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Thread: How to cook a Beef Round Sirloin Tip Roast?

  1. #1

    How to cook a Beef Round Sirloin Tip Roast?

    DH has been craving a pot roast and I haven't been able to bring myself to fork over the $$. Well, yesterday he came home w/ a Beef Round Sirloin Tip. This is not a cut I am familiar w/ and my google searches this morning are not helping sort out my need to know how to cook this.

    The Beef Council site and various other sites w/ pics attached show this cut as being more of a large, hunk of meat. What I have is a flat slab. The market he got it from is closed on Sunday, but I do trust that it is marked correctly.

    Does anyone know what I should do w/ this? I'm also reading conflicting info on dry baking on a roasting rack (huge hunk) vs braising in a liquid (no pics to see what they used looks like).

    Thank you to anyone who is around today and can offer any info.
    "I can read and write if that's what you mean. I'm not thick or anything just don't ask me where the commas go."
    Incendiary by Chris Cleave

  2. #2
    My first choice would be to braise it. This cut will be tough if you dry roast it to medium well or well-done. If you like it rare or med rare, then roasting or broiling may be fine. If you do want to broil or roast you might try a tenderizer (I use the Adolph's brand).

    Quality makes a difference too. A "choice" cut with fat marbled through it is always more tender and tasty than a lesser quality. "Prime" cuts are hard to find, but if you went to a specialty meat market then it might be "prime" and I'd probably use a dry heat method for that and leave it a bit on the rare side.

  3. #3
    Mundy: thank you for your reply. It is a choice cut and we like medium rare. I've never done a dry roast before (only braised), so this may be my first attempt at dry. We don't eat a lot of beef, and it feels really weird to be almost afraid of a piece of meat!

    Thanks again!
    "I can read and write if that's what you mean. I'm not thick or anything just don't ask me where the commas go."
    Incendiary by Chris Cleave

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by rosen View Post
    We don't eat a lot of beef, and it feels really weird to be almost afraid of a piece of meat!
    We DO eat a lot of beef, and I'm often afraid of meat! Cuts of beef can be so finicky, where 10 minutes can be the difference between tender and juicy and tough and dry.

    My husband loves the look of lean meat. He knows that I use a lot of lean chuck roasts for most of our beef dinners, but he HATES seeing fat or marbling. Any time he sees an eye of round roast or a sirloin roast he grabs it and says "Wow, this will make a wonderful pot roast with carrots and potatoes!" I have to wrench it out of his hand every time and remind him that you can't make an extremely lean cut into a 'fork tender' pot roast. Lean cuts like that are better as 'roast beef'. I have a Showtime Rotisserie, and every sirloin tip or eye of round roast the man brings home ends up coated with a spectacular rub, and turning on the rotisserie spit until medium rare to medium, then sliced thin with a roasted garlic red wine/beef sauce. That's the only way I can make a cut like that tasty and tender.

    I'd also welcome other ways to cook the sirloin tip roast, but so far the rotisserie is my only way! Anyone?
    ~ "The right shoe can change your life...."- Cinderella ~

  5. #5
    Jewel: I appreciate your comments! We ended up not cooking the beef last night as weekend projects made the time get away from me. I'll be going by that particular grocery today and will stop by the butcher counter and ask their advice, too.

    We don't have a rotisserie, so my dry method would have to be a roasting rack and pan. I've just never done a "dry" roast w/ beef, so this will be a real adventure for me! But I'm very willing to learn.

    Hope that more beef eaters will see this post today and add in their tips, too.
    "I can read and write if that's what you mean. I'm not thick or anything just don't ask me where the commas go."
    Incendiary by Chris Cleave

  6. #6
    As you mention it's a flat slab, I'd be tempted to treat it as London Broil or other lean, flat cuts would be treated. Use a quick high temp to sear the outside of the meat, then into a 325-350 degrees F oven until meat is around 145 degrees F for medium rare. Pull it and let it rest, covered, for 15 mintues.

    However if it's a flat, marbled cut of meat like a chuck steak is, then I'd be tempted to pot roast or braise it for several hours at a very low temp.

    I'm interested to hear what the butcher says.

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