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Thread: How To Caramelize Sweetened Condensed Milk

  1. #1
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    How To Caramelize Sweetened Condensed Milk

    I remember seeing something about doing it in the can in boiling water for a couple hours but can't for the life of me seem to find any recipe of the sort. Anyone got any leads for me? Specially looking for recipe to caramelize SCM in the CAN (*NOT* pouring it out of the can). Thx.

  2. #2
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    I think it's in my Chilean cookbook at home if you don't get an answer before this evening I'll look. FYI, in Chile it's called "manjar" but you can also google "dulce de leche" for the same thing.


    "Life isn't about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself" ~ George Bernard Shaw


  3. #3
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    I'm only seeing where you do not leave it in the can. Says it can explode. Seems fairly easy using the oven method...not so hands on as the microwave.

    • To carmelize sweetened condensed milk: When heated (by microwave, oven or stovetop), sweetened condensed milk becomes thick, turns a rich golden color and takes on the flavor of caramel.

    • Microwave oven method: Pour milk into a 2-quart glass or ceramic container. Cook at medium (50 percent power) for 4 minutes, stirring halfway through. Reduce power to medium-low (30 percent power); cook for 12 to 18 minutes, stirring briskly every 2 minutes until smooth, thick and caramel-colored. The cooking time will depend on the wattage of your oven.

    • Oven method: Pour sweetened condensed milk into a 9-inch pie plate and cover with foil. Place the pie plate in a larger pan; fill the pan with hot water that reaches halfway up the side of the pie plate. Bake at 425F for 1 1/2 hours, or until thick and caramel-colored.

    • Stovetop method: Pour milk into the top of a double boiler and cook over simmering water for 1 1/2 hours. At the end of the cooking time (whichever method you use), beat the caramel until smooth.

    Heating an unopened can of sweetened condensed milk can cause it to explode.
    Everyone needs to believe in something. I believe I'll have another beer. . .

  4. #4
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    OMG --- DUHHHHHHHHHHHH I completely didn't think of Dulce de Leche but you're right. I googled it and found it!! Thanks for the lead Robyn007!

    The classic in-the-can method is simple: Place an unopened can (or do a few at once) of sweetened condensed milk in a pot, well covered with water, and bring the water to a boil. Keep at a low boil for two to three hours, making sure the water level always stays above the top of the can (if the can isnít submerged, it may explode). The longer it cooks, the thicker the dulce de leche will be; after two hours, youíll be able to drizzle it, and after three hours, it will be thick enough to sandwich cookies. Make sure the can is thoroughly cool before you open it.

  5. #5
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    And I must thank you because I did some googling for manjar and found a source for my beloved lucuma which is a fruit that is pureed and used in baking from Chile. I just placed an order and am beyond excited!


    "Life isn't about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself" ~ George Bernard Shaw


  6. #6
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    For those that want to go a step further in curiosity, I'm making the following recipe (adpated from nookandpantry blog)


    picture courtesy of nookandpantry

    ALFAJORES
    The Alfajor, also known as a Caramel Sandwich Cookie, is a traditional Latin American cookie although you'll find a variation of it in Spain that's usually served during Christmas. Two round biscuits are spread with dulce de leche and sprinkled with powdered sugar. The premise changes a bit depending on the country, and some varieties are rolled in coconut, chopped peanuts, or dipped in chocolate.

    1 1/4 C flour
    1/2 C corn starch
    1/4 tsp baking powder
    1/8 tsp salt
    1/4 C sugar
    1 stick of butter
    1 egg
    1/2 tsp vanilla extract

    Dulce de leche
    Powdered sugar
    Cinnamon (optional)

    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

    Beat the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. In another bowl whisk together the flour (starting with 1 cup), cornstarch, baking powder, and salt and set aside.

    Add the egg and vanilla to the butter and beat until smooth. Add the dry ingredients and beat until the dough comes together. Add some of the remaining 1/4 C of flour if the dough is too wet.

    Roll out the dough to about 1/4 in thickness and cut into whatever shape you desire. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes or until the edges are light golden brown.

    Cool on a rack and fill with a teaspoon or more of dulce de leche.

    Dust the tops with some powdered sugar (add a tiny bit of cinnamon if preferred).

  7. #7
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    my mom has made this my whole life (and her mom made it before, etc) and calls it brown wiggle (she uses the can in a water bath method)
    - Josie


  8. #8

    Tried n True

    Quote Originally Posted by PAMMELA View Post

    ‚ÄĘ Heating an unopened can of sweetened condensed milk can cause it to explode.
    Well I suppose that is a good warning, something to think about, I know I did the first time I ever tried it. But I thought it was a kewel science experiment. Waiting for two hours or so then opening it to see a perfect creamy no worry about burning caramely delight! A friend said it goes great into a chocolate pie shell. Nice of the poster to leave a recipe, we aren't big caramel, fans so we just tasted it and tossed it. But it was really neat to try with preteen agers back in the day.
    As far as exploding goes I have since decided that its highly unlikely as not enough pressure can build up from the milk. Defiantly interesting change.

  9. #9
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    That is nice of you to reply to the thread, but FYI, it is 5 years old.

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