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View Full Version : Whole wheat english muffins?



Jollyjo
05-17-2004, 11:40 AM
I can't seem to find these anywhere! Can some of you share brands and where you find them? I love english muffins, but am trying to stay away from white flour, so these would be perfect. TIA!

masimmons
05-17-2004, 11:41 AM
Trader Joe's. Since I don't live very close to one (around 4 hour drive) I buy lots of them and freeze. Good luck!

KristinK
05-17-2004, 12:09 PM
Trader Joe's for me too. They have whole wheat cinnamon raisin ones too.

cangoss
05-17-2004, 12:30 PM
I get them at Whole Foods. I've also gotten Thomas brand honey-wheat english muffins, but they have more sugar than I'd like.

granolagirl
05-17-2004, 02:26 PM
Not sure if they are whole wheat, but they are wheat. Village Hearth Wheat english muffins.

Shirley Ekstein
05-17-2004, 03:24 PM
Just a general question - what exactly do these 'English Muffins' look like? - (seeing as I've never heard of them and haven't the remotest notion of what they might be - unless - mm - wonder if is possible that they might be what we call tea cakes?)

RebeccaT
05-17-2004, 04:02 PM
Hi Shirley!

"English" muffins look more like crumpets than muffins. I hadn't a clue how they got their name, so I looked them up and found this:


ENGLISH MUFFINS
The story is that an English baker, a certain Samuel B. Thomas, started making these flat chewy things in America over 100 years ago, from his mother's tea cake recipe. The English deny that they ever heard or saw anything like it until they were imported from America. Today you can find Thomas' English Muffins in most English supermarkets. Imported from America.

The curious thing is that 'muffins' in the U.S. are not anything like these so-called 'English Muffins'. (Maybe this was an inexperienced English immigrant baker's attempt to make crumpets* from a half remembered recipe of his mother's.) Muffins in America are 'quick breads' that is, made with no yeast, but leavened with egg and baking powder.

‘English Muffins’ are about 3 inches round and 1 inch high, yeast raised (basically a bread dough) and baked on a griddle. To get the proper texture when split in two they should not be cut with a knife, but should be split with a fork. The resulting rough texture gives them a certain crunchiness when toasted (and helps them hold gobs of butter and preserves).
They are an essential ingredient in Eggs Benedict .

* (What's a crumpet? That's another story.)
http://www.foodreference.com/html/artenglishmuffins.html


http://www.imaginatorium.org/words/pics/b02007muff.jpg

Arete
05-17-2004, 04:27 PM
Originally posted by Shirley Ekstein
Just a general question - what exactly do these 'English Muffins' look like? - (seeing as I've never heard of them and haven't the remotest notion of what they might be - unless - mm - wonder if is possible that they might be what we call tea cakes?)

Shirley, I think it's yet another thing that Americans have named that have nothing to do with the country referenced. Here are a couple of pictures. They are a basic bread made on a griddle that tend to have a slightly chewy texture. They are not usually very sweet. And they are nothing like the other things we Americans call "muffins".

http://www.imaginatorium.org/pics/b02406muff.jpg
http://www.prevention.com/images/cma/english_muffin1.jpg

Shirley Ekstein
05-17-2004, 04:35 PM
Ok, Arete and Rebecca, and thanks, both of you, for the pictures and to Rebecca for the bumf (d'you know 'bumf'? - is an English word for information) - is interesting - and they are definitely NOT tea cakes, which are a sort of flat leavened bun with currants.

What they appear to be, oddly enough, is muffins.

T'was the 'English' bit that threw me - thought you might have something different.

Sorry. . .

rinsav
05-17-2004, 05:05 PM
I'll have to try the Trader Joe ones. I usually just buy Thomas's English Muffins - I rotate through Oatbran, Honey Whole wheat, and Multigrain. I think they're all really good.

Mlasley
05-17-2004, 05:46 PM
Matthew's bakery makes a whole wheat english muffin. I get them at a local health food store.

funnybone
05-17-2004, 05:49 PM
I like the ones form TJ's because they have 5 grams of fiber in them (if memory serves me right) compared to most other brands that only have 1 gr.

Jollyjo
05-17-2004, 07:40 PM
Thank you everyone! Just so happens I am headed to both Trader Joe's and Whole Foods tomorrow for the very first time. I recently found out they are about an hour away from where I live. Have to do some business in that area, so I will make a pitstop. Can't wait:D

basilbabe
05-17-2004, 07:44 PM
Wow! Those pictures look delicious!!!!!