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Thread: Souffle pan substitution question--fast reply appreciated

  1. #1
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    Souffle pan substitution question--fast reply appreciated

    I am making a large chocolate souffle (i.e., not little individual ones). It calls for an 8 inch spring form pan. I have a 9 inch spring form or an 8 inch cake pan--which should I use? I am leaning toward the 9 inch spring form, but I don't have a lot of experience with souffles....

    TIA, Laura
    -Laura

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  2. #2
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    Since the recipe doesn't call for a souffle pan (which has higher sides), I'd use the 8" pan. Is it about the same depth? If not, then I'd make an aluminum-foil collar to go around the pan to add height & contain the souffle as it rises.

    I'd be afraid to use the 9" pan b/c it'll spread the mixture out a lot more, and reduce your baking time, but you (and I) don't know by how much it'll reduce it.
    If you're afraid of butter, use cream. ~~ Julia Child

    As you cook, you enjoy omniscience about food that no amount of label reading can match. Having retaken control of the meal from the food scientists, you know exactly what is in it. (Unless you start w/cream of mushroom soup, in which case all bets are off.) To reclaim control over one's food, to take it back from industry & science, is no small thing; indeed, in our time, cooking from scratch qualifies as subversive. ~~ Michael Pollan

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    Quote Originally Posted by testkitchen45 View Post
    Since the recipe doesn't call for a souffle pan (which has higher sides), I'd use the 8" pan. Is it about the same depth? If not, then I'd make an aluminum-foil collar to go around the pan to add height & contain the souffle as it rises.

    I'd be afraid to use the 9" pan b/c it'll spread the mixture out a lot more, and reduce your baking time, but you (and I) don't know by how much it'll reduce it.
    Ooops, you were fast but we lost internet and I went with the spring form. Well at least I have been fore warned to check it early. It is in the oven now. I doubt my cake pans had deep enough sides and the spring form pan has higher sides--if that ends up helping me at all (even with it spreading out more).

    Laura
    -Laura

    Muffins are for people who don't have the 'nads to order cake for breakfast.
    --Seth, "Kitchen Confidential" (the show, not the book)

    www.thespicedlife.com/

  4. #4
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    Actually, most springforms have higher sides and was probably why it was called for rather than an 8" cake pan.

    Laura, how did the souffle turn out?


    "Life isn't about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself" ~ George Bernard Shaw


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    Quote Originally Posted by Robyn1007 View Post
    Actually, most springforms have higher sides and was probably why it was called for rather than an 8" cake pan.

    Laura, how did the souffle turn out?
    Weeellllll... for a chocolate cake it turned out fine--and was especially impressive given that it was "light" (it was from Medrich's Chocolate and the Art of Low Fat Desserts). But suffice to say I just did not tell my guests that it was supposed to be a souffle. It did not have the look or texture of a souffle. Note to self: must buy an 8 inch spring form pan. *sigh*

    Laura
    -Laura

    Muffins are for people who don't have the 'nads to order cake for breakfast.
    --Seth, "Kitchen Confidential" (the show, not the book)

    www.thespicedlife.com/

  6. #6
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    I wonder why it called for an 8" springform instead of a souffle dish in the first place? I've never had a souffle call for a pan of any kind--always a 1.5-quart or 2-quart souffle dish. LOVE that cookbook, BTW.
    If you're afraid of butter, use cream. ~~ Julia Child

    As you cook, you enjoy omniscience about food that no amount of label reading can match. Having retaken control of the meal from the food scientists, you know exactly what is in it. (Unless you start w/cream of mushroom soup, in which case all bets are off.) To reclaim control over one's food, to take it back from industry & science, is no small thing; indeed, in our time, cooking from scratch qualifies as subversive. ~~ Michael Pollan

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    Quote Originally Posted by testkitchen45 View Post
    I wonder why it called for an 8" springform instead of a souffle dish in the first place? I've never had a souffle call for a pan of any kind--always a 1.5-quart or 2-quart souffle dish. LOVE that cookbook, BTW.
    Talk to me about souffle dishes then. What makes it a souffle dish? The very fact that it called for a spring form made me wary of trying a regular cake pan--after all the ability to remove the outer shell of the pan is a pretty specific requirement. Should a souffle normally be able to just come out of a regular pan? I have only made individual souffles before..... (and always chocolate, I should add ).

