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Thread: New Food Ideas For 15 Month Old With 6 Teeth?

  1. #1

    New Food Ideas For 15 Month Old With 6 Teeth?

    For those of you with toddlers, what types of food do you feed them?? My DS eats A LOT, but he also seems to get bored with the food he eats. I try and try new things, but he also doesn't seem to want the new stuff. I know you are supposed to keep trying, which I do, but I'm just running out of ideas of what to give him. Here is a list of things he devours:

    Pancakes
    Waffles
    Nutri-Grain bars
    Morningstar breakfast sausages
    Blueberries
    Bananas
    Grapes (cut up)
    Strawberries
    Boca Burgers
    Crackers
    Diced string cheese (only cheese I can get him to eat)
    Beans (black, kidney, refried)
    Egg noodles (only pasta I can seem to get him to eat)
    Yogurt
    Jello


    Sometimes I can get him to eat chicken, once he ate a real meat burger, but won't eat it now. Once in a while he'll eat a piece of toast with some peanut butter thinly spread on it. He sometimes eats peas and green beans, eats cheerios from time to time. He won't eat potatoes unless it's a french fry, and even that he'll only eat one or two. I've tried mashed potatoes and he spits that right out. I've tried rice and he spits that out, too. I know the things he eats are pretty good, but he does seem to get bored with it, especially since that seems to be all I can get him to eat and therefore he's eating it all the time.

    So, what do you server a 15 month old who only has 6 teeth (4 upper and 2 bottom)??

  2. #2
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    Have you tried the following:

    shredded cheese
    tortillas
    sweet potatoes - you could bake them like french fries
    banana, pumpkin or zucchini bread
    apple sauce
    thinly sliced oranges with the peal
    Japanese-style rice crackers
    Pirates Booty
    Go for it!

  3. #3
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    Honestly, I think that's a great list for a 15 month old. One thing I didn't notice, and something both my kids loved was creamed spinach.
    - Kiran

  4. #4
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    One other suggestion is canned carrots and canned green beans. DS loved them!
    Go for it!

  5. #5
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    My daughter always loved soups. I would make some homemade chicken stock (to limit the sodium) and put in veggies and whole grain pasta or rice and some chicken or beef. She also loved tomato-based soups.

    How about:
    eggs (like in a frittata or baked egg dish)
    grilled cheese sandwiches or quesadillas
    chunky applesauce/pear sauce
    mandarin oranges
    soy chicken patties (my DD loves to dip meat)
    baked/grilled fish/shrimp

  6. #6
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    Here are some of the things my DD loves (17 months and 10 teeth)

    Eggs
    Jalsberg cheese- that was the first one she would eat. Kind of nutty and sweet
    Cottage Cheese
    Cream Cheese
    Zucchini- sliced and steamed- she loved it!
    Frozen peas and corn- I do not even bother to defrost them
    Plain Yogurt
    Pears- I just peel it and give it whole to DD and she chows down- won't eat it any other way.
    Cereal (like shredded wheat) soaked in milk
    Quesadilla
    Kiwi
    Ravilois and Tortelinis
    Asparagus
    Brussel Sprouts

    Of course my DD will love these things one week and refuse them the next. The fun thing she is doing now is screaming bloody murder when I try to get her in the high chair- gotta love those toddlers!
    "You can say any foolish thing to a dog, and the dog will give you a look that says, 'Wow, you're right! I never would've thought of that!" Dave Barry

  7. #7
    Thanks for all the replies so far. I agree, I think it is a pretty good list for a 15 month old. It's just that he seems to get bored with those foods because really, those are the foods he eats day in and day out. For instance, sometimes he'll just gobble up a banana and gets sooo excited when he sees I'm cutting up a banana, then the next day he just looks at it and throws it off his high chair. I know that there are a number of foods listed and I do switch it around so he's not eating exactly the same thing everyday, but he still gets bored with it.

    I've tried the sweet potatoes, grilled cheese & quesadillas, salmon, scrambled eggs, cooked carrots and he doesn't like those. He either just spits it right back out or just looks at it, picks it up and tosses it on the floor. Actually, I just thought that he did kind of like quiche, so I'll have to try that again. He does love fruit, so I'll try the mandarin oranges. He does like applesauce, so I'll give that a whirl again, too. I've also given him some dehydrated apples, which he likes one day and not the next. I tried little bits of a Honeycrisp apple today, which he liked. I just get a little nervous with that, so I know I won't give him fresh apples every day or anything. I'll give the soy chicken patties a try, but sometimes he's a bit iffy with the breaded chicken. Sometimes he'll eat a breaded chicken nugget, but mostly he won't eat it unless it is a real piece of chicken, not formed.

    Thanks again!

