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View Full Version : Does your office dress casually or "formally"?



foodfiend
07-24-2006, 07:02 AM
People dress casually at the place I'm at now, but then again it's summertime. Wondered if the standards of dress have changed at other offices.

dixie
07-24-2006, 07:07 AM
"business casual" men generally wear dress pants and a golf shirt or button down shirt, no tie. Women wear summer pants, skirts, nice capris, etc...no stockings but nice shoes. Its typically freezing in the office so tho we may wear a sleeveless top most women will have jacket or sweater on too. Its pretty much the same in the winter...just heavier clothes!

ChristineVA
07-24-2006, 07:09 AM
We are supposed to be "formal" Monday-Thursday and then business casual on Friday.

Of course, with the styles of women's clothing these days, it is very hard to look "office appropriate."

Laura
07-24-2006, 07:17 AM
The firm I have started working with is formal. However, as I am an attorney, and may have to go to court, I guess I can understand it. I wear pants most days, so I don't have to wear pantyhose though.

Hammster
07-24-2006, 07:27 AM
People dress casually at the place I'm at now, but then again it's summertime. Wondered if the standards of dress have changed at other offices.

As mentioned in previous posts about standards of dress, I think we generally dress down more now than ever before. Some offices, such as attorneys, and those who deal with the public tend to dress better than those offices and businesses who don't have to deal with the public. I'm in a manufacturing environment and unless we have customers coming to visit, everyone from CEO on down dress pretty casually. I've seen the CEO in slacks and a button down shirt with his sleeves rolled up past the elbows. My normal attire is blue jeans and a polo shirt. Although if I know I'm going to be more hands on and physical during the day I'll put on a t-shirt or some other shirt that I don't mind damaging (potentially).
So we are quite casual here. Sandals for men and women are seen all over. On the manufacturing floor, the dress is casual for sure, but steel toed shoes must be worn as what we make is quite heavy.

Canice
07-24-2006, 08:45 AM
Most definitely casual. Lots of blue jeans and flip-flops, and in this heat, lots of flesh! I'm actually surprised at some of what I see. Not the level of formality (I tend to wear khakis and t-shirts) but how provocatively some women dress. I haven't seen business attire at work (I'm in advertising FWIW) since around 1990, and even business casual seemed to disappear a few years later. Even a lot of law firms (most?) are business casual. Silicon Valley is a huge influence on dress on around here.

hlao23
07-24-2006, 08:48 AM
I'm in a university and the styles vary widely within our department. Our office does research. Since we're not dealing directly with people outside our office most of us are pretty casual. Not jeans - except on Fridays - but we do wear summer dresses, capris and flip flops. Most of us go work out at some point during the day and it's not unusual to catch us running around in our sweatpants for a little while afterwards if we just don't feel like changing.

No one is terribly formal except perhaps our department chair. We also have people who run around in scrubs. I think I may try to push for that look come winter...I HATE winter clothes. Scrubs seem comfy and no one knows that we don't have to wear them. :D

SheRa
07-24-2006, 09:44 AM
business casual with "dressdown" on fridays, but summertime we can dress down whenever. no holes in jeans, no smartass sayings on t-shirts, etc.

aggie94
07-24-2006, 09:50 AM
"business casual" men generally wear dress pants and a golf shirt or button down shirt, no tie. Women wear summer pants, skirts, nice capris, etc...no stockings but nice shoes.

This is our office for the most part. We are officially business casual, but we have a more relaxed dress code here in Phoenix than our other offices. When it's 118 in Kansas City, then they might get to wear open-toed shoes and capris to work too. ;) We do dress up when we have client meetings or hearings to go to. Fridays are more casual, but still no jeans unless there is a charity day scheduled.

sparrowgrass
07-24-2006, 10:22 AM
I work for the University of Missouri Extension office, and we laugh at this a lot. We always get a note when we register for conferences that mentions a dress code: business casual.

For our small business and community development folks, that means a suit, and you can loosen the tie, if you really need to. For the home ec women, it is dresses and nice pant suits and heels. For the aggies and the 4-H'ers, it is khakis or jeans and Extension logo polos, and cowboy boots, work boots, or sandals. (And we try to kick the manure off before we go indoors.)

In the office, we are very casual. It is a very rural area, and I can go months without seeing a suit. I am in the courthouse, and a suit usually means an attorney. (Defendants need a dress code--I suggest this: Please cover all tattoos and belly buttons. A belly button ring is not sufficient coverage for court day.)

I wear jeans or capris, sandals, U. shirts or knit tops.

Meganator
07-24-2006, 11:49 AM
We never deal with the public/customers in person, so our office is very casual. The range is from what I would consider to be business casual (Dockers/polos for men, for example) to flip-flops, shorts, capris, jeans, T-shirts etc. People wear whatever they want, and no one has gone over the line to something inapppropriate.