    Laura
    -Laura

    Muffins are for people who don't have the 'nads to order cake for breakfast.
    --Seth, "Kitchen Confidential" (the show, not the book)

    www.thespicedlife.com/

  8. #8
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    As per Epicurious:

    Soufflés are customarily baked in a classic soufflé dish, which is round and has straight sides to facilitate the soufflé's rising. These special dishes are ovenproof and come in a variety of sizes ranging from 3 1/2-ounce (individual) to 2-quart. They're available in kitchenware shops and the housewares section of most department stores. Foil or parchment "collars" are sometimes wrapped around the outside of a soufflé dish so that the top of the foil or paper rises about 2 inches above the rim of the dish. Such collars are used for cold dessert soufflés so that the sides of the frozen or molded mixture are supported until they set. Once the collar is removed, the soufflé stands tall and appears to "rise" out of the dish.
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  9. #9
    Did you make the Fallen Chocolate Souffle Torte from the book? That's a flourless (or almost-flourless) chocolate cake, leavened with egg foam. Typically, flourless chocolate cakes call for springform pans. The texture should be more substantial than a souffle (pudding), but more airy and mousse-like than a light cake.

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    Well, first Medrich expects her cake to fall--it is a fallen souffle, that might be one reason she doesn't call for the souffle dish. Second, she definitely wants it taken out of the pan, which that description does not sound like getting the souffle out of the souffle dish neatly would necessarily be easy (am I wrong?). Last, she makes a point of saying that if you don't like the fallen top look you can serve the cake upside down. So maybe her fallen souffle isn't really a typical souffle?.....
    -Laura

    Muffins are for people who don't have the 'nads to order cake for breakfast.
    --Seth, "Kitchen Confidential" (the show, not the book)

    www.thespicedlife.com/

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljt2r View Post
    Well, first Medrich expects her cake to fall--it is a fallen souffle, that might be one reason she doesn't call for the souffle dish. Second, she definitely wants it taken out of the pan, which that description does not sound like getting the souffle out of the souffle dish neatly would necessarily be easy (am I wrong?). Last, she makes a point of saying that if you don't like the fallen top look you can serve the cake upside down. So maybe her fallen souffle isn't really a typical souffle?.....
    No, a fallen souffle is different than a traditional souffle, Pam gives a good description in the post above yours.


    "Life isn't about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself" ~ George Bernard Shaw


  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robyn1007 View Post
    No, a fallen souffle is different than a traditional souffle, Pam gives a good description in the post above yours.
    She posted at the same time as me, which is why I missed it.
    -Laura

    Muffins are for people who don't have the 'nads to order cake for breakfast.
    --Seth, "Kitchen Confidential" (the show, not the book)

    www.thespicedlife.com/

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by PamN View Post
    Did you make the Fallen Chocolate Souffle Torte from the book? That's a flourless (or almost-flourless) chocolate cake, leavened with egg foam. Typically, flourless chocolate cakes call for springform pans. The texture should be more substantial than a souffle (pudding), but more airy and mousse-like than a light cake.
    Ahhhh.... well.... that explains a lot then. Well my guess is the top still did not have the attractive (in a rustic sort of way) fallen look of hers, probably bc I used the wrong sized pan, but otherwise maybe the texture was correct then.
    -Laura

    Muffins are for people who don't have the 'nads to order cake for breakfast.
    --Seth, "Kitchen Confidential" (the show, not the book)

    www.thespicedlife.com/

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