Community Message Boards
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Tamale question/lard

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    1,534

    Tamale question/lard

    Hi,

    I didn't want to hijack the other tamale thread, so I'll start a new one. This recipe was in our local paper yesterday; I've never embarked on tamales and this looks good. Since I'll be sharing and one of the participants is vegetarian (which is why this recipe looks intriguing as well), can I possibly sub veg shortening for the lard?

    Thanks!

    Kate

    MONTEREY JACK TAMALES

    Start to finish: 4 hours (1 hour active)Makes 16 tamales

    16 corn husks

    1/2 cup lard, refrigerated until firm

    1 pound (about 2 cups) masa for tamales

    2/3 cup chicken broth, room temperature

    1 teaspoon baking powder

    1/2 teaspoon salt

    8 ounces Monterey Jack cheese, cut into 2-by-1/4-inch sticks

    4 chipotle chilies in adobo sauce, minced

    Kitchen twine

    In a large stockpot, separate the corn husks, then add enough water to cover. Heat over medium-high and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove the pot from the heat, then place a plate over the husks to keep them submerged. Soak for 2 hours.

    When you are ready to make the tamales, remove husks from the water and pat them dry.

    In a large bowl, use an electric mixer to beat the lard until light and fluffy, about 1 minute. Add half of the masa, then beat until well blended. Add the remaining masa a bit at a time, alternating with the broth.

    The mixture should have the consistency of thick cake batter. Sprinkle in the baking powder and salt, then beat for 1 minute. Scoop out 1/2 teaspoon of the mixture and drop it in a glass of cold water. If it floats, the dough is ready. If not, continue beating for another minute. Set aside.

    In a small bowl, combine the cheese and chipotle chilies and toss well. Set aside.

    To prepare the steamer, place a steamer basket in a large stockpot filled with several inches of water. Arrange several of the spare corn husks over the bottom of the steamer, being sure to leave gaps for condensation to drip down.

    To form the tamales, one at a time spread each corn husk flat with the tapered end toward you. The husks naturally curl; the curl should be upward toward you. Spread 3 tablespoons of dough into a 4-inch square at the center of each husk.

    Top each square of dough with a bit of the cheese and chipotle chilies.

    To fold the tamale, fold the long sides up over the filling, overlapping slightly. Crease and fold each short end up over the center, one overlapping the other. Use a length of kitchen twine to gently tie each one shut around the center.

    Arrange the tamales on the corn husks in the stockpot, then cover them with additional spare husks. Bring the water to a simmer over medium heat, then cover and steam for 1 1/4 hours. Check the pot regularly to add water as needed.

    The tamales are done when the husks easily peel away from the dough. Uncover the pot and remove it from the heat. Let stand for 10 minutes, then serve. Let guests unwrap their own tamales (don't eat the husks).

    Adapted from Rick Bayless' "Authentic Mexican" (William Morrow, 2007)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    1,534
    PS: to clarify, I'll also be using veggie stock!

    Kate

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    4,104
    I think you can... but it won't taste the same. In my experience, the lard lends a pretty important flavor to tamales. Having said that, if you have never tasted the recipe, it will probably taste good without the lard, kwim?
    - Josie


  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    KS
    Posts
    1,128
    We use olive oil instead of lard or shortening. That would probably impact the consistency of your dough if you tried a one-one substitution, but it will taste yummy
    Once, during prohibition, I was forced to live for days on nothing but food and water. W. C. Fields

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    24,226
    You can use veg shortening or olive oil.

    Found this recipe for vegan tamales that sounds really good! Though I'd probably omit the TVP and add more beans (frijoles rather than whole).
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    1,534
    Thanks everyone! Now I just need to take the tamale-making plunge.

    Kate

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    pacific northwest
    Posts
    746
    I've made the Bittman recipe in HTCEV a couple times now and he recommends using olive oil that you solidify in the freezer for the tamales. It's worked well in his recipe and it should work in the one you posted as well.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    1,534
    I finally took the tamale plunge. Actually, minky (sis) and I made them this weekend. Very tasty and not as hard/time-consuming as I thought they'd be. Definitely a repeater!

    I used half olive oil/half veg shortening and put that mixture in the refrigerator for a while before making. I also used veggie broth. FWIW, 2 cups also doesn't equal one pound; I weighed the masa and one pound was like 4 cups. I added masa until the dough seemed the right consistency, probably around 2 1/2 cups but that's just a guess.

    Kate

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,716
    Quote Originally Posted by sneezles View Post
    You can use veg shortening or olive oil.

    Found this recipe for vegan tamales that sounds really good! Though I'd probably omit the TVP and add more beans (frijoles rather than whole).
    This recipe looks really good, but what exactly is TVP?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    24,226
    Quote Originally Posted by TieKitty View Post
    This recipe looks really good, but what exactly is TVP?

    Textured vegetable protein that is made from soy flour and soy oil. Name's not very appetizing so I think that's why it's usually called tvp.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,716
    Quote Originally Posted by sneezles View Post
    Textured vegetable protein that is made from soy flour and soy oil. Name's not very appetizing so I think that's why it's usually called tvp.
    Hmmm. I was afraid I was asking another silly question, but I've never heard of TVP. You're right. It doesn't sound appetizing at all.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •