problems we may encounter along the way, so give the old-fashioned method a try. You may become hooked just as I did :D .

- E.

AD
08-13-2002, 06:29 PM
I just wanted to add that in the "I Love Lucy" show I am referring to, Lucy misread the recipe and used thirteen cakes of yeast instead of three! Even though she realized it after she mixed the dough, she said it shouldn't make much difference. Of course she was surprised that the lump of dough was so heavy after rising. She remarked that it was "a happy loaf." When it was time to take it out of the oven, the loaf came out as if the oven was a drawer, and it extended from the oven through the entire length of the kitchen. I guess rather than a standard 9-inch loaf, it was more like 9 feet long!

Leisa M
08-13-2002, 07:32 PM
Originally posted by AD
I just wanted to add that in the "I Love Lucy" show I am referring to, Lucy misread the recipe and used thirteen cakes of yeast instead of three! Even though she realized it after she mixed the dough, she said it shouldn't make much difference. Of course she was surprised that the lump of dough was so heavy after rising. She remarked that it was "a happy loaf." When it was time to take it out of the oven, the loaf came out as if the oven was a drawer, and it extended from the oven through the entire length of the kitchen. I guess rather than a standard 9-inch loaf, it was more like 9 feet long!

My loafs have come out likke a rock, which is why I refer to them as Lucy loaves. They are just Lucy loaves in reverse.