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Thread: Vessel sink vs undermount?

  1. #1
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    Vessel sink vs undermount?

    We are re-modeling our bathroom and I am trying to decide if I want to put in vessel sinks or a type of undermount. We put travertine floors in and the shower is tiled.
    If any one has pros and cons from either one, I am all ears. Also let me know what your vanity top is (granite, solid surface, etc) if you have an opinion either way with the sink choices.

  2. #2
    If it were me, I would save a vessel sink for a 1/2 bath where pretty much all you are doing is washing your hands. For a sink that would get a lot of use, like in a master bath or wherever, I would prefer an undermount sink. I think it would be easier to use and easier to clean.

    But I love the look of vessel sinks!

  3. #3
    I wanted vessel sinks, but everyone I talked to said that they are best left to areas where there is less traffic. They are difficult to clean around, and there are splash problems. My countertops are stone tile, and I installed drop in sinks.
    Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.

  4. #4
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    I agree with the OPs on the vessel sink vs. undermount.

    My only bathroom opinion here is with the edge type for your countertop. Mine is cultured marble with an ogee edge; here's a random pic of an ogee from the Internet:

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    When we remodel our master bath someday, I do NOT want an ogee edge. The bottom of it is vulnerable to chipping; in fact, our marble tops have teeny little chips all the way along the heavily used areas. I'd probably do a simple bullnose (rounded). Hope that helps.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chefzhat View Post
    I wanted vessel sinks, but everyone I talked to said that they are best left to areas where there is less traffic. They are difficult to clean around, and there are splash problems. My countertops are stone tile, and I installed drop in sinks.
    thanks for the info. what material are your sinks made of? I knew vessels were harder to clean around , they look really cool though!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by lindrusso View Post
    If it were me, I would save a vessel sink for a 1/2 bath where pretty much all you are doing is washing your hands. For a sink that would get a lot of use, like in a master bath or wherever, I would prefer an undermount sink. I think it would be easier to use and easier to clean.

    But I love the look of vessel sinks!
    This is what we did. We have undermount sinks in the master bath, and vessel sinks in the guest bath. I love both, but I really wouldn't want to deal with vessel sinks in the master. We have granite counter tops in both bathrooms.
    Okay...it's time to pull up your big-girl panties and get on with it. (Seen on a bathroom wall.)

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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by pharmarepgirl View Post
    thanks for the info. what material are your sinks made of? I knew vessels were harder to clean around , they look really cool though!
    porcelain. I got mine from American Standard.
    Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.

  8. #8
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    Like others said, don't use a vessel sink in a frequent-use bathroom!

    As far as counter top choice, we have a bit of everything.....cultured marble in the kids bathroom b/c it's so easy to keep clean with the integrated sinks and I didn't want to spend the money on Corian b/c their vanity is soooo long. For a smaller guest bathroom we used a granite remnant (much less than buying a whole slab). One half bath is a furniture style piece that comes attached with a ceramic type counter/sink combo - very pretty. (And another half bath has a pedestal sink. But for our master bath we went with engineered quartz....which is generally more durable and less pourous than Corian or granite (respecitvely) for a bathroom setting.

    Here's my previous notes on counter options (take it all with a grain of salt):

    - Granite:
    o Granite is porous and will stain; therefore it must be sealed and polished regularly (not always - generally speaking). Light colored granites are much more difficult.
    o Honing will tone down the 'speckled' nature as well as the shine. "Honed" versus "polished" is a definite consumer choice. Do you want a matte finish (honed) or gloss finish (polished)? There are also several types of "honed" finishes. Not every granite looks good honed, and you should always bring a sample home and do stain tests on it to make sure it is not so porous that it stains easily. Honed is often more porous. Do not get black honed.
    o Lemon Juice Test: Take a piece of the scrap "granite" you want to test and spill a few drops of lemon juice onto it. If you see that under the drops of lemon it develops very quickly dark spots, it means that it's a very absorbent stone and I would advise you against it. If it takes, say, a minute or so to be absorbed, then you're dealing with a degree of absorbency that's easily manageable with the application of a good-quality impregnator-type sealer. If it doesn't absorb at all, then you have a winner right there!


    - Engineered Stone:
    o The six brands of engineered stone “Quartz” (Silestone, Zodiaq, Cambria, Avanza, Technistone, and Casear Stone) all require zero maintenance, and all come with a warranty, unlike granite. The aesthetic difference is that the ES's are more uniform and homogenius (and somewhat unnatural looking) than granite. About same money as granite.

    - Solid Surface: (Corian)
    o Made from polyester or acrylic resins, solid surface counters are easy to keep clean and small scratches and burns can be removed with sandpaper. (or so they say, I've never tried it?)
    o Also come with integrated sinks.


    - Others:
    o Marble (Carrara) - stains easily
    o Tile - difficult to keep grout lines clean
    o Soapstone - doesn't stain, but must be sealed periodically with mineral oil. It's soft, so it's more prone to scratches than granite, but isn't damaged by hot pots and pans.
    o Travertine and Limestone - scratch easily
    o Laminate – solid-core is more brittle than regular laminate.
    Amy

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