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Thread: For how long would you keep cookie dough with raw egg?

  1. #1
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    Question For how long would you keep cookie dough with raw egg?

    That is, keeping it in the fridge, not the freezer. Would you treat it like any raw egg by itself, meaning just a couple of days?
    If you're afraid of butter, use cream. ~~ Julia Child

    As you cook, you enjoy omniscience about food that no amount of label reading can match. Having retaken control of the meal from the food scientists, you know exactly what is in it. (Unless you start w/cream of mushroom soup, in which case all bets are off.) To reclaim control over one's food, to take it back from industry & science, is no small thing; indeed, in our time, cooking from scratch qualifies as subversive. ~~ Michael Pollan

  2. #2
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    This won't really answer your question, because I'm not really recommending it, but let it serve as one of the endpoints (far endpoints) of the various opinions that will chime in.

    A few months ago, during a freezer purge, I defrosted a big hunk of butter cookie dough left over from the previous holidays. I proceeded to make 3 or 4 cookies at a time from it for several weeks, and ate a piece raw with some frequency with no ill effects.

  3. #3
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    Well I know it will be fine for at least 72 hours because that is how long the NY Times chocolate chip cookie recipe WANTS the dough to sit in the fridge before baking.

    Frankly I would keep it longer, although I would also ask why--why not just freeze it? It will save you the hassle/headache of worrying and sniffing.
    -Laura

    Muffins are for people who don't have the 'nads to order cake for breakfast.
    --Seth, "Kitchen Confidential" (the show, not the book)

    www.thespicedlife.com/

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljt2r View Post
    Frankly I would keep it longer, although I would also ask why--why not just freeze it? It will save you the hassle/headache of worrying and sniffing.
    Because--um --it's already not exactly brand-new. I forgot all about it.

    < hanging head in foodie shame at the thought of throwing it away--but we've all been there >
    If you're afraid of butter, use cream. ~~ Julia Child

    As you cook, you enjoy omniscience about food that no amount of label reading can match. Having retaken control of the meal from the food scientists, you know exactly what is in it. (Unless you start w/cream of mushroom soup, in which case all bets are off.) To reclaim control over one's food, to take it back from industry & science, is no small thing; indeed, in our time, cooking from scratch qualifies as subversive. ~~ Michael Pollan

  5. #5
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    FWIW, i have a Refrigerator Bran Muffins recipe with two raw eggs and the batter is good for up to six weeks. i've also mixed up a batch of pancake batter and kept that on hand for a week.

    i'd say you're ok.
    ~ Learn something new every day ~

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by francophila View Post
    FWIW, i have a Refrigerator Bran Muffins recipe with two raw eggs and the batter is good for up to six weeks. i've also mixed up a batch of pancake batter and kept that on hand for a week.

    i'd say you're ok.
    You're probably right--I have a similar muffin recipe.

    Wonder why there's a general worry about storage life for raw eggs then? The Egg Board says 2-4 days, and I can't imagine that something magical happens when they're mixed into other foods, making them last longer. Same concern for preassembled casseroles with raw egg. Thoughts?
    If you're afraid of butter, use cream. ~~ Julia Child

    As you cook, you enjoy omniscience about food that no amount of label reading can match. Having retaken control of the meal from the food scientists, you know exactly what is in it. (Unless you start w/cream of mushroom soup, in which case all bets are off.) To reclaim control over one's food, to take it back from industry & science, is no small thing; indeed, in our time, cooking from scratch qualifies as subversive. ~~ Michael Pollan

  7. #7
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    I keep egg whites for a heck of a lot longer than 2 days!

    It's just the food police as far as I am concerned. I'd rather live slightly on the edge (and it is only slight in my opinion) and not waste so much food.

    And, FWIW, I forget stuff in the back of my fridge all the time.
    -Laura

    Muffins are for people who don't have the 'nads to order cake for breakfast.
    --Seth, "Kitchen Confidential" (the show, not the book)

    www.thespicedlife.com/

  8. #8
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    And about ice-cream custards . . .

    This ties in with the thread I started (so the hijack's OK ) about how long to keep a cooked ice-cream custard b4 churning it. I wondered if I could keep it all week & churn it this weekend, versus churning it now (meaning the ice cream might not be the best quality by this weekend), or even freezing the unchurned custard all week & defrosting/churning this weekend.

    Thoughts, anyone, on this related egg-storage topic (custards)?

    I think I'll take my chances with the cookie dough, & bake it up tomorrow if it seems OK. I bet our grandmothers weren't so worried about eggs--sure, the egg-producing practices now aren't the same as in the old days, but the dough is probably fine (& will be cooked anyway).
    If you're afraid of butter, use cream. ~~ Julia Child

    As you cook, you enjoy omniscience about food that no amount of label reading can match. Having retaken control of the meal from the food scientists, you know exactly what is in it. (Unless you start w/cream of mushroom soup, in which case all bets are off.) To reclaim control over one's food, to take it back from industry & science, is no small thing; indeed, in our time, cooking from scratch qualifies as subversive. ~~ Michael Pollan

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