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Linda in MO
11-22-2006, 12:11 PM
I've about had it with homemade pie crusts!! I was trying to par-bake my crust for my pumpkin pie and the sides of the crust started to melt and collapse! :eek: :mad: The same thing happened to me last year! I was barely able to salvage it, but I can't figure out what is going on. I used the perfect pie crust from Barefoot Contessa, which is different from the one last year. I chilled the dough overnight, chilled it again before baking, set my rack to the 2nd from bottom shelf, lined the crust w/parchment and put dried beans in it, and upped the temp. from last year (375) to 425 (because I read this on the internet "Place the crust in a hot oven say, 425F, which will help set the flour in the sides before the fat starts to soften").

The only thing I can figure out is that I'm not putting enough beans in to support the sides of the crust, since I also read this "make sure to gently push the beans or rice up against the sides of the parchment or coffee filter, to keep the sides of the crust from collapsing in the heat of the oven". Help! It shouldn't be this hard! I've been making pie crust since I was in high school home-ec and just started having problems the last couple of years! :rolleyes: What's the deal?

BTW, this is where I got the above quotes from Rose Levy Beranbaum...
http://www.ochef.com/955.htm

lindrusso
11-22-2006, 01:28 PM
Don't give up! :)

This may not help you this year, but if you have time this year or just want to save it for next time......

These tips may all be ones you've read before, but here's what has worked for me.

First - I don't pre-bake my crust and get great results with pumpkin pie. To get a nice, crisp crust, butter the bottom of the pie dish - this will help browning. After forming the pie crust in the dish, I brush it with a beaten egg white - this will help seal the crust and prevent it from getting mushy.

Sounds like you chilled it plenty, so that's not the problem! It's odd that you've had success in the past but are having problems now!

Are you using an all-butter crust? I have found that they tend to melt or lose shape more easily. I like the taste of the all-butter crust best, but I found that a half butter/half shortening crust gave me a little better form, but still plenty of butter flavor.

Best of luck! Pie crusts can be a pain, but even a mangled homemade crust tends to taste better than store-bought. :)

sneezles
11-22-2006, 03:28 PM
Linda,
So sorry you're having trouble with crusts...they can be such a demon! Like Alysha, I coat with egg white but do bake for 5 minutes before filling but agree totally on all butter crusts. Are you docking the crust?

Middydd
11-22-2006, 05:57 PM
I was having the same problem with my crusts so asked the board for help.

http://community.cookinglight.com/showthread.php?t=96172&highlight=blind+baking

It looks like you're already using all the tips given. The one posted by Hammster to press your crust onto the flanged edge might help.

ADM
11-22-2006, 06:11 PM
I've been making pie crust since I was in high school home-ec and just started having problems the last couple of years! :rolleyes: What's the deal?

Did you change the type of shortening (butter, or whatever) you use to make your crusts?

Gracie
11-22-2006, 07:45 PM
I had the same issue with my apple pie - my fluted edge just slid off the pie plate. However I know what I did wrong - I didn't trim my edges. I was thinking that I'd finally had enough overhang to really seal the top crust and the bottom crust and prevent leakage. But it was too heavy and it just slid right off.

Linda I'm sorry you're going through this but I'm sure it will still taste wonderful!

Loren

Linda in MO
11-28-2006, 08:19 AM
Thanks everybody!! I was able to salvage the crust but just barely. :rolleyes: To answer some of the questions:
The crust I used calls for both butter and shortening. I didn't dock my crust. I'm not really loyal to a certain butter or shortening...so over the years I've use everything from plain crisco, butter crisco, tran-fat free criso, LOL butter, Hiland butter, Great Value butter (from walmart), etc.
I bought more dried beans for next time so I can fill the crust up more. Also, I will chill the formed crust even longer.

The crust recipe made 2 crusts, so w/the other crust I made a Caramel Pecan Pie. That recipe doesn't call for par-baking the crust. I formed the crust in the pan and chilled it overnight. I preheated my oven for about 30 minutes or so with the rack on the bottom and a stone on top of it. This is supposed to brown the bottom of your crust. Also, I used Hammster's tip of pressing the edges to the top of the pan. Well, the pie was good and my crust didn't melt, but I thought it was a bit doughy on the bottom. Also, my pretty crimped edges kind of spread and didn't keep their shape. And my filling wasn't the same as the last time I made it. This time it almost looked like a pumpkin filling and the first time I made it, the filling was like creamy/melty caramels. Oh well, it still tasted good.
Here's a link to the Caramel Pecan Pie recipe and a picture of the first one I made...
http://community.cookinglight.com/showthread.php?t=82144&highlight=caramel+pecan

I think I just need to make pies for every occassion, so I can master it!

Anne
11-29-2006, 09:41 AM
If you pie pan isn't too thick you can bake the crust on the outside, with pan upside down. This works with thin aluminum pans but not with my thick glass ones.

Anne
11-29-2006, 09:42 AM
If your pie pan is thin you can back the crust on the outside with the pan upside down. This works with my thin aluminum pan but not my thick glass ones.

kbucky
11-29-2006, 12:22 PM
I struggled with pie crusts for a long time, and we are finally getting along a little better. I use the America's Test Kitchen Family Cookbook pie crust with butter and shortening. I just made a pecan praline pie at Thanksgiving which required blind baking.

Their tips were to let the crust sit in the freezer for 30 minutes (until hard) before baking, and then to cover 2 squares of foil placed cross-wise overhanging the edges, then top with weights (I use ceramic pie weights and also added in a bunch of pennies to get the volume I needed). The foil and weights work great on a frozen crust, because you don't have to take as much care not to mash your pretty edges when you're arranging the foil. I think the foil must also help with browning. That being said, I always end up using one of those aluminum pie edge covers sometime before the pie is done (after the foil has been removed), so that the edges don't overbrown while the filling is cooking. This crust didn't get soggy, even after 2 days in the frig; I didn't even seal it with egg wash either. America's Test Kitchen/CI swear by the pyrex pie plates, too.

So freezing the crust in the plate and using lots of pie weights works great for me.

mbrogier
11-29-2006, 12:42 PM
I have problems with melted pie crusts, too.

I did what KBucky suggested and let the crust get very chilled in my deep freeze. That worked very well! I baked the crust at 400 degrees.

saserre
11-29-2006, 01:35 PM
Please forgive my lack of piecrust experience and my reliance on that Will Not Be Named White Yeasty Creature with a Chef Hat, but why do you bake the pie crust in advance?

My brother makes tons of pies (he's the baker in the family, I'm the cooking not baking), apple, pumpkin, mince meat, rhubarb, etc. and he doesn't precook them, and they always come out fabulous.

Linda in MO
11-29-2006, 08:51 PM
Thanks for all the additional comments, guys. I will refer back to this thread the next time I make a pie.


Please forgive my lack of piecrust experience and my reliance on that Will Not Be Named White Yeasty Creature with a Chef Hat, but why do you bake the pie crust in advance?

My brother makes tons of pies (he's the baker in the family, I'm the cooking not baking), apple, pumpkin, mince meat, rhubarb, etc. and he doesn't precook them, and they always come out fabulous.

Some recipes call for you to bake the crust for a short amount of time before you add the filling because the crust needs a longer bake time than the filling that you're adding. It probably also helps "set" your crust so it doesn't get soggy. I just do whatever the recipe calls for me to do. Plus, not to mention, some pies have a filling that you don't want to bake. So you have to have a fully baked crust to start out with.