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Cookin4Love
01-10-2006, 12:35 PM
I went and saw my new office yesterday. I didn't even think about needing to decorate! The room could REALLY benefit from some plants, but there is absolutely no natural sunlight--no windows anywhere.

Are there any plants that will grow under those conditions? And because of our district's energy conservation, leaving on a grow light would not be an option. Any ideas?

donleyk
01-10-2006, 12:39 PM
Real Simple just had an article about low light plants. I'll see if I can dig it up. Ha! No pun intended :p

jking323
01-10-2006, 12:43 PM
Look for a Pothos plant (sometimes called Devil's Ivy). I work in an office of engineers, the majority of which have no window access. There must be at least a dozen of these plants in our office, all spawned from the original one purchased some ten years ago. They flourish in simple flourescent light, do well with under- or over-watering, and grow like crazy. A couple of my coworkers are racing theirs up the walls and across the drop-tile ceilings (apparently my boss hasn't noticed). Not very fancy (basically green foliage), but it certainly softens the cube farm a bit.

More info.
http://www.aboutflowers.com/gandb/pothos.html

donleyk
01-10-2006, 12:49 PM
Rats. There was a link to the NY botanical website but they want you to be registered.

I know pothos (I hope that's the spelling) does well in low light. And snake plants can take low light. I know they listed one more...

I have a lily that does fine with just the office light. And my fern is actually happy in here too. Now, I have a window but I live in Ohio. It's not like it gets a lot of light most winter days. :(

bliss
01-10-2006, 01:00 PM
Following Donleyk's comment mention of lilies, I have a peace lily (I don't know if the names the same in the US but google it and I'm sure it will say) in a shady room and its done fine, its lasted for years now, and seems quite hardy as I used to take it to college with me too. Its mainly green but gets the white flower thingies every couple of years.

Lillith
01-10-2006, 01:25 PM
Although many plants do well in low light (peacy lily, Chinese evergreen, the Warneckii and Janet Craig variety of the dracaena plants), all plants need SOME light. Even the spathiphyllum, also known as the closet plant, needs a little light. A mostly shady room is different than a room with no windows at all, as you described your room to be. What about artificial plants? You'd be amazed at how real looking some are these days....a far cry from the obvious, thick and waxy looking plants of the past.

Wendy w
01-10-2006, 01:34 PM
Real Simple just had an article about low light plants. I'll see if I can dig it up. Ha! No pun intended :p

:D :p

How about silk?? Ordinarily, I would be embarassed to suggest it, but there are some realistic looking ones out there.

Cookin4Love
01-10-2006, 02:09 PM
I'm not opposed to artificial plants; I was just hoping to be able to find some real plants that would help cleanse the air instead of collecting dust. ;)

CompassRose
01-10-2006, 03:26 PM
Although many plants do well in low light (peacy lily, Chinese evergreen, the Warneckii and Janet Craig variety of the dracaena plants), all plants need SOME light. Even the spathiphyllum, also known as the closet plant, needs a little light. A mostly shady room is different than a room with no windows at all, as you described your room to be. What about artificial plants? You'd be amazed at how real looking some are these days....a far cry from the obvious, thick and waxy looking plants of the past.
But as donley & jking pointed out, there are a few plants that do fine under fluorescent light. Actually, quite a few! We've got pothos, too (again, in offices that get no natural light at all) and one of my coworkers grows African violets on her desk, right in the heart of the cube farm. Spider plants do okay for a while, but usually need breaks (at my old office, they'd be rotated, and the nursery guys would bring us new spiders every six months or so when the old ones began to look pallid, and take the old ones back to the greenhouse). But it's not like it's hard to cultivate a spider plant.

tamawrite
01-10-2006, 07:52 PM
Many plants will do surprisingly well under florescent lights. Many have already been mentioned, but I wanted to add that some tropical plants do well in low light. Read the tags, because most tropicals go for medium light (natural but not direct sunlight.) I just took a peace lily & some tropicals to my florescent-lit office, so here's hoping. :)

olchik
01-11-2006, 05:22 AM
You can also go to the plant store and the shop assistants will advice you something, they know for sure!

NancyR
01-11-2006, 08:42 AM
Whatever you decide on you might want to buy 2 of the same thing and rotate them. Keep one in your office and one in a location with some light and then switch them on a regular schedulte (daily/weekly/whatever).