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mrswaz
07-11-2003, 01:37 PM
Yesterday I found key limes at my regular grocery store for $1.00 a pound. I snagged up a bag, but I'm not sure what to do with them. I will probably end up making a key lime pie- but I wanted to see if anyone has anything a little different to do with them? I don't know if I'm really in the mood for a key lime pie...

Beth
07-11-2003, 01:39 PM
I haven't made them, but I have heard that the CL lemon bars make good lime bars. Limeade is refreshing. Lime curd. I also have a recipe for Key Lime Marmalade that is not for the faint of heart -- more potent than the everage marmalade -- but pure lime. I haven't look at those recipes for years, but I think there may have also been one with key limes and chili peppers.

tamawrite
07-11-2003, 02:40 PM
I've floated them, halved, in citrus-y punch before. For my wedding, in fact. :)

maizeyoats
07-11-2003, 02:52 PM
You didn't say if you wanted something light or not. ..this isn't!

Key Lime Pound Cake with Key Lime Glaze

1 cup butter
1/2 cup shortening
2 cups white sugar
5 eggs
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon. baking powder
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup Lime Juice
1 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

Glaze
1/4 cup white sugar
1/4 cup butter
3 tablespoons Key Lime Juice

d i r e c t i o n s
Preheat oven to 325 oF (165oC).
Grease and flour 10-inch tube pan. Mix together the flour and baking powder. Cream together butter, shortening and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in the eggs one at a time. Beat in the flour mixture alternately with the milk, mixing just until incorporated. Stir in key lime juice and vanilla extract. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake in a preheated oven for 90 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Allow to cool in pan 10 minutes. Turn it out onto wire rack. While warm, ***** top of cake with toothpick. Pour Key Lime Glaze over warm cake. Cool completely.

Key Lime Glaze
In small saucepan, combine sugar, butter and key lime juice. Bring to boil. Continue to boil, stirring constantly, for 1 minute. Remove from heat.

syzygy
07-11-2003, 03:02 PM
Here (http://members.tripod.com/~lee30/keylime_recipes.html) is a link to some recipes -- savory as well as desserts, (that chicken marinade looks yummy) and here (http://members.tripod.com/~lee30/) is another link to a great resource for key lime recipes -- anything bolded on the page is a link. Just scroll down. If you can't find a way to use them babies up here, you never will....:D

Love them key limes!!!

syzygy
07-11-2003, 03:05 PM
Here (http://members.tripod.com/~lee30/keylime_recipes.html) is a link to some recipes -- savory as well as desserts, (that chicken marinade looks yummy) and here (http://members.tripod.com/~lee30/) is another link to a great resource for key lime recipes -- anything bolded on the page is a link. Just scroll down. If you can't find a way to use them babies up here, you never will....:D

Beth
07-11-2003, 03:41 PM
The margarita angel food cake in CL earlier this summer would also be good made with key limes. I need to make that again.

mrswaz
07-12-2003, 07:23 PM
Thanks for the links Leslie! I have them bookmarked.

But I think the pound cake sounds absolutely heavenly! Thanks Maizeyoats for sharing!

(I think I need to go back and get more limes. We may have a lime fest in our house next week!)

mbrogier
07-12-2003, 08:44 PM
I love key lime pie---but I think it can be pretty heavy. I found one where the filling is beaten until light and fluffy and then baked until set. Its unreal. I will tell you that I thought the graham cracker crust was too sweet. I prefer it in a thin pastry crust.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_14029,00.html

Linda in MO
04-16-2004, 12:50 PM
Originally posted by mbrogier
I love key lime pie---but I think it can be pretty heavy. I found one where the filling is beaten until light and fluffy and then baked until set. Its unreal. I will tell you that I thought the graham cracker crust was too sweet. I prefer it in a thin pastry crust.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_14029,00.html

Quick...has anyone else made this pie? I'm getting ready to make it and was wondering if there are any more reviews. :)

