PDA

View Full Version : Chewing gum..



beejayw1
10-31-2003, 02:48 PM
Gum balls from machines?

wallycat
10-31-2003, 02:49 PM
Does anyone know if there is a chewing gum in existence that does NOT contain aspertame?? :(

(Dentyne, eclipse, wrigley's, trident....those all do)

yorkshirepud
10-31-2003, 02:50 PM
Hubba Bubba, Bubbalicious ... all the cool kiddy gum! My personal fav!

cangoss
10-31-2003, 03:04 PM
You can get something called Xylitol gum at natural foods stores (I've seen it at Whole Foods). Xylitol is a natural sweetener made from birch trees (?) and it's supposed to be good for your teeth.

Kristine
10-31-2003, 03:09 PM
There is a sugarless brand called Peelu that doesn't have any aspartame. I buy it at Mother's Market (it's a health food type store), but they may have it at Whole Foods or Trader Joe's (not sure though).

Here are the ingredients: Sorbitol, gum base, maltitol syrup, natural oil of spearmint, lecithin, peelu extract, titanium dioxide, resinous glaze, carnauba wax

I love the stuff - I think I am addicted. The only problem is that is kind of dissolves if you chew it for too long, but that doesn't really bother me. I just spit it out when that starts to happen!

sneezles
10-31-2003, 03:11 PM
Dentyne does not contain asparatame.

Note: Back to say that some of Dentyne's products do contain aspartame, usually the mint flavors. The cinnamon flavor does not. Here's the ingredient list for Dentyne Fire:

GENERAL INFORMATION
This product information is intended only for residents of the United States.

Product Description:
Spicy Cinnamon, Breath Freshening, Sugarless Gum.

Highlights:
• Available in 12 piece packs and multipacks.
• 35% fewer calories than sugared gum. Two piece calorie content for this size piece has been reduced from 8 to 5 calories.

Ingredients:
Sorbitol, Maltitol, Gum Base, Mannitol, Artificial and Natural Flavorings, Acacia; Less Than 2% of: Acesulfame Potassium, BHT (To Maintain Freshness), Blue 2 Lake, Candelilla Wax, Glycerin, Red 40 Lake, Soy Lecithin, Sucralose and Titanium Dioxide (Color). NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION
Dentyne Fire

Canice
10-31-2003, 04:14 PM
Originally posted by Kristine
There is a sugarless brand called Peelu that doesn't have any aspartame. I buy it at Mother's Market (it's a health food type store), but they may have it at Whole Foods or Trader Joe's (not sure

Definitely either TJ's or WF. I've bought it at one of them, but don't remember which. They look like Chicklets! anyone remember Chicklets?

wallycat
10-31-2003, 05:27 PM
Thanks everyone!

Sneezles:
Acesulfame Potassium is aspartame :eek: so looks like the cinnamon also contains it.

I LOOOOOVE the zylitol gum but my buying club/co-op stopped carrying it. I was buying it by the cases. I thought they were discontinued. I'll look at TJ's and Whole foods...thanks.
I also tried Peelu, but didn't like the dissolve factor :rolleyes:

Gail
10-31-2003, 09:26 PM
Originally posted by Canice


Definitely either TJ's or WF. I've bought it at one of them, but don't remember which. They look like Chicklets! anyone remember Chicklets?

CHICLETS, Canice. And apparently, they're still out there.

http://www.prodhelp.com/images/ChicletsLrg2.gif

JHolcomb
10-31-2003, 11:05 PM
Wrigleys. Unless you're looking for something w/non-aspertame sugar subsititute. Doublemint, Spearmint, Juicy Fruit...

sneezles
11-01-2003, 01:55 AM
Originally posted by wallycat
Sneezles:
Acesulfame Potassium is aspartame :eek: so looks like the cinnamon also contains it.

Ana,
I don't think that is correct.

Aspartame, used in most diet drinks, is sold as NutraSweet and Equal. It's not as sweet as saccharin and is more expensive. Through the years, it has been blamed for a host of conditions, including brain tumors, seizures, birth defects, multiple sclerosis and lupus, though there's no evidence to back up these claims. Some people also report side effects such as headaches, dizziness and indigestion, but no one knows how widespread they are. The only proven risk is to the small number of people with conditions, such as advanced liver disease, that cause problems metabolizing phenylalanine, an amino acid in aspartame. they are the targets of required warning labels.

Acesulfame potassium is sold as Sunett and as the tabletop product Sweet One. In some products it's combined with other sweeteners. Unlike aspartame, it doesn't break down when heated, so it can be used for baking. It has been tesed less thoroughly than aspartame, so researchers tend to know less about it.

Acesulfame potassium is a non-caloric sweetener with a clean, quickly perceptible sweet taste. Its excellent stability under high temperatures and good solubility make acesulfame potassium suitable for numerous products.

