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Thread: Can we talk "injecting" a turkey?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
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    NW Indiana
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    Can we talk "injecting" a turkey?

    I have heard good reviews from people about tukeys that have been injected

    Can anyone give me their experience on this? Does it really make it a better bird? What if I just want to cook a turkey breast?

    What did you use as a "recipe" for the fluid? Can you "roast" the turkey after it is injected or does it have to be deep fried?

    Thanks!
    Julie

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    I started injecting birds when I started deep frying them. With that said, the past couple of years I"ve roasted, but still injected as I really liked how moist and flavorful it's made the bird. In the past, I bought a Tony Chachere's injectable marinade, but will attempt to make my own this year. When I nail down a recipe I'll come back and share it. But I highly recommend injecting, even if you're doing a breast only.
    Terri _A
    I'm anal retentive. I'm a workaholic. I have insomnia. And I'm a control freak. That's why I'm not married. Who could stand me?” -Madonna

    Read my ramblings about food and my nutty life on A Girl in the South!

  3. #3
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    I agree with Terri about when you deep fry the bird it benefits greatly from injection. I just always figured it was a shortcut to brining. At least with injecting you can control the sodium content.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    You can inject turkeys that are going to fried or baked. Butterball turkeys are injected with butter. Here is a video that shows you how to do it. One thing I would be sure to do is tell your guests that you are serving a turkey that has been injected with marinade so that they won't think that something is wrong with the meat when they slice into it (heavy marinades such as cajun, will stain the meat in the area that has been injected).

    There are all kinds of different injection marinades sold on the internet.


  5. #5
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    We've injected our own marinades into a turkey so I think you could inject any kind of marinade you would use on other meats. Sorry I don't have a specific recipe to suggest, but wanted to say that the injection needs to smooth. So, you have to really process it or put it in the blender if you want to add solid things (garlic, onions, etc.). The chunks clog the injector needle.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
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    NW Indiana
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    Thanks for the info so far.

    I am off to research for some recipes.

    Feel free to post them if you have ones to share!

    Thanks again!
    Julie

  7. I agree that you can do it with a turkey breast, because the main reason for injecting a marinade is moisture and flavor. And it is the breast, rather than the legs and thighs that has less fat and therefore, needs more moisture.

    Hope that helps!
    Steph
    Stephanie
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  8. #8
    I inject my Thanksgiving turkeys every year and then deep-fry. I have a recipe for the marinade that I obtained from a co-worker of DH when we lived for a short while in Louisiana. This co-worker was born and raised in Louisiana and was kind enough to teach DH how to inject and deep-fry properly. Once we tasted the deep-fried bird, we always deep-fried from then on. In addition to injecting, we rub the turkeys with the rub recipe below.

    I get rave reviews on my turkeys and every person who has eaten these injected turkeys ends up becoming a deep-fry convert and always uses my marinade recipe. I have tried one other marinade recipe once (I think it was an Emeril recipe) and preferred this one so much more. My turkeys are really tasty, if I do say so myself!

    Here it is (it can be tweaked of course):

    JIMMY'S CAJUN MARINADE FOR DEEP-FRIED TURKEY
    Source: Jimmy from Baton Rouge

    1 16 oz bottle Italian dressing (or make your own)
    1 TBS Liquid Onion Juice
    1 TBS Liquid Garlic Juice
    1 TBS Liquid Smoke
    1 TBS Lemon Juice
    1 TBS White Wine
    1 TBS Lea & Perrins or other brand Worcestershire Sauce
    3 TBS honey

    TURKEY RUB INGREDIENTS:
    1 large bottle hot sauce (the red kind)
    Tony Chachere's Creole Seasoning



    Cooking Instructions for marinade:
    1. Combine all ingredients and mix over low heat in saucepan, in order to combine honey with other ingredients and to drive off vinegar odor from dressing. Strain mixture through small colander or cheese cloth and inject mixture into turkeys while warm.

    AFTER INJECTION:
    1. Rub (massage) inside and outside of turkey with hot sauce and a spice called 'Tony Chachere's Creole Seasoning'-use most or all of the bottle of hot sauce for the two turkeys-be generous (you may want to use plastic or latex gloves for this part). Refrigerate turkeys breast-side down in white plastic kitchen garbage bags overnight. Make sure you remove plastic bags from turkeys prior to deep-frying.


    Kim's Cooking Notes:
    Makes enough marinade for two 15 or 16 lb. turkeys
    Prepare marinade in advance to give flavors time to blend and let sit on stove-then warm it up before injecting turkey.
    Inject turkeys the night before you cook them.

  9. #9
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    When my DB was doing his surgical rotation, he took a big ol' M.D. syringe & injected his meat b4 grilling, b4 injection was "hot" & b4 you could buy injectors everywhere. Worked great! He swore by it about a decade before it was widely done.
    If you're afraid of butter, use cream. ~~ Julia Child

    As you cook, you enjoy omniscience about food that no amount of label reading can match. Having retaken control of the meal from the food scientists, you know exactly what is in it. (Unless you start w/cream of mushroom soup, in which case all bets are off.) To reclaim control over one's food, to take it back from industry & science, is no small thing; indeed, in our time, cooking from scratch qualifies as subversive. ~~ Michael Pollan

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