Key Lime Pie

Graham Cracker Crust:
1 paper-wrapped package graham crackers (1/3 of a 1 pound box) or 1 cup plus 2 1/2 tablespoons graham cracker crumbs
5 tablespoons melted unsalted butter
1/3 cup sugar

Filling:
3 egg yolks
2 limes, zest grated (about 1 1/2 teaspoons)
1 (14-ounce) can sweetened condensed milk
2/3 cup freshly squeezed lime juice (if you get Key limes, use them: otherwise use regular limes)

Topping:
1 cup heavy or whipping cream, chilled
3 tablespoons of confectioners' sugar


For the graham cracker crust: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Butter a 9-inch pie pan. Break up the graham crackers: place in a food processor and process to crumbs. (If you dont have a food processor, place the crackers in a large plastic bag: seal and then crush the crackers with a rolling pin.) Add the melted butter and sugar and pulse or stir until combined. Press the mixture into the bottom and sides of the pan, forming a neat border around the edge. Bake the crust until set and golden, 8 minutes. Set aside on a wire rack. Leave the oven on.

For the filling: Meanwhile, in a electric mixer with the wire whisk attachment, beat the egg yolks and lime zest at a high speed until very fluffy, abut 5 minutes. Gradually add the condensed milk and continue to beat until thick, 3 or 4 minutes longer. Lower the mixer speed and slowly add the lime juice, mixing just until combined, no longer. Pour mixture into the pie crust. Bake for 10 minutes, or until the filling has set. Cool on a wire rack, then refrigerate. Freeze for 15 to 20 minutes before serving.

For the topping: Whip the cream and the confectioners' sugar until nearly stiff. Cut the pie in wedges and serve very cold, topping each wedge with a large dollop of whipped cream.

funniegrrl
04-16-2004, 01:05 PM
To me this looks like a pretty standard key lime pie, except you bake the filling ...

Linda in MO
04-16-2004, 01:15 PM
Originally posted by funniegrrl
To me this looks like a pretty standard key lime pie, except you bake the filling ...
I think you normally bake the filling, right? (I've never made or even eaten key lime pie). :D The difference with this one it that you whip the filling, so it's fluffier.

MrsReber
04-16-2004, 01:25 PM
CL had a salad with a lime vinegrette dressing. Hmm, now if only I could remember what the salad was! For some reason, I think it was a tropical fruit salad, but I can't remember the issues.

Yes, I know, some help I am! :rolleyes:

funnybone
04-16-2004, 01:27 PM
Originally posted by Linda in MO

I think you normally bake the filling, right?

I've never made one, but I always thought the filling was more like Lemon Meringue, like a curd, done on top of the stove and then baked for the the meringue.

Ironically, I just threw out some Key Lime juice I had bought years ago to make a pie. It sat and sat there (and move with us last year too).:rolleyes: :o :eek:

sneezles
04-16-2004, 01:53 PM
Originally posted by funnybone


I've never made one, but I always thought the filling was more like Lemon Meringue, like a curd, done on top of the stove and then baked for the the meringue.

My favorite is the first one from Gourmet and it's not cooked or baked. I've also made the second one and it's baked. Of the 2 I prefer the first but that's just me!

KEY LIME PIE
This delicious variation of Key lime pie uses regular rather than Key limes.I have made this with both regular and key limes, luscious both ways!
For pastry shell
1/2 cup cold lard or unsalted butter
2 1/2 tablespoons cold unsalted butter
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
about 1/3 cup ice water
pie weights or raw rice for weighting shell

For filling
1 pound cream cheese, softened
3/4 cup fresh lime juice
a 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk
1 teaspoon finely grated fresh lime zest

1 cup crème fraîche
1/4 cup confectioners' sugar

Garnish: 8 lime slices

Make pastry shell
Cut butter or lard into bits. In a bowl with a pastry blender or your fingertips blend all pastry shell ingredients except ice water until mixture resembles coarse meal. Stir in enough ice water, 1 tablespoon at a time, to form a dough. Form dough into a disk. Chill dough, wrapped in plastic wrap, at least 1 hour and up to 1 day.