Discovered in 1967 by Hoechst AG, acesulfame potassium (also known as acesulfame K) is a high-intensity, non-caloric sweetener. It is approximately 200 times sweeter than sucrose. Acesulfame potassium has a clean, quickly perceptible, sweet taste that does not linger or leave an aftertaste. Acesulfame potassium is not metabolized by the body and is excreted unchanged. It is sold under the brand name Sunett™ by Nutrinova, Inc., a Hoechst
subsidiary.

Acesulfame potassium is currently used in thousands of foods, beverages, oral hygiene and pharmaceutical products in about 90 countries. Among these are tabletop sweeteners, desserts, puddings, baked goods, soft drinks, candies and canned foods. In the United States, acesulfame potassium is approved for use in numerous products including chewing gum, dry beverage mixes, dry dessert mixes, dry dairy analog bases, tabletop sweeteners, confections, soft candy, hard candy (including breath mints, cough drops and lozenges), baked goods, dairy products, carbonated
beverages and alcoholic beverages. It received U.S. approval for use in soft drinks on July 6, 1998.


BENEFITS

Helps Reduce Calories — Since acesulfame potassium is not metabolized, it contributes no calories. By substituting acesulfame potassium for sugar in foods and beverages, calories can be reduced substantially, or, in some products, practically eliminated.

Remains Stable Under High Temperatures — The sweet taste of acesulfame potassium remains unchanged during baking. Even at oven temperatures over 200ēC, acesulfame potassium shows no indications of breaking down or losing its sweet taste. Beverages containing acesulfame potassium also can be pasteurized under normal pasteurizing conditions without loss of sweetness.

Excellent Shelf Life — Acesulfame potassium has a high degree of stability over a wide range of pH and temperature storage conditions.

Tastes Sweet and Clean — Acesulfame potassium has a clean, quickly perceptible sweet taste that does not linger. Acesulfame potassium generally does not exhibit any off-taste in foods and soft drinks.

Synergistic — Acesulfame potassium can provide a synergistic sweetening effect when combined with other non-nutritive sweeteners.

Does Not Promote Tooth Decay — Acesulfame potassium does not contribute to dental caries.

Useful in Diabetic Diets — Studies have shown that acesulfame potassium has no effect on serum glucose, cholesterol, total glycerol or free glycerol levels. People with diabetes may incorporate products containing acesulfame potassium into their balanced diet.


SAFETY

More than 90 studies have demonstrated the safety of acesulfame potassium. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration permitted the use of acesulfame potassium after evaluating numerous studies and determining it is safe for its intended use.

The FDA has set an acceptable daily intake (ADI) for acesulfame potassium of 15 milligrams per kilogram of body weight. ADI, expressed in terms of body weight, is the amount of a food additive that can be taken daily in the diet over a lifetime without risk. FDA's ADI for acesulfame potassium is equivalent to a 132-pound person eating 143 pounds of sugar annually (i.e., more than the average person consumes of all sugar and corn sweeteners combined).

The FDA approved acesulfame potassium for use in liquid non-alcoholic beverages (soft drinks) on July 6, 1998.
FDA has reaffirmed acesulfame potassium's safety on eight separate occasions by broadening its approval.

The Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), the scientific advisory body to the World Health Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, reviewed the available research on acesulfame potassium and concluded that it is safe. JECFA has also established an ADI of 15 mg/kg of body weight.

The Scientific Committee for Food of the European Union published a comprehensive assessment of sweetening agents in 1985. This committee of toxicological experts from the EEC member countries accepted acesulfame potassium for use in foods and beverages. Acesulfame potassium has been used in Europe since 1983, and in the U.S. since 1988, with no known documented adverse health effects.


FUTURE

Testing of acesulfame potassium has shown good performance in juices, fruit preparations and dairy products. It is also an excellent sweetener for use in baked goods, a market which has great potential for low-calorie sweeteners, and is well suited for use in toothpaste, mouthwashes and pharmaceuticals.

Acesulfame potassium's good taste, stability and solubility make it suitable for numerous products. The availability of a variety of low-calorie sweeteners will expand the market to provide products with improved taste, increased stability, lower manufacturing costs, and, ultimately, more choices for the consumer.

REFERENCES



Copyright Š 1999 Calorie Control Council

valchemist
11-01-2003, 05:29 AM
Sneezles is correct. Aspartame and Acesulfame Potassium are two totally different compounds. Their chemical structures aren't even vaguely similar.

wallycat
11-01-2003, 07:02 AM
Thanks. I appreciate the info as I have been interchanging the info on those two a lot. The other stuff is even LESS researched though...sigh; maybe I'll give up gum.

JHColmb, I'll have to relook at the wrigley's...I thought they too contained the aspertame or the other fake stuff...
I don't mind chewing zylitol, but I wish they'd just leave it with the sugar :rolleyes:

JHolcomb
11-01-2003, 08:25 AM
Originally posted by wallycat
Thanks. I appreciate the info as I have been interchanging the info on those two a lot. The other stuff is even LESS researched though...sigh; maybe I'll give up gum.

JHColmb, I'll have to relook at the wrigley's...I thought they too contained the aspertame or the other fake stuff...


Nope. Puuuuuure sugar. Their EXTRA brand does have fake stuff, but not the originals.