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View Full Version : Dry Cake, any way to moisten?



Middydd
01-16-2004, 12:16 PM
I made a new recipe for a Chocolate Peanut Butter Bundt cake, not light by any means, called for two sticks of butter and 5 eggs!!

Anyways, it's not the greatest and it's dry. Anyway to moisten it?

I thought of poking holes in it and drizzling with a syrup but it's got a glaze on it.

I put a cup of water in the cake dome with it but I don't imagine that'll help much.

Any other ideas?

louiseee
01-16-2004, 12:22 PM
Well I know if you want to keep a cake moist you cut an apple in half and put half in the cake tin with the cake. I don't know if this will help moisten up a dry cake but it might be worth a try.

jphilg
01-16-2004, 12:25 PM
I might poke the holes anyway and re-glaze after soaking with a syrup. Maybe a Kaluha syrup....:D

MKSquared
01-16-2004, 12:51 PM
Serve it a la mode? :)

I'd go with the poking holes-drizzle method - if it's already not awesome, what will it hurt to drizzle over a glaze? :D

Gilgamesh37
01-16-2004, 12:57 PM
My other thought was, how sticky is the glaze? If it's sort of set-up, maybe you could invert the cake back into the bundt pan, and poke holes in the bottom, then add a syrup? That way, you moisten the cake but preserve the top glaze (assuming it survives it's headstand back in the pan). Otherwise, I'd go with poking & re-glazing.

Also, instead of a syrup, if you wanted to try to add something to moisten but not add more calories, maybe drizzling the poked bottom with cold coffee? Just a thought--I love coffee flavor added to chocolate stuff when I'm baking it, brings out the chocolate flavor I think--but I don't know if that would work here, or if it would just end up tasting like you dropped your cake in your coffeecup....:confused:

claire797
01-16-2004, 01:02 PM
Isn't it frustrating when a full-fat cake comes out dry? Grrrrr. I thought making things moist was fat's job. I feel your pain!

I vote for the poke, drizzle and re-glaze. The question is, what kind of syrup?

Middydd
01-16-2004, 01:17 PM
Well, your replies gave me the nerve to poke and soak. The cake was sweet enough (in fact rather too sweet, kind of cloying) so, instead of syrup I poked holes and poured hot water over it.

It melted the chocolate glaze a bit so I just smoothed over the holes.

The inside of the cake dome is now steamy with condensation and I hope the moist environment adds moisture to the cake.

Will report back tonight when we try a piece. Thanks for all the suggestions, you're a great bunch. I enjoy the down to earth and snobfree discussions here.

sneezles
01-16-2004, 09:22 PM
Originally posted by Middydd
Will report back tonight when we try a piece. Thanks for all the suggestions, you're a great bunch. I enjoy the down to earth and snobfree discussions here.

Curious to know how your fix-it turned out!

Middydd
01-17-2004, 11:17 AM
Yup, it actually did work. It was a marbled cake, partly chocolate, partly yellow cake.

The chocolate part got nicely fudgey after the addition of the water. It had been quite dry around the edges of the cake.

Unfortunately, nobody who tried the cake liked the taste of it with peanut butter in the batter. Definitely not a keeper recipe.

valchemist
01-17-2004, 11:20 AM
strange. what's wrong with chocolate and PB? did you like the taste?

claire797
01-17-2004, 11:31 AM
Originally posted by valchemist
strange. what's wrong with chocolate and PB? did you like the taste?

Yes. Do tell! Were they just not peanut butter cake fans?

At least the water worked.

Middydd
01-17-2004, 11:38 AM
I like a chocolate cake with peanut butter frosting but this recipe had the peanut butter in both batters, you cream it with the regular butter. Then divide the batter and add chocolate to half. It was kind of unexpected because you couldn't see the peanut butter and also the peanut butter overwhelmed even the chocolate in the cake.

I think I'll tinker with the recipe and leave the peanut butter out of the chocolate part of the batter. If I come up with a decent tasting variation, I'll post it.

Cafe Latte
01-17-2004, 11:41 AM
Is the recipe posted somewhere? I'd love to see it.

Middydd
01-17-2004, 09:06 PM
I'll post it, maybe you can figure out where I went wrong and it came out so dry. It's a pretty standard recipe, methodwise.

Peanut Butter Chocolate Bundt Cake

Grease and flour a Bundt pan. Preheat oven to 350.

Ingredients:

4 squares (1 ounce each) unsweetened chocolate
1 cup sugar
1 cup packed brown sugar
2 sticks, (1 cup butter)
1 cup smooth peanut butter
5 large eggs
2 cups all purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup buttermilk
1/3 cup Ghirardelli double chocolate chips (or any chocolate chips)

Frosting/Glaze:

1/8 cup butter
1/8 cup peanut butter
1/8 cup corn syrup
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 tablespoon hot water
6 ounces bittersweet chocolate

Melt unsweetened chocolate in microwave. Set aside.

Cream butter and peanut butter until well mixed and fluffy. Gradually add both types of sugar and beat well. Add eggs one at a time and beat after each addition.

