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Thread: Beth Hensperger's Oatmeal-Bulgur Bread

  1. #1
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    Beth Hensperger's Oatmeal-Bulgur Bread

    Just made this yesterday and it is delicious! My husband ate 2/3 of a loaf with dinner . I made it with thick-rolled oats, which made it a little chewy, and the bulgur added crunch. Also made it in two 9-in loaf pans, since that's all I have in my kitchen. Next time I may substitute a cup of whole wheat flour for a little more flavor.

    Amy

    Oatmeal-Bulgur Bread

    Beth Hensperger The Bread Bible

    Sponge
    1 Tbsp (1 package) active dry yeast
    2 Tbsp light brown sugar (I used dark since that's all I had)
    2/3 C bulgur, fine or medium grind
    2 1/4 C warm water (105-115 F)
    2 C unbleached all-purp or bread flour

    Dough:
    1 1/4 C regular rolled oats
    1/4 C wheat bran
    1/4 C light brown sugar (I used dark)
    3 Tbsp vegetable oil
    1 Tbs salt
    3 to 3 1/2 C unbleached all-purp or bread flour

    To make the spone: In a large bowl or the work bowl of a heavy-duty mixer, pour in the water. Sprinkle the yeast, 2 Tbsp of brown sugar, and bulgur what over the surface and let stand for 5 min. Add 2 C of flour and beat hard until well moistene3d and creamy, about 2 min. Cover with plastic wrap and let stand at room temp until foamy, about 1 hr.

    To make the dough: To the bowl with thte sponge, add the oats, bran, brown sugar, oil, and salt. Beat hard for about 1 minute. Add flour 1/2 C at a time, until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl. Switch to a wooden spoon when needed if mixing by hand.

    Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface and knead until smooth and elastic, about 4 min, dusting with flour as needed to prevent sticking.

    Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface and knead utnil smooth and elastic, about 4 min, or until the dough is smooth and springy and springs back when pressed. If desired, transfer the dough to a floured surface and knead briefly by hand.

    Place the dough in a greased deep container. Turn once to coat and cover with plastic wrap. Let rise at room temp until doubled, 1 1/2 to 2 hrs.

    Gently deflate the dough. Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface. Grease or parchment-ine a baking sheet or grease three 8x4-in loaf pans. Divide the dough into 3 equal portions and shape into loave. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rise until doubled, about 45 min.

    Slash the loaves no more than 1/4 inch deep. Bake in a preheated 375 deg oven 35-40 min. Let cool in pans 5 min and then remove and cool on a baking rack.

  2. #2
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    Thanks for posting this! I have another thread going about what's good from this book, since I just found it on the cheap at HPBooks (and it's new!). Do you have several good recipes from this cookbook yet? We can bake till we drop . . .
    If you're afraid of butter, use cream. ~~ Julia Child

    As you cook, you enjoy omniscience about food that no amount of label reading can match. Having retaken control of the meal from the food scientists, you know exactly what is in it. (Unless you start w/cream of mushroom soup, in which case all bets are off.) To reclaim control over one's food, to take it back from industry & science, is no small thing; indeed, in our time, cooking from scratch qualifies as subversive. ~~ Michael Pollan

  3. #3
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    Your thread was actually what inspired me to try something new from this book! I posted most of my favorites in that thread, although I forgot to include her whole wheat honey bread in that list. When I sat down to write that post, I realized what a rut I'd gotten into with that book. It almost opens automatically to the dozen or so recipes that I use all of the time!

    But no matter how many other new recipes I try, her buttermilk cornbread will probably be the only cornbread I make for the rest of my life - it's so light and has the perfect savory/sweet balance. Heaven!

    And my husband would be happy if the only two things I ever baked were her raisin bread (the perfect toasting bread) and the recipe she calls Celeste's Oatmeal Sunflower Bread.

    Enjoy the book!

    Amy

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by amyvn View Post
    Your thread was actually what inspired me to try something new from this book! . . . But no matter how many other new recipes I try, her buttermilk cornbread will probably be the only cornbread I make for the rest of my life - it's so light and has the perfect savory/sweet balance. Heaven!
    Glad to be an inspiration! Have you baked that buttermilk cornbread in cast-iron cornbread pans, or something else? I have always wanted pans like those, so when I saw them for very cheap $ at the outlet store, I just *had* to pick them up . . . so now I'm the proud owner of two pans that I don't know what to do with. Hah! Do you bake the cornbread after preheating the pans, just letting the remaining batter sit out for several minutes, & then dump out the baked sticks, add more cooking spray to the hot pans, & bake the next batch? The cast iron would hold the heat, so I imagine this'd work.

    Thanks for the suggestions! I'm going to sticky-note my book with everyone's TNT recipes, to give me a place to start.
    If you're afraid of butter, use cream. ~~ Julia Child

    As you cook, you enjoy omniscience about food that no amount of label reading can match. Having retaken control of the meal from the food scientists, you know exactly what is in it. (Unless you start w/cream of mushroom soup, in which case all bets are off.) To reclaim control over one's food, to take it back from industry & science, is no small thing; indeed, in our time, cooking from scratch qualifies as subversive. ~~ Michael Pollan

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by testkitchen45 View Post
    Glad to be an inspiration! Have you baked that buttermilk cornbread in cast-iron cornbread pans, or something else?
    I make it in an 8x8 Pyrex pan, or an 8x8 nonstick pan if the Pyrex is otherwise occupied. Either works, but the Pyrex gives it a nice crunchy crust that I really like.

    I've never used cast-iron cornbread pans, although I also look at them every time I see them. One of the things I like about cornbread is how easy and low-maintenance it is though, so they might not be for me if they require it to be cooked in batches!

    Amy

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