On a lightly floured surface roll out dough into a 15-inch round (about 1/8 inch thick) and fit into a 9-inch (1-quart) glass pie plate. Trim dough, leaving a 1/2-inch overhang, and crimp edge. ***** shell all over with a fork. Chill shell 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 350°F.

Line shell with foil and fill with pie weights or raw rice. Bake shell in lower third of oven 20 minutes. Carefully remove foil and weights or rice and bake shell until golden, about 10 to 15 minutes more. Cool shell completely on a rack.

Make filling
In a food processor blend cream cheese, lime juice, and condensed milk until smooth. Add zest and pulse just until combined. Pour filling into shell. In a bowl with an electric mixer beat crème fraîche with confectioners' sugar until it forms soft peaks and spread evenly over filling. Arrange lime slices on top of pie. Chill pie, loosely covered, at least 6 hours and up to 1 day.



Gourmet
June 1998


KEY LIME PIE
Key limes are also known as Mexican or West Indian limes. If you can't find them in your area, substitute bottled Key lime juice. We've tried several different brands in our test kitchens, and prefer the taste of Manhattan.* This recipe is modified from the classic one found on many condensed milk and Key lime juice labels; we've added additional lime juice for more tartness.
Active time: 20 min Start to finish: 10 hr (includes chilling)

For crust
1 1/4 cups graham cracker crumbs from 9 (2 1/4-inch by 4 3/4-inch) crackers
2 tablespoons sugar
5 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

For filling
1 (14-oz) can sweetened condensed milk
4 large egg yolks
1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons fresh or bottled Key lime juice (if using bottled, preferably Manhattan brand)

For topping
3/4 cup chilled heavy cream

Make crust:
Preheat oven to 350°F.

Stir together graham cracker crumbs, sugar, and butter in a bowl with a fork until combined well, then press mixture evenly onto bottom and up side of a 9-inch (4-cup) glass pie plate.

Bake crust in middle of oven 10 minutes and cool in pie plate on a rack. Leave oven on.

Make filling and bake pie:
Whisk together condensed milk and yolks in a bowl until combined well. Add juice and whisk until combined well (mixture will thicken slightly).

Pour filling into crust and bake in middle of oven 15 minutes. Cool pie completely on rack (filling will set as it cools), then chill, covered, at least 8 hours.

Make topping:
Just before serving, beat cream in a bowl with an electric mixer until it just holds stiff peaks. Serve pie topped with cream.

Cooks' note:
• Pie (without topping) can be chilled up to 1 day.

*Available at Manhattan Key Lime (212-696-5378).

Makes 8 servings.


Gourmet
May 2003

funniegrrl
04-16-2004, 02:14 PM
Here's the deal:

There are two types of lemon meringue pie -- one that is, as you say, a curd that is cooked on the stove, and another that is made with sweetened condensed milk that is NOT traditionally cooked. The combination of the s.c. milk, the egg yolks, and the acid (lemon juice) thicken the filling and no cooking is needed.

Key lime pie is traditionally made like the second type of lemon meringue (sometimes called "lemon icebox") pie. Again, it is made with egg yolks, s.c. milk, and lime juice and is not cooked. Some top this key lime pie with meringue, as with the lemon pie, others with whipped cream.

(Note: I'm from Atlanta, and I'd never HEARD of the first type until I was a teenager. So, the curd-type of pie has always had a vaguely "yankee" connotation to me. In fact, it is said that key lime pie, and by extension, the lemon icebox pie, were invented to use up stores of s.c. milk commonly found in tropical areas in the days before refrigeration.)