  8. #8
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    Here's my 2cp for all they are worth:

    We exclusively table fed my oldest at that age. If he didn't want what we had, I certainly couldn't force it into him, but there was no way I planned on making something else for him to eat. He went through a few phases where he'd only eat what he liked from the plate, but then we would counter that by serving him courses to get to what he wanted.

    Ethan is 3 now, and he eats everything we do. Last night was roasted cauliflower, chicken in a sweet salsa sauce, and rice pilaf. He ate all of it, and my 5mo enjoyed smashed up roasted cauliflower and got a taste of the sauce.

    I just worry that you'll still be stuck feeding your kids something else daily years from now, and life is so much easier once everyone eats the same things. We eat better as a family now since I'm trying hard to get all sorts of veggies into my children's diet from a young age.
    -- Nancy

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Couperine View Post
    Here's my 2cp for all they are worth:

    We exclusively table fed my oldest at that age. If he didn't want what we had, I certainly couldn't force it into him, but there was no way I planned on making something else for him to eat. He went through a few phases where he'd only eat what he liked from the plate, but then we would counter that by serving him courses to get to what he wanted.

    Ethan is 3 now, and he eats everything we do. Last night was roasted cauliflower, chicken in a sweet salsa sauce, and rice pilaf. He ate all of it, and my 5mo enjoyed smashed up roasted cauliflower and got a taste of the sauce.

    I just worry that you'll still be stuck feeding your kids something else daily years from now, and life is so much easier once everyone eats the same things. We eat better as a family now since I'm trying hard to get all sorts of veggies into my children's diet from a young age.
    Ditto. I might have cut some things down into tinier bites or even blitzed them in the processor if I thought it was necessary, but yes we feed our toddlers what we eat. Completely.

    ETA except when I accidentally make something too spicy--although even then I try to incorporate it into their meal (for exs I recently purchased Indian that turned out quite spicy and so I made theirs half plain yogurt and they loved it).
    -Laura

    Muffins are for people who don't have the 'nads to order cake for breakfast.
    --Seth, "Kitchen Confidential" (the show, not the book)

    www.thespicedlife.com/

  10. #10
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    Sorry if some of these have been mentioned, I probably forgot

    smoothies (I mix yogurt, milk and whatever fruit we have on hand)
    pineapple
    macaroni and cheese
    spaghetti
    meatballs/turkey meatballs (my toddler hates meat, but will eat turkey meatballs)
    hummus (some kids love dips!)
    french toast
    brocolli
    other types of cereal--Kix, maybe?
    Blogging Fun
    Don't eat anything your great-grandmother wouldn't recognize as food. -Michael Pollan

  11. #11
    What about raisin english muffins, cantelope, watermelon, raw tomatoes. My son is 14 months old with 6 teeth only too. He's still on baby jarred meats because I'm scared he'll choke on meat/chicken. How do you prepare his meat/chicken?

  12. #12
    witchy - the only real meat my DS eats is chicken. I don't cook it too often, but when I do it's either boiled, baked in the oven or pan fried. I do make chicken tenders sometimes. I just make sure that I cut up the chicken into little enough pieces or shred it into little shreds. I know what you mean about being nervous that your son might choke. I'm that way, too.

  13. #13
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    [QUOTE=ljt2r;1423328]Ditto. I might have cut some things down into tinier bites or even blitzed them in the processor if I thought it was necessary, but yes we feed our toddlers what we eat. Completely.
    [QUOTE]


    I have a question about this...what do you do when your toddlers refuse to eat what you are eating? Do you just let them cry and not give them anything else? Or do you just give them something else that you know they will eat?

    I want so badly for my DD to eat what I am eating but she is so stubborn and picky. Last night we had pork tenderloin and cauliflower for dinner. She would not touch either of them. She would rather starve and scream before eating something she does not want. And then I pay for it when she wakes up in the middle of the night hungry. What would you have done?
    "You can say any foolish thing to a dog, and the dog will give you a look that says, 'Wow, you're right! I never would've thought of that!" Dave Barry

  14. #14
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    [QUOTE=PoppyJ;1423772][QUOTE=ljt2r;1423328]Ditto. I might have cut some things down into tinier bites or even blitzed them in the processor if I thought it was necessary, but yes we feed our toddlers what we eat. Completely.


    I have a question about this...what do you do when your toddlers refuse to eat what you are eating? Do you just let them cry and not give them anything else? Or do you just give them something else that you know they will eat?

    I want so badly for my DD to eat what I am eating but she is so stubborn and picky. Last night we had pork tenderloin and cauliflower for dinner. She would not touch either of them. She would rather starve and scream before eating something she does not want. And then I pay for it when she wakes up in the middle of the night hungry. What would you have done?
    I would still serve the pork and cauliflower but would also include one or two other things I know she would eat. That way she would still be exposed to what you are eating but if necessary, could fill up on the stuff she likes. For instance, I might serve some oranges and cheese along with the main dinner. I don't think you need to get in the habit of cooking an entire seperate meal.....
    Go for it!

