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Thread: Ever eat winter squash skin?

  1. #1
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    Ever eat winter squash skin?

    A couple weeks back Guy Fieri was doing a butternut squash recipe and remarked that it was completely unnecessary to peel off the skin, as it was perfectly edible, which was something I'd never thought of.

    Last evening I was trying out an acorn squash recipe for the crockpot. The squash was just seeded and chunked and thrown into the pot with honey, white wine and soy sauce. As soon as I did it, I started thinking what a nuisance it was going to be to eat, as opposed to one that's simply halved.

    A couple hours along, we had what turned into a twelve hour blackout that lasted til six this morning. I was ticked that I had the crockpot going, then thought about it and realized there was nothing there to spoil, so when the power came back on at six this morning, I just let it restart and finish. When I went to try it out, I decided to eat the pieces skin and all, and it was fine, adding a little texture (and I assume fiber) to it, almost exactly like an apple. As it happens I almost always leave apple and pear skins on, too. Obviously, this wouldn't be so hot with roasted squash.

    Just curious: anyone else ever do this?

    Bob

  2. #2
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    I eat it sometimes... I especially enjoy the pieces that get really caramelized when you roast winter squash. It kind of sticks to my teeth in a really pleasant caramely way
    - Josie


  3. #3
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    I do this too, my dad thought I was nuts. Not the bumpy buttercup ones, but mostly just with roasted acorn squash, I kinda like the texture/crunch. I think as long as you wash it...it's fine right?

  4. #4
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    I watched Jamie Oliver do this on his pumpkin show of Jamie At Home, and after hearing him say that peeling was unnecessary, I thought I'd try it. It must have been the acorn squash I used, because I just chunked it up and threw it in my stew, and I thought it was horrible. I'm thinking maybe my squash was not very fresh, because the peel and the squash right under it turned hard and fibrous, very unpleasant to eat.

    But it WAS nice to not peel the squash, so maybe I'll try that again, now that I know it does work.
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  5. #5
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    I've eaten and enjoyed the skin of delicata squash, roasted, but I've not tried any other variety.
    Abby

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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrswaz View Post
    I watched Jamie Oliver do this on his pumpkin show of Jamie At Home, and after hearing him say that peeling was unnecessary, I thought I'd try it. It must have been the acorn squash I used, because I just chunked it up and threw it in my stew, and I thought it was horrible. I'm thinking maybe my squash was not very fresh, because the peel and the squash right under it turned hard and fibrous, very unpleasant to eat.

    But it WAS nice to not peel the squash, so maybe I'll try that again, now that I know it does work.

    I watched that show too and thought....gee I don't know....it just doesn't appeal (no pun intended) to me.

  7. #7
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    Thumbs up

    I always nibbled the skin of my roasted butternut squash thinking I was indulging in a culinary no-no. I'm glad I'm in good company and on top of my trends.
    For Pete's sake, now I blog!
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  8. #8
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    I love eating the skin of roasted acorn and butternut squash. My SO always gives me a weird look, but that just means I get to eat it all myself!

  9. #9
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    I leave the peel on so many other vegetables and fruits (it's usually my favorite part), yet it never dawned on me to leave it on squash. I'm definitely going to try it.
    "If you aren't living on the edge, you're taking up too much space."

  10. #10
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    I recently tried eating the skin of a roasted delicata squash after reading somewhere on the CLBB that the skin was edible.
    Last edited by oceanjasper; 10-29-2008 at 08:00 PM.
    "Auntie, you are a good cooker." ~ My nephew, age 5

  11. #11
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    [Just to show my age, every time I see this thread title I hear a twangy voice say "Ever eat a pine tree? Many parts ARE edible."]

    Back to your regularly scheduled thread.
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  12. #12
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    Nigella says yes, leave the skin on!

    I heard an interview with Nigella Lawson this morning on NPR's Morning Edition and pulled this off the NPR website to share (I hope I'm citing this correctly).

    And squash can be easy to work with, too. For instance, Lawson said that she will usually seed them and chop them up but she leaves the skin on.

    "I'm a lazy person, so I'm always looking for ways to eat fabulously well without too much effort," she said.

    Once the roasted butternut squash comes out of the oven, Lawson crumbles blue cheese over the chunks, letting the tangy bits play against the sweet and mellow gourd. And she adds pecans, which are plentiful in the autumn.

    The dish can substitute for a meat entree, Lawson said. And if you have some nice salad leaves around, you can allow the squash mixture to cool, and toss it with the mixed leaves.

    "It's a great first-course salad," Lawson said. And that versatility is important.
    I thought this sounded yummy, being two of my favorite things - squash and blue cheese!

    Here is the link with the complete recipes (the dark chocolate "Mont Blanc" dessert looks fabulous, too).
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...oryId=96288338
    Denise

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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Connor's mom View Post
    I heard an interview with Nigella Lawson this morning on NPR's Morning Edition and pulled this off the NPR website to share (I hope I'm citing this correctly).



    I thought this sounded yummy, being two of my favorite things - squash and blue cheese!

    Here is the link with the complete recipes (the dark chocolate "Mont Blanc" dessert looks fabulous, too).
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...oryId=96288338
    This was such a precious interview. I loved Steve's comment at the end that all the males in the studio were listening intently to Nigella's every word. I concocted a squash/blue cheese/walnut recipe that I posted here a few months ago that was very similar to what Nigella served up. Some of my favorite flavor combinations, to be sure.

    And chestnut puree with chocolate. I could die.

    But to the topic at hand! Yes, if the squash is roasted, I eat the peel SugarNSpice- my DH has the same reaction as yours. So I eat his squash peels as well Fiber is my friend. And same for potato peels- I read somewhere once that the bulk of the nutrients is found in the peel.
    If you are a dreamer, come in. If you are a dreamer, a wisher, a liar, a hoper, a prayer, a magic-bean-buyer. If you're a pretender, come sit by my fire, for we have some flax-golden tales to spin. Come in! Come in! Shel Silverstein, Where the Sidewalk Ends.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by avariell View Post
    I eat it sometimes... I especially enjoy the pieces that get really caramelized when you roast winter squash. It kind of sticks to my teeth in a really pleasant caramely way
    same here.

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