Varaile
07-24-2006, 12:08 PM
I work in a "field office" in where the Foresters (myself included) go out into the woods everyday. So it's often grubby jeans, t-shirts, long sleeve shirts, woolies, parkas in the winter time. "Nice" woodsy glothes aren't worth the expence as they get trashed so quickly. For office days, it's jeans and t-shirts/polo shirts depending on how newly-wed they are. ;) :D

However, it would be nice if the guys could at least wear clothes on office days that weren't paint stained, faded, ripped or frayed. We do interact with the public on occasion and I feel we should at least be presentable when we are in. :rolleyes: IMO. :)

Tho, I sometimes wish I had a job where I could buy the really nice business suits and the nice dresses and such (with the shoes to go with!). Even a woodsy girl gets tired of jeans and t-shirts all the time... :o

Beth H
07-24-2006, 12:12 PM
Our office is business casual (I work at a University). Pantyhose and suits are not necessary, but nice skirts, trousers, and nicer capris are - no flip-flops or jeans (actually my boss also frowns on jean skirts). I don't mind it - the only thing I would really hate is to have to wear pantyhose everyday.

ErinM
07-24-2006, 12:20 PM
I work in a hospital. The nurse all wear scrubs or trackpants/t-shirts/sweatshirts, even though technically they're not supposed to. Doctors wear scrubs or shirts and ties/white coat if they're male and if they're female, anything goes as long as it looks "professional". For my position, I'm supposed to dress professional to business casual. I don't have to wear a suit, but I do have to look nice and I have to wear soft soled shoes since I'm going in and out of patients' rooms alot. I could probably get away with scrubs too, and someday soon, on the weekend, I may try that. I just don't like being "dressed nice" at 9:00 at night!

greysangel
07-24-2006, 12:21 PM
flip flops would so NOT fly here...and THANK GOODNESS! :D Even sandals aren't really worn around this office even though it's business casual. No denim, no t shirts, no exposed midriff :D Even capris are an "only friday" kind of thing.

sparrowgrass
07-24-2006, 12:38 PM
Varaile--USFS? We might know some of the same people.

foodfiend
07-24-2006, 01:43 PM
Just a question: if you dressed more formally than your colleagues (nothing too fancy -- skirt and blouse when others are wearing capris), do you think that would affect how people treat you?

greysangel
07-24-2006, 01:47 PM
Just a question: if you dressed more formally than your colleagues (nothing too fancy -- skirt and blouse when others are wearing capris), do you think that would affect how people treat you?

IMO it's always better to be overdressed than underdressed.

Laura
07-24-2006, 02:03 PM
Just a question: if you dressed more formally than your colleagues (nothing too fancy -- skirt and blouse when others are wearing capris), do you think that would affect how people treat you?

There was an article in our newspaper about this, and the answer is you are treated more professionally, if you dress more professionally. It seems like a no-brainer, but I have been surprised at what some people think is acceptable attire for work.

SDMomChef
07-24-2006, 02:55 PM
Of course, with the styles of women's clothing these days, it is very hard to look "office appropriate."

I TOTALLY agree! This is one of my biggest pet peeves...for men to be "business casual", they just have to put on a pair of dockers and a nice shirt. I can't get away with wearing sleveless shirts as being "business casual" in my office. Actually, I think I am a candidate for "What Not to Wear" when it comes to business casual because I don't know how to dress trendy and still be wearing office appropriate clothes! Anybody else have this issue?

foodfiend
07-24-2006, 03:06 PM
Actually, I think I am a candidate for "What Not to Wear" when it comes to business casual because I don't know how to dress trendy and still be wearing office appropriate clothes! Anybody else have this issue?
My idea of office wear are classics you could wear every year. You can be trendy with the accessories.

mbrogier
07-24-2006, 03:50 PM
Just a question: if you dressed more formally than your colleagues (nothing too fancy -- skirt and blouse when others are wearing capris), do you think that would affect how people treat you?

I think it does affect how people treat you--especially your superiors. I insist that my DH wears nice jeans and polos even though his office is casual right now. I also insist that he gets his hair cut at a decent salon so he looks more professional. He's gotten promoted over people twice his age every year, so it is probably helping. Other guys just don't care about how they look... but then again they don't get asked to represent the company in trade magazines, either.

DH's new office is not casual. He'll be wearing khakis but no tie.

Canice
07-24-2006, 04:29 PM
Just a question: if you dressed more formally than your colleagues (nothing too fancy -- skirt and blouse when others are wearing capris), do you think that would affect how people treat you?

When I was a secretary and wanting to get promoted I always dressed more professionally than the other secretaries (a friend had suggested I dress for the job I wanted, not the job I had) and I always walked with a sense of purpose. When the time came to interview for a promotion several people I interviewed with were startled and said they'd assumed I was in a higher position than I was. I don't know why else they would have thought that if not the clothes and purposeful stride.

Wendy w
07-24-2006, 05:08 PM
I work at a university too and some areas are more formal than others, but most of us are business casual, especially in summer. I am in personnel and part of the Dean's office so I favor skirts and cropped pants in the summer and dressed up jeans in the cooler months. I am guilty of sometimes wearing flip flops, but haven't been called on the carpet for it. I have stopped wearing shorts on Fridays as I find it inappropriate for someone my age.

Most of the faculty are very, very casual and often don shorts white sandals and socks. :rolleyes: Our support people are really casual too. The exception is our "external relations" department, who schmooze donors for money, they really dress up.

I'm proud to say that I'm going into year 7 without panty hose. ;)