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Thread: Alternative names for "Aunt"

  1. #1
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    Sep 2004
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    Alternative names for "Aunt"

    Hi, Guys!
    Currently looking for other names for "Aunt." Cultural, other languages, or just fun, random ones.
    Thanks in advance!
    -Amy-

  2. #2
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    I'm part Hispanic and Italian so I call my aunt whose hispanic, Tia, and the one's who are Italian, Zia.
    I love cooking with wine sometimes I even put it in the food.

  3. #3
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    Our DGD calls her aunt "Nonni." We have no idea where it came from; she just started calling her by that when she started talking. She's 8 1/2 now, and it's still her name for my DD.
    Okay...it's time to pull up your big-girl panties and get on with it. (Seen on a bathroom wall.)

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  4. #4
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    Auntie

    I have several hispanic friends who's children Call me Tia. However they never add my given name, just Tia.

    I've heard of others who called Aunts "Nonnie" also, wonder what the origin?

  5. #5
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    I am Portuguese and my nieces and nephews call me Tia Anna. They have many aunts, so all are Tia then name. My SIL asked me what I wanted to be called before the first one was born and I chose Tia. I did not want to be called "Aunt Anna."

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  6. #6
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    Zia in Italian
    Tante in French

  7. #7
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    The French colloquial expression for aunt (like "auntie") is tata (my DS has a "tata Catherine"). Uncle is tonton, BTW.
    "In France, cooking is a serious art form and a national sport."
    --Julia Child

  8. #8
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    Polish Word for Aunt - Ciocia

    My nephew & niece call me Ciocia ..(its Polish). Spelled phoenetically its probably more like Chocha.

  9. #9
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    I think in Hindi it's either "mahsi" or "chachi"...depending on maternal or paternal...don't remember which is which.
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  10. #10
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    In Swedish, you would be a 'moster', if you are a maternal aunt, and 'faster', if you are a paternal aunt. Moster is pronounced mooster and faster is pronounced pretty much the same as how it reads in English. You could also be referred to as 'tant'.
    Last edited by oceanjasper; 03-12-2007 at 02:02 PM.

  11. #11
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    My nephews call me titi Vanessa

  12. #12
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    My niece calls me Teetee...she just couldn't say auntie when she was little and teetee came out. She's almost 13 now and still calls me that.

    We always called my aunts on my dad's side of the family Annie (A-knee)
    Stay-at-home mom scratch cooking for a child with a severe peanut and mustard allergy.

  13. #13
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    Tante in German as well.
    "Is ice hockey hard? I don't know, you tell me. We need to have the strength and power of a football player, the stamina of a marathon runner and the concentration of a brain surgeon. But, we need to put all this together while moving at high speeds on a cold and slippery surface while 5 other guys use clubs to try and kill us. Oh, yeah, did I mention that this whole time we're standing on blades 1/8 of an inch thick. Is ice hockey hard? I don't know, you tell me. Next question."

  14. #14
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    Tante is Dutch, too.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by hlao23 View Post
    I think in Hindi it's either "mahsi" or "chachi"...depending on maternal or paternal...don't remember which is which.
    Maasi is mother's sister and Bua is father's sister. Chachi is father's brother's wife...tai ji is father's oldest brothers wife...

    too much, I know!
    Anita

  16. #16
    My 19mo niece is named after me. She also has a twin brother. When I visit (which is only every few months) they can get very confused, especially my nephew. They have a difficult time differentiating between Aunt Annie and just Annie, so now I am referred to by my family nickname to avoid the confusion. We tried "big" Annie and "Little" Annie, but they don't understand big and little yet, either.

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