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Thread: Ever get a "bad egg"?

  1. #1
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    Ever get a "bad egg"?

    Somewhere on the path to learning to cook, I picked up the notion that one should break eggs into a small, separate bowl rather than add directly to a batter, meatloaf, etc. As I recall, the idea was that it would be easier to fish out shell chips there than from a big mixing bowl. Or they'd be more visible. Don't recall.
    But every single time I watch Barefoot Contessa she says to break eggs into a small, separate bowl because "You never know when you're going to get a bad egg" -- and then gives a big frown. Really? A bad egg? Either I don't cook with eggs a lot (OK, I don't), I've been incredibly fortunate (no stones in lentils either!), I'm utterly oblivious to a bad egg when I encounter one, or it's hooey.

    Do you get bad eggs?
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  2. #2
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    I've never gotten a bad egg (and I use them WAYYYYYY past the date on the carton...) I wonder if she's cooking with Fresh i.e. Farmer's Market type eggs? Maybe then you'd be more likely to get a bad one.

  3. #3
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    Canice,

    I have been meaning to post this exact thread topic for about 6 months and just haven't gotten around to it yet and now you beat me!! I wonder about the "bad egg" thing every time Ina or Paula Deen mention that which is almost every episode. I have never gotten a bad egg or if I had, didn't know it.

    I will be interesting to see how many people on the BB have.....

    P.S. If an egg is bad and it is hard boiled first, would you know it once you removed the shell?

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    I'm new to the board, but just had to chime in on this.

    and uhhh, YES. I have! Trust me, you better pray you NEVER get one.

    I was in the middle of making a batch of cupcakes from scratch(not a mix, so it was more annoying because I took the time to measure and soften butter, etc.) and I crack one egg, fine....second egg and this HORRIBLE smell rises up. As soon as I cracked the egg, I knew somethign was wrong with it by the way it crack and the yolk, yeah, it was just all wrong.

    The smell. I couldn't gut it, I had to get my husband to come in and clean the bowl out for me.

    I learned to use a small bowl....

    So here, is one bad egg. LOL.

  5. #5
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    I remember that once there was a bad smell in the refrigerator which I eventually traced to a cracked egg. The crack was quite visible though. Other than that, no, I've never had a bad egg. I do break each egg into a small bowl if I'm going to separate them, in case I break the yolk, but I don't do it if they're not to be separated.

  6. #6
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    Welcome to the BB, Car!
    Sorry you had the "bad egg" experience. So far, you're the first person in my life I've heard of who's had it! I guess it's entirely possible, but so far the odds seem to be about 1 billion to 1.

    You gotta be kidding me, misskitty -- Paula Deen frets about a bad egg?? I would think that that "stick o' butter" and other krapp at every meal would be a MUCH bigger concern. Huh.

    Don't know about the fresh vs. factory, Peweh, but those TV programs are very main-stream oriented, so I'd be surprised. However, right after posting this I *did* break 3 eggs for a custard...and one had two yolks. I had never seen that before, but they were free-range, fertilized, so perhaps that factored in? I only bought them because they were the cheapest.
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  7. #7
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    Although I don't break my eggs into a separate bowl, but probably should..I've already had eggs with "blood spots" in them...although not large, they when down the sink

    ~Gail
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    If, therefore, there be any kindness I can show or any good thing I can do any fellow being, let me do it now and not defer or neglect it, as I shall not pass this way again."
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by gabbyh View Post
    Although I don't break my eggs into a separate bowl, but probably should..I've already had eggs with "blood spots" in them...although not large, they when down the sink

    ~Gail
    Any reason you do this? IIRC, the blood doesn't pose any health risk, and can simply be removed for aesthetic reasons. The blood spots are usually caused when a hen has experienced stress during the laying process, such as if a dog gets into the henhouse or if the hen just had a quarrel with her girlfriend across the way. Contrary to popular opinion, these spots do not indicate a fertilized eggs, as laying hens aren't exposed to males.
    "Is ice hockey hard? I don't know, you tell me. We need to have the strength and power of a football player, the stamina of a marathon runner and the concentration of a brain surgeon. But, we need to put all this together while moving at high speeds on a cold and slippery surface while 5 other guys use clubs to try and kill us. Oh, yeah, did I mention that this whole time we're standing on blades 1/8 of an inch thick. Is ice hockey hard? I don't know, you tell me. Next question."

  9. #9
    Due to limited refrigerator space on Submarines, whole fresh eggs are stored at room temperature. (Well, submarines are slightly air conditioned, so it's generally 70ish in there) Anyway, the eggs last about a month at room temp. Then, when they go bad they go REALLY bad. We are talking rank and black!! Yup, black (inside, you wouldn't have a clue looking at the shell). I've never had a bad one at home, but saw my share on the submarine. The cooks always used bowls to crack the eggs into. Peeeeyouuuuuu!!!

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    I've had two eggs with blood spots. Sure, they may still be OK to eat- but the thought gave me enough of the heebie jeebies to get rid of the cake I was mixing.

    Since, I've always broken into a smaller bowl.
    Life finds a way to amaze and amuse me everyday.

  11. #11
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    Just to add my 2 cents, the practice of cracking an egg into a seperate bowl started a longgggg time ago when they didn't have refrigeration and yes, eggs would go bad. It is a rare occurance now, but old habits are hard to break. And it does make it easier to fish out the shell pieces.

  12. #12
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    Well, not very long ago I actually did get a bad egg. I was baking something and cracked open a bloody egg. I've never purchased that brand of eggs again, although I'm sure it could happen to anyone. I guess one in 20 years of cooking and baking isn't so bad!

  13. #13
    I have never had a bad egg here in the US, but I always crack in a small bowl first. When I lived in Kenya, a bad egg happened quite often. That would lead me to agree with other posts that it is an old habit from when eggs were not refridgerated. In Kenya, they are not refridgerated in stores, however, I put them in the fridge as soon as I got home. I also wonder if it has something to do with factory versus fresh eggs as another post mentioned as all the eggs in Kenya are fresh.
    Either way, I will never get out of the habit of cracking into a bowl. I do not want my first bad egg to be the 4th egg I crack into a cake or something else. That is how I learned my lesson before!

  14. #14
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    Because I have encountered bad eggs on several ocassions, I always crack eggs in a small, seperate bowl. If I need to crack more than one, I use 2 bowls so that I can crack each egg separately before adding to the others.

    I've never encountered a truly rotten, smelly egg, but I've had eggs that you could tell weren't right because of the color of the yolk, the cloudiness and consistency of the white and an off smell.

    As a boater, learning how to keep eggs unrefrigerated for a long period of time is important. The key is to buy fresh eggs that have never been refrigerated, like from a local farm, do not wash them because you wash away the protective coating they have naturally, and then turn them in their carton twice a week (just turn the carton over). Supposedly they will keep that way for months. If you have previously refrigerated eggs, there are other tricks to keeping them unrefrigerated, such as dipping them in wax or coating them with vaseline. I realize you guys don't need to know this, but thought you might find it interesting!

  15. #15
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    I have gotten a bad egg once or twice as well. I started cracking into a bowl or measuring cup, but I've been lazy the last few years and have been lucky. I usually crack them into a measuring cup these days if DD is helping b/c she likes to put the eggs in.
    “When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed
    door that we do not see the one which has been opened for us.”

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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1965 View Post
    Well, not very long ago I actually did get a bad egg. I was baking something and cracked open a bloody egg. I've never purchased that brand of eggs again, although I'm sure it could happen to anyone. I guess one in 20 years of cooking and baking isn't so bad!

    we all know how much I bake and I never have had a bad egg. I used to crack them into a bowl first because that is how my mom taught me to bake (back in Saudi Arabia where I guess it was more important to do that). but now I don't bother because it is a waste of time and a waste of a bowl.

    anyway, wanted to second what bethany said about the blood spots in the eggs. I have seen too many of those to even count. I know that they are harmless. I don't even try to fish out the blood spot. so definitely I wouldn't say an egg that has one is bad. also, I use eggs with cloudy whites. if the egg smells fine, I use it.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by valchemist View Post
    also, I use eggs with cloudy whites. if the egg smells fine, I use it.

    It's my understanding that a cloudy white is a sign of a fresh egg. In fact, in the freshest eggs the whites are so opaque you can't see the yolk.

    My mother always made us break into small bowls because eggs weren't refrigerated in Germany and she had her share of bad eggs, she also didn't care for the blood spot. These days I don't normally use a small bowl unless the recipe has a lot of eggs.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canice View Post
    However, right after posting this I *did* break 3 eggs for a custard...and one had two yolks. I had never seen that before, but they were free-range, fertilized, so perhaps that factored in?
    I once had a dozen just regular supermarket eggs, and 4 of them were double-yolked!

    Quote Originally Posted by Hammster View Post
    Due to limited refrigerator space on Submarines, whole fresh eggs are stored at room temperature.
    We used to do this at our cottage in Ontario! We would put eggs into the fridge if we had space, but usually kept the 4 dozen or so for the week just in a cupboard. Never had a bad one! But, once you've had a rotten egg, you'll be very careful!

