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View Full Version : Is Fontina cheese a type of swiss?



at828
12-07-2005, 12:43 PM
Is Fontina cheese a type of swiss? If not, can anyone describe the flavor/what a similar cheese would be?
TIA!

blazedog
12-07-2005, 12:47 PM
It's similar as both are mild yellowy cheeses that aren't hard or soft and melt well and combine with other flavors fairly well.

Fontina has a slightly sharper flavor although I would hardly characterize it as sharp. Any of the meltable cheese in that family could be interchanged and the result might be subtly different - gruyere, emmanthaler -- if you are dealing with supermarket cheeses - even muenster or edam which have almost no taste.

sneezles
12-07-2005, 12:49 PM
I don't know that I'd classify it as a swiss but I've used it to sub for Emmentaler, Gruyére and Swiss. It's a very mild cheese that melts very well.

at828
12-07-2005, 01:01 PM
Thanks for the replies.
I don't like swiss cheese (the flavor; not the texutre). Might I like fontina?

blazedog
12-07-2005, 01:05 PM
Swiss cheese has such an innocuous flavor that it's hard to think you would like fontina and not Swiss. Do you like gruyere for example? This is especially true if you are cooking with the cheese since the differences in flavors would be more subtle when melted and blended with other flavors.

Fontina, if anything, has more of a pronounced "cheesy" flavor (although I would still denominate as mild) than swiss.

Grace
12-07-2005, 01:11 PM
I personally don't think it tastes anything like Swiss at all. I love Swiss cheese, but fontina is more "mozzeralla-ish" IMO since it's kind of bland, particularly compared to Swiss (but not as bland as mozzeralla, of course). I like it very much as does DH, who does not like Swiss.

SandyM
12-07-2005, 01:31 PM
I don't think fontina tastes anything like Swiss. It's very mild, and as Susan says, it melts very well. It's great on pizza, as a sub for (or in addition to) mozzarella.

Try it. I'm willing to bet you'll like it. :)

tbb113
12-07-2005, 01:33 PM
From foodsubs

fontina Pronunciation: fon-TEE-nuh Notes: This well-regarded cheese is mild but interesting, and it's a good melter. Substitutes: Gruyère OR Emmental OR Beaufort OR Edam OR Gouda OR Bel Paese OR Appenzell OR provolone OR rablochon

mbrogier
12-07-2005, 01:56 PM
I don't like "Swiss" cheese, but I love gruyere. The Swiss I don't like is that supermarket stuff that is so sharp and tastes like mold--I'm not really sure why they call that stuff cheese, anyway. I like the blocks of gruyere that are nutty and mellow. I think Emmentaler is a bit sharper usually. You might like Gouda. That was the first cheese I ate.

If you went to Whole Foods, they'll let you sample the cheeses so you'll know what you like and don't like. Eat small bites, not huge chunks.

at828
12-07-2005, 01:56 PM
Thank you!!!

Robyn1007
12-07-2005, 04:10 PM
I don't like "Swiss" cheese, but I love gruyere. The Swiss I don't like is that supermarket stuff that is so sharp and tastes like mold--I'm not really sure why they call that stuff cheese, anyway. I like the blocks of gruyere that are nutty and mellow. I think Emmentaler is a bit sharper usually. You might like Gouda. That was the first cheese I ate.

If you went to Whole Foods, they'll let you sample the cheeses so you'll know what you like and don't like. Eat small bites, not huge chunks.

Finally, someone with the same opinion of swiss cheese as me! I do like Fontina though and think it's nothing like swiss.

Aubergine
12-07-2005, 04:15 PM
be aware, also, that there are two distinct types of fontina. one is danish, and it's similar to gouda and edam, hard and dry. the italian fontina, otoh, is a completely different animal, softer and creamier, with a divine flavor. i knew the danish type for years, and was blown away by the italian kind when i first found it at WF a couple of years ago. i dunno why they have the same name, b/c they are completely different.

bobmark226
12-07-2005, 04:20 PM
Yeah, and there's a lot of Irish Fontina around now too.

Here's what you do. Go to your supermarket cheese counter, ask the person there to give you a taste. They pretty much all do it.

Bob

generic
12-07-2005, 06:41 PM
be aware, also, that there are two distinct types of fontina. one is danish, and it's similar to gouda and edam, hard and dry. the italian fontina, otoh, is a completely different animal, softer and creamier, with a divine flavor. i knew the danish type for years, and was blown away by the italian kind when i first found it at WF a couple of years ago. i dunno why they have the same name, b/c they are completely different.
I didn't know this. Very interesting. My girlfriend wanted fontina cheese for her engagement party a few years ago, so a couple of us brought chunks of it for her. She griped and complained about how yucky it was and that it wasn't what she wanted. Her mother is Italian, so she was probably expecting something different than what we found at the grocery.