I'm guessing that, since no one is supposed to eat raw eggs anymore, however, the directions for such pies will now include a cooking component. I doubt that 10 minutes in the oven is enough to deal with any food safety issues, though, so I don't see that it matters in this particular recipe. But, I don't know the exact rules about how long / how high heat you're supposed to cook eggs before they are deemed safe.

sneezles
04-16-2004, 02:27 PM
Originally posted by funniegrrl
Here's the deal:

The combination of the s.c. milk, the egg yolks, and the acid (lemon juice) thicken the filling and no cooking is needed.

I don't know the exact rules about how long / how high heat you're supposed to cook eggs before they are deemed safe.

Sorry but I'm having difficulty believing that if I mix up a can of s.c milk, egg yolks and lemon juice that I'm gonna get a thick filling :confused: ...

Egg yolks must be heat to 160º or be held at 140º for about 3 minutes.

Linda in MO
04-16-2004, 03:12 PM
Originally posted by sneezles
Sorry but I'm having difficulty believing that if I mix up a can of s.c milk, egg yolks and lemon juice that I'm gonna get a thick filling :confused: ...

I agree. I don't think the filling I just made would have set up at all if I had just refrigerated instead of baking it first. In fact I had to bake it an extra 7 minutes to get it to set up and it was still pretty jiggly (which is how I think it's supposed to be). I'm sure there are several variations on Key Lime Pie, but every recipe I found, instructed you to bake the filling in the crust.

And in reference to the pie I made (the one I posted above)...I'm not sure if I did something wrong, but I wouldn't have called the filling "fluffy". I followed the directions but I expected it to have a fluffier/lighter texture. I don't have anything to compare it to though. ;) It's in the fridge right now and I'm taking it to a friend's house tonight. I will post a review tomorrow.

Does anyone know how far in advance I can put the whipped cream on the pie? Should I wait until right before it's served?

funniegrrl
04-16-2004, 03:28 PM
Originally posted by sneezles
Sorry but I'm having difficulty believing that if I mix up a can of s.c milk, egg yolks and lemon juice that I'm gonna get a thick filling

Well ... the recipe has only been around since, I dunno, the 1920's or '30s if not earlier, and it's the only kind of lemon or lime pie I had ever had until I was an adult. My mother made one or the other a couple of times per month.

If you go to the Eagle Brand web site, the recipes they have posted now instruct you to cook both the lemon & the lime pie. But at home I have various Borden recipe booklets with the traditional recipe, which is NOT cooked, and which thickens just fine.

I'll type 'em up this weekend.

sneezles
04-16-2004, 03:28 PM
Originally posted by Linda in MO
Does anyone know how far in advance I can put the whipped cream on the pie? Should I wait until right before it's served?

You can whip it up a couple of hours with no problem. Sunday's leftover whipped cream was just as tasty Monday night! ;)

KAnn
04-16-2004, 03:30 PM
I made the Double Key Lime Pie from the April BA and it was fabulous!!! The biggest hit of Easter brunch....I did a traditional graham cracker crust rather than the suggested graham cracker/granola crust.

Katie

sweetpea
04-16-2004, 03:45 PM
I also made the Double Key Lime Pie from April BA (and i remember right, the bottom half is baked and the top half is not) and my family LOVED it. It was a little too rich for me, but was still very very tasty! The granola in the crust is something i would repeat on other recipes also. I also used regular limes rather than key limes....i actually bought a bag of key limes one time and it took 2 hours to squeeze all the juice from those little boogers--they were a little hard too so that made it more difficult! :)

Here's the recipe in case anyone wants it:


* Exported from MasterCook *

Two-Layer Key Lime Pie

Recipe By :
Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
Crust
3/4 cup granola -- with no raisins or other dried fruit
3/4 cup graham cracker crumbs -- from about 6 whole graham crackers
1/4 cup unsalted butter -- melted
3 tablespoons sugar
Baked Layer
1 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk
1/2 cup fresh lime juice -- Key limes or regular
3 large egg yolks
Chilled Layer
8 ounces cream cheese -- room temperature
1/2 cup sweetened condensed milk
1/4 cup fresh lime juice -- Key lime or regular
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Whipped cream -- sweetened

For Crust: Preheat oven to 350 degrees Using on/off turns, blend granola in food processor until coarsely ground. Transfer granola to medium bowl. Mix in graham cracker crumbs, melted butter, and sugar. Press crumb mixture over bottom and up sides of 9-inch-diameter deep dish glass pie dish. Bake until crust is golden brown, about 8 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 300 deg. Remove crust from oven and cool completely.