Sift flour, baking powder and salt together twice. Add to butter/sugar mixture alternating with buttermilk, begin and end with flour.

Pour half of batter into a separate bowl. Mix in melted chocolate, beat until blended. Add chocolate chips to other portion of batter, stir.

Spoon each batter into Bundt pan, alternating each type of batter. Swirl with knife. Rap pan on counter to ensure no air spaces in batter.

Bake for fifty to sixty minutes, rotating after 25 minutes. Cake tester should come out with some crumbs attached and some melted chocolate from the chips. Sides will pull back slightly from pan. Cool in pan ten minutes, turn out onto rack.

Melt together glaze ingredients in small saucepan over low heat. Whisk vigorously until smooth. Pour over cake by tablespoons.

valchemist
01-18-2004, 07:25 AM
thanks for posting! the recipe looks really good, which I am sure is why you tried it. I know you are an experienced baker, Middy, so I am sure you measured and mixed it up just right. any chance that it was just in the oven a bit too long?

also, just wondering, where did the recipe come from? Ghirardelli, I guess?

claire797
01-18-2004, 07:49 AM
This may make you feel better. It's not the same recipe you made, it's another peanut butter chocolate bundt cake recipe that had tons of fat but was still dry. Only 53% of Epicurious people would make it again and many of the reviews complain about dryness. Maybe the peanut butter causes dryness?

Chocolate Peanut Butter Bundt Cake (http://www.epicurious.com/run/recipe/view?id=104571&kw=peanut+butter+chocolate+bundt+cake&action=filtersearch&filter=recipe-filter.hts&collection=Recipes&ResultTemplate=recipe-results.hts&queryType=and&keyword=peanut+butter+chocolate+bundt+cake)

Middydd
01-18-2004, 11:50 AM
Originally posted by claire797
This may make you feel better. It's not the same recipe you made, it's another peanut butter chocolate bundt cake recipe that had tons of fat but was still dry.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Bundt Cake (http://www.epicurious.com/run/recipe/view?id=104571&kw=peanut+butter+chocolate+bundt+cake&action=filtersearch&filter=recipe-filter.hts&collection=Recipes&ResultTemplate=recipe-results.hts&queryType=and&keyword=peanut+butter+chocolate+bundt+cake)

Sheesh!! That recipe came out dry with two and a half sticks of butter, lots of eggs, sour cream AND cream cheese???

I wonder if it's the peanut butter that causes dryness? Or the combination of peanut butter and chocolate? I know I must have gone through countless chocolate cake recipes before finding "the one" that's always moist.

Anybody have a cake with peanut butter in the batter turn out well?

Middydd
01-18-2004, 12:09 PM
[i]Originally posted by valchemist
any chance that it was just in the oven a bit too long?

also, just wondering, where did the recipe come from? Ghirardelli, I guess? [/B]

Valchemist, I think it probably was baked too long. Only thing is, the light batter was pretty much right on whereas the chocolate batter was way too dry. I think if you baked it a shorter time you might end up with the light batter gummy.

I've noticed this problem before with marbled cakes.

I'd tinker with the baking time if the taste was better but...

I know my oven is right on because I have two thermometers in there. Just wondering if I should have reduced the temperature to 325 because I used a dark pan. What do you think? Do you reduce the temperature routinely for dark pans?

I don't think the recipe came from Ghirardelli, the chips are specified in a hand written note on the photocopy. Where it did come from I can't recall. It's been in the "queue" for quite some time.

valchemist
01-18-2004, 12:16 PM
interesting about the marbled cakes and how each batter might require a different time. never thought about that. I have never adjusted the temperature for a dark pan, but I don't know if that would make a difference or not. perhaps.

claire797
01-18-2004, 12:40 PM
I think you should try making the cake again at 325.

I haven't made a scratch bundt pan in a while, but I did make a cake mix based lemon pound cake and the directions on the the Duncan Hines box said to reduce the temperature to 325 if using dark pans. I wouldn't have known to do this had the box not specifically instructed.

I guess the same rule applies to scratch cakes.

Actually, I just checked Baking911 and it does.

http://www.baking911.com/cakes_bundt.htm

Check out paragraph #4. Make sure you have some Visine handy, because this page is an eyesore. Can't wait until they revamp this site! I love it and hate it.

Middydd
01-18-2004, 12:55 PM
Originally posted by claire797
[

http://www.baking911.com/cakes_bundt.htm

Check out paragraph #4. Make sure you have some Visine handy, because this page is an eyesore. Can't wait until they revamp this site! I love it and hate it. [/B]

Isn't that the truth!! Good information, though. Thanks for posting that link, I'd never come across the steam method for getting cakes out of Bundt pans. Every hint to get a perfect release comes in handy.

Can you find the information for converting to Mini-Bundts? I click on the link specified but can't figure out where it talks about the mini pans. It's a link within a red box and a picture of the mini-Bundt pan.

claire797
01-18-2004, 01:00 PM
I found the link, but the site is so painful to read that I just stopped. I need to go take some Advil.