  15. #15
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    PoppyJ - it's annoying and frustrating as all get out when they decide not to eat what you've cooked. DS did go to bed hungry a few times, and yes he woke up, but I repeated that it was his choice to not eat dinner (definitely some cry-it-out afterwards). I always gave him something I knew he liked the next morning, but he figured it out about dinner fairly quick. In the end, I was more stubborn about the situation than he was.

    We went through a pretty long dip phase where a tablespoon of ranch dressing, ketchup, etc made all food seem more interesting. If it helps them taste things willingly, I'm game. My 20 yo stepson doesn't still put bbq sauce in his milk, but one night when he was young that made his milk seem awesome.

    A bit of a tangent, but hopefully this helps! My 3yo actually eats more variety than his dad because we eat things for lunch that his father hates.
    -- Nancy

  16. #16
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    [QUOTE=PoppyJ;1423772][QUOTE=ljt2r;1423328]Ditto. I might have cut some things down into tinier bites or even blitzed them in the processor if I thought it was necessary, but yes we feed our toddlers what we eat. Completely.


    I have a question about this...what do you do when your toddlers refuse to eat what you are eating? Do you just let them cry and not give them anything else? Or do you just give them something else that you know they will eat?

    I want so badly for my DD to eat what I am eating but she is so stubborn and picky. Last night we had pork tenderloin and cauliflower for dinner. She would not touch either of them. She would rather starve and scream before eating something she does not want. And then I pay for it when she wakes up in the middle of the night hungry. What would you have done?
    OK I have 3 responses, esp since I don't know the age of your toddler. And look this always seems a little sensitive, and every kid is different AND what every parent can hack is different. I am VERY stubborn about food issues--it's just the war I choose to fight, you know?

    Answer number 1: I do usually try to make sure there is something they will like. I do not have picky kids so this is not restrictive, granted, and I don't let them be too tunnel visioned (for exs: they cannot keeping getting a billion servings of rice and not touch anything else, they can have one or 2).

    Answer #2: I expose my children to my enjoyment. I know this sounds weird, but most kids, IME, are interested in stuff if you love. I tend to say "Mmmmm" a lot when I am eating and while I feel like an idiot typing that, it does really work. My kids WANT to eat what I am eating because I like it so much, you know? I don't ask them to eat it, I just tell them what I am making and how much I like it and ask them where they want it on their plates. If they then tdon't touch it I ignore it and NEVER make a fuss over it. They could love it one night and refuse to eat it the next--toddlers are like that...

    which brings me to IMHO the most important answer, #3 (and lest I sound too crazy, I have had 2 peds <I moved> who both agreed strongly with this before they even knew I did it but I don't know too many others who do it): I do not regard dinner as being... nutritionally important. I regard it as purely social development--social in the sense of learning how to behave during dinner, learning to talk to us about her day AND being exposed to tons of different foods--and I mean really different, in my house we eat almost exclusively from international cookbooks. They have a before bed snack, during which any calorie loss from dinner is made up. Something healthy, like nuts or cheese or yogurt or fruits and veggies--but usually something protein and fat also so it fills them. Because my personal nightmare is having a kid who reacts negatively to food--for me it is not about whether they eat it so much as the fact that they don't get mad about it, they regard it as normal, if they are not in the mood for it that night, whatever they eat some other part of the meal.

    Oh I just thought of a number 4 (sorry, can you tell I think about this a lot) I probably cook 80% one pot meals. That way they are always being exposed to different foods within the dish too. Are there some they don't eat? Sure, onions. I think it is texture, because clearly the dish still tastes like onions and they just ignore them, they never remark on them. Are there some that time has worked in my favor and they ignored at first but now eat? Yes, like cooked bell pepper--see onion comments. And some they have liked from the get-go, like beans and corn and broccoli, etc etc, and they eat some nights but some nights they become obsessed with some other aspect of the meal so they do not eat them so well. As long as they do not comment negatively, I ignore it. IF they comment, they get a lecture about etiquette and insulting what people have worked hard to provide for them.

    I hope this helps. I think it is important to remember that whatever you think a toddler does not like--it just means they did not like it that night. Sure there are some exceptions, but if you ignore it and keep giving it to them without turning it into a battle (which you will never win in any one individual meal since you cannot force feed them) there will probably be a night they eat it.
    -Laura

    Muffins are for people who don't have the 'nads to order cake for breakfast.
    --Seth, "Kitchen Confidential" (the show, not the book)

    www.thespicedlife.com/

  17. #17
    I think my son has not been too picky yet. Although this weekend he really made me upset when I cooked him a ravioli and some frozen veggies and he proceed to take everything and throw it off the tray table on his high chair. I felt defeated and ended up giving him some jarred baby food. I think every kid is different and what works for one kid may not work for you. Do what you think is best, trust your judgement and also do what works for your lifestyle.

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