For Baked Layer: Whisk condensed milk, lime juice, and egg yolks in medium bowl to blend. Pour into crust. Bake until custard is set, about 25 minutes. Cool to room temperature.

For Chilled Layer: Using electric mixer, beat cream cheese, condensed milk, lime juice, sugar and vanilla in a large bowl. Pour over cooled baked layer; smooth top. Cover and chill until firm, at least 4 hours. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Keep refrigerated.)

Pipe sweetened whipped cream decoratively around edges of the pie. Cut into wedges and serve.

Source:
"April 2004 Bon Appetit from Keylime Bistro at Captiva Island Inn, Florida"

sneezles
04-16-2004, 04:14 PM
Originally posted by funniegrrl


Well ... the recipe has only been around since, I dunno, the 1920's or '30s if not earlier, and it's the only kind of lemon or lime pie I had ever had until I was an adult. My mother made one or the other a couple of times per month.


Ya learn somein' new every day...found this:

KEY LIME PIE

In "A Gourmet's Guide: Food and Drink from A to Z" by John Ayto (Oxford University Press, 1993), Key lime pie is described as "An American pie containing a lime-flavored custard topped with meringue. It takes its name from Key West, a seaport in Florida."

There is a little more to it than that.

It is the official dessert of Key West. Restaurants around the country serve Key Lime Pie in many forms, some true to the original and some truly bizarre variations. Everyone has their favorite restaurant version, and usually their own favorite home version. Key limes are very sour, and Key lime juice can be used to make a perfect custard-like filling for pies. Because of the Keys isolation before the railroad was opened in 1912, fresh milk was hard to come by. So Gail Borden's invention of sweetened condensed (canned) milk in 1859 came in handy. It also meant that you could make a custard pie without the necessity of cooking it. The Key lime juice by itself was enough to curdle the condensed milk and egg yolks. No one knows who made the first one. They were probably made with pie crusts at first, but soon the Graham cracker crust became the standard.

The basic recipe is simple, Key lime juice, egg yolks, sweetened condensed milk (preferably Borden's) and sugar, with a Graham cracker crust. Topped with meringue or whipped cream (voice your preference in Key West to start a long discussion of the merits and authenticity of each). The Key West Lime Pie Shop makes an eggless version for some restaurants and for mail order. Some restaurants make it with a pastry crust. Most now bake it to 160 degrees because of the worry of salmonella in eggs. But no one dyes it green. Key lime pie is deep yellow in color.

catts
04-16-2004, 06:45 PM
I made the two layer Key Lime pie posted above and it is very good. It is also easy to make. The granola crust was a nice addition. I will make this again. I did use key limes, Fred's had them on sale. However, they do take forever to squeeze.

funniegrrl
04-16-2004, 08:18 PM
Originally posted by sneezles
Ya learn somein' new every day

Seeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee?

There's a reason my family won't play Trivial Pursuit with me any more ...

LOL

Linda in MO
04-17-2004, 12:10 PM
The pie was a huge hit! For the crust I added an extra 2 or 3 sheets of crushed graham crackers because it was pretty wet. Next time I may just cut the butter back to 4 T. Also, I only used 2 T. sugar in the crust but I don't think the extra sugar would have bothered me at all had I used it. For the whipped cream I used 1 cup whipping cream, a heaping T. of powdered sugar, and a t. of vanilla. I put it on a few hours before it was served and it held up just fine (thanks sneezles!). There was one tiny piece leftover and I left it there, but I'm wishing I had it right now! :p
Oh, and I just used regular limes.

Beth
04-17-2004, 12:47 PM
Originally posted by sneezles

Ya learn somein' new every day...

Now, Susan, you surprise me. I thought you would have known this. Actually, I only learned about key lime pie after we had it on our honeymoon, and when I checked out recipes, many were not cooked except for the browning of the meringue. I used whipped cream instead of meringue, and I decided I would feel better about it setting completely if I baked it the 10 minutes in my recipe. Wasn't as concerned about the eggs then, but have continued to make the pie that way for whatever reason. I can tell you it will thicken up on you if you just let it sit though -- ohone calls, kids and other interuptions have proven it. :D

funniegrrl
04-17-2004, 01:07 PM
OK, here's the recipe, straight out of my 1987 Borden Recipe Collection Sampler. This contains all the classic Borden recipes that use Eagle Brand and other such borden products. As I said, my mother made this pie (usually lemon, but sometimes lime) frequently throughout my childhood in the 1960s and 1970s, and as noted above, the recipe has been around for approximately 1 million years before that. I bet if you had the recipe as printed during my childhood, it would include the recipe for making the crust from scratch. But, by the time this booklet came out, prepared graham cracker crusts were widely available. I don't remember that she had a copy of the recipe, because it was *always* on the inside of the can label.

Creamy Lemon Pie

1 (8- or 9-inch) graham cracker crumb crust
3 egg yolks*
1 (14-ounce) can Eagle Brand Sweetened Condensed Milk (NOT evaporated milk)
1/2 cup ReaLemon Lemon Juice from Concentrate
Few drops yellow food coloring, optional
Whipped topping or whipped cream

In bowl, beat egg yolks; add sweetened condensed milk, RealLemon and food coloring if desired. Pour into crust. Chill 4 hours or until set. Top with whipped topping. Refrigerate leftovers.

CREAMY LEMON MERINGUE PIE
Omit Whipped topping. In a small mixer bowl, beat 3 egg whites with 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar until soft peaks form; gradually add 1/3 cup sugar, beating until stiff but not dry. Spread on top of pie, sealing carefully to edge of crust. Bake in a preheated 350 oven 12 to 15 minutes or until golden. Cool. Chill.

Easy Key Lime Pie
The recipe in the booklet is identical to the lemon pie, except that it calls for 1/2 cup lime juice instead of the lemon juice, and green food coloring instead of yellow.

*Use Grade A clean, uncracked eggs.


Notes:
We always made both pies with a meringue.
My mother never put yellow food coloring in the lemon pie, but did put green in the lime. Just a little, though. I don't use any, and I don't think ANYone does these days.
Of course the recipe calls for ReaLemon & ReaLime, because it's to promote Borden products. But, when I make these pies now I use fresh juice and it is REALLY good. If you use actual key limes, then you'll have real key lime pie. If you use common limes, it's not really key lime pie.


Now, as a bonus, I'll post the REAL favorite pie of the family, which is also in this booklet:

Cherry Cheese Pie
1 (9-inch) graham cracker crumb crust OR baked pastry shell
1 8-ounce package cream cheese, softened
1 (14-ounce) can Eagle Brand Sweetened Condensed Milk (NOT evaporated milk)
1/3 cup ReaLemon Lemon Juice 1 tsp vanilla extract
1 (21-ounce) can cherry pie filling, chilled

In large mixer bowl, beat cheese until fluffy. Gradually beat in sweetened condensed milk until smooth. Stir in ReaLemon and vanilla. Pour into prepared curst. Chill 3 hours or until set. Top with pie filling. Refrigerate leftovers.

Notes: My mother always topped the pie with the cherry filling before cutting it. But, when I make it now, I usually cut & plate the pie & then top each slice with a dollop of pie filling.
For the lemon juice, of course I use fresh now, and it's incredibly good.