    DH tried to freeze eggs when he first lived on his own... Instant bleck!
    Kay
    I'm a WYSIWYG person -- no subterfuge here!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by sneezles View Post
    It's my understanding that a cloudy white is a sign of a fresh egg. In fact, in the freshest eggs the whites are so opaque you can't see the yolk.

    My mother always made us break into small bowls because eggs weren't refrigerated in Germany and she had her share of bad eggs, she also didn't care for the blood spot. These days I don't normally use a small bowl unless the recipe has a lot of eggs.
    That's really interesting! I'll have to ask my MIL about that since she was raised on a farm. As a side note, she hates the taste of chicken today. She says it tastes nothing like the chickens they had on the farm as a kid. She said those chickens never had any fat on them and were much tastier.

  20. #20
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    just after posting that I went to make a cake. we have only eggland's best eggs around so I had to use those for the cake. one had a blood spot and one was cloudy (therefor fresh I guess!).

  21. #21
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    I've never had a bad egg and never even noticed any blood spots. I guess after hearing about the blood spots I would maybe bake with those -- possibly -- but I don't think I could proceed with scrambled eggs or anything like that.
    Once, during prohibition, I was forced to live for days on nothing but food and water. W. C. Fields

  22. #22
    I never use a bowl, and we go through a good bit of eggs (at least a dozen or more a week, depending on how much baking I do). I've never had a bad egg, and I guess it's just as easy for me to fish out a bit of shell from the rest of the ingredients as it is from the "egg bowl".

    I do get small blood spots quite frequently (I'd say about 40% of the eggs have one), and it seems like they are far more common in the cage-free eggs, and in Eggland's Best. I very rarely see them in supermarket eggs, which I would assume come from very stressed-out chickens. I wonder if they somehow screen them out? I use the eggs anyway, and don't bother trying to get the blood spot out.

  23. #23
    I do it into a small glass bowl not for fear of bad eggs, but because it's easier to get any shell shards out.

    Susan
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by valchemist View Post
    just after posting that I went to make a cake. we have only eggland's best eggs around so I had to use those for the cake. one had a blood spot and one was cloudy (therefor fresh I guess!).
    Absolutely, the blood spot only shows on fresh eggs:

    As an egg ages, the yolk takes up water from the albumen to dilute the blood spot so, in actuality, a blood spot indicates that the egg is fresh
    Egg Facts!
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by JulieM View Post
    ... If I need to crack more than one, I use 2 bowls so that I can crack each egg separately before adding to the others....
    Well at least that makes sense. The other weird thing is that she cracks them all into the same bowl! So she's making one of her 8-egg custards and each egg goes into the same bowl. So what happens if the bad one is egg #8?

    Great link, sneezles.
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  26. #26
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    Only once, so far.
    I just posted this on another thread...
    I was doing the break-an-egg-in-separate-bowl when this occurred, thankfully.

    It was from a farmer as well and these are beautiful eggs.
    I know Europeans rarely refrigerate their eggs but because we had a power outage that lasted 2 days, I was just nervous about some things in my fridge, so I used that method. THankfully, I got one bad one.
    Haven't had any since....
    knock on wood.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by leightx View Post

    I do get small blood spots quite frequently (I'd say about 40% of the eggs have one), and it seems like they are far more common in the cage-free eggs, and in Eggland's Best. I very rarely see them in supermarket eggs, which I would assume come from very stressed-out chickens. I wonder if they somehow screen them out? I use the eggs anyway, and don't bother trying to get the blood spot out.
    They do screen them out, through a process called candling.
    "Is ice hockey hard? I don't know, you tell me. We need to have the strength and power of a football player, the stamina of a marathon runner and the concentration of a brain surgeon. But, we need to put all this together while moving at high speeds on a cold and slippery surface while 5 other guys use clubs to try and kill us. Oh, yeah, did I mention that this whole time we're standing on blades 1/8 of an inch thick. Is ice hockey hard? I don't know, you tell me. Next question."

  28. #28
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    Add me to the list of those who have experienced bad eggs! And fertilized ones. I lived on a primitive farm till I was 10 or 11 (how bad is it that I can't remember how old I was now), and we would see the occasional bad egg in the summer. I have even had an egg that had a very obvious chicken embryo *gag*. I know they are a delicacy in parts of Asia, but there is no way...
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  29. #29
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    I'm a bad egg!

    No, wait. That came out wrong.

    But I have had one experience with a bad egg while baking. Luckily, all I lost was some butter and sugar...nothing that I couldn't easily replace. Of course, it was the last egg, though, so I did have to go and buy more in order to continue what I had been making at the time...
    Erin

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