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Thread: Half-sheet (jellyroll) pans turning black in dishwasher.

  1. #1
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    Question Half-sheet (jellyroll) pans turning black in dishwasher.

    I bought some so-called restaurant-quality half-sheet pans (world-record # of hyphens in one sentence ) at Sam's, and they discolored in the d/w but not too badly. I bought another set, & they turned black, as if covered with soot! They did not say "hand wash only," and I can't imagine any restaurant (or busy home kitchen) hand-washing such a workhorse pan. What kind do you have, where'd you get them, and how do you wash them?

    I talked to KA and checked W-S, and the pans everywhere seem pretty much the same: heavy aluminum (shiny), and "will discolor with use." Not "will look like they've been through a house fire." I have a set of nonstick heavy-duty pans that I love; they've been thru the d/w countless times and I think they're Chicago Metallic but curiously, there's no name on the bottom. Would love to buy more & forget all about the shiny ones. Sam's price is 2 for $10 for their shiny aluminum pans, which is hard to beat when just one pan from other sources costs $16-$20. I wanted several shiny pans for all sorts of miscellaneous uses, and I didn't care if they discolored a little bit in the d/w, but an allover grey (and some of it rubs off on my finger ) is gross. I also wonder about the wisdom of cooking on non-anodized aluminum, for health reasons (as the nonstick ones won't get higher than the oven temp, so I'm not concerned about the coating in that case b/c it won't be superheated).

    Thanks for any info/comments!
    If you're afraid of butter, use cream. ~~ Julia Child

    As you cook, you enjoy omniscience about food that no amount of label reading can match. Having retaken control of the meal from the food scientists, you know exactly what is in it. (Unless you start w/cream of mushroom soup, in which case all bets are off.) To reclaim control over one's food, to take it back from industry & science, is no small thing; indeed, in our time, cooking from scratch qualifies as subversive. ~~ Michael Pollan

  2. #2
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    While commercial kitchens certainly don't wash most things by hand the cycle is much shorter cause the water is hotter (ours didn't have a drying cycle either but that was a PITA when you needed the pan NOW!). I, personally, don't put my pans in the DW and while they've discolored a bit (10 years old) if I was to take an SOS pad to them they'd probably shine right up...not gonna happen. Mine are Chicago Metallic and I don't really remember where I bought them.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  3. #3
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    Aluminum is generally not considered dishwasher safe. It reacts with the alkalinity of home dishwasher detergent (these are alkaline to remove fat/oil.) There's a thin native oxide on bare aluminum, but it's not thick enough to be a protective layer.

    I don't think restaurants put their sheet pans in the dishwasher. Usually there's a person whose job it is to scrub the pots and pans. The few commercial dishwashers I've seen were set up for plates, glassware, and flatware only.

    I hand wash all my aluminum baking equipment and use parchment or a Silpat when baking.

    Michelle

  4. #4
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    In every kitchen I've worked in all sheet pans were washed by hand. I also wash all sheet pans/jelly roll pans by hand at home.
    Last edited by Jessnc; 02-19-2009 at 10:49 AM. Reason: grammar

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    Huh. Thanks for the answers! They're an eye-opener. I assumed that professional kitchens would put everything into the d/w.

    Now, does anyone have an answer for this one? If they're not supposed to go into the d/w, then why do W-S and SLT say theirs are d/w safe? My guess is that the higher grade of pan sold by those stores (Chicago Metallic) will discolor but do nothing more, but the crummy grade (possibly? , but it seemed OK) sold by Sam's will fully blacken and get sooty in the d/w. Maybe--??

    (New screen name: testpans45. )
    If you're afraid of butter, use cream. ~~ Julia Child

    As you cook, you enjoy omniscience about food that no amount of label reading can match. Having retaken control of the meal from the food scientists, you know exactly what is in it. (Unless you start w/cream of mushroom soup, in which case all bets are off.) To reclaim control over one's food, to take it back from industry & science, is no small thing; indeed, in our time, cooking from scratch qualifies as subversive. ~~ Michael Pollan

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    So not to come in and make it a controversy but I have always put the pans you are describing into the DW to no ill effect. At least I would guess they were the same--I got mine at wal-mart and I also have 2 from Williams Sonomamn (actually just 1 now, we killed one, not the DW and it was our fault and not worth trying to clean). they are not non stick and are aluminum and shiny. I do however try to make sure they don't have anything except grease on them when they go through bc stuff like sugar will adhere in the heat dry cycle and then I pull out the steel wool.

    I have never heard of having to baby aluminum pans! Am curious to see if I am alone....
    -Laura

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    Quote Originally Posted by ljt2r View Post
    I have never heard of having to baby aluminum pans! Am curious to see if I am alone....
    Jumping back in here b/c I'm on hold with the Dept. of Public Safety to ask teen-driving questions, and I'm bored out of my gourd . . .

    . . . but it occurred to me to wonder, why in the heck should any of us baby aluminum pans b/c of d/w detergent, when my Lenox bone china can go into the d/w with no ill effects!!! And that's per Lenox: use no drying heat, use a liquid detergent, & you're good to go.

    I've run several of my older Sam's pans thru the d/w with only minor discoloration; not sure why this latest set turned soot-black. The pans are from two manufacturers, but that hasn't made a diff; I now have soot from each mfr. I would think they'd either all be black, or all be merely discolored.
    If you're afraid of butter, use cream. ~~ Julia Child

    As you cook, you enjoy omniscience about food that no amount of label reading can match. Having retaken control of the meal from the food scientists, you know exactly what is in it. (Unless you start w/cream of mushroom soup, in which case all bets are off.) To reclaim control over one's food, to take it back from industry & science, is no small thing; indeed, in our time, cooking from scratch qualifies as subversive. ~~ Michael Pollan

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    Quote Originally Posted by testkitchen45 View Post
    Now, does anyone have an answer for this one? If they're not supposed to go into the d/w, then why do W-S and SLT say theirs are d/w safe?

    Simple answer: Marketing!
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  9. #9
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    I put mine in the d/w. They are a little discolored and sometimes seem to leave a strange metallic marking on my counter. I use parchment or silpats when I bake so I don't really care if they stay nice - not very helpful, but that's how it works for me
    - Josie


  10. #10
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    I have a half sheet jelly roll pan that did not discolor, but every time I wash it, it makes the foam and the sponge turn gray. I do not have a dishwasher.

    Also, if I dry it with a kitchen towel, it leaves gray marks on the towel. I try to be in denial about it, but more often than not, I put a sheet of parchment paper on when I bake.

    So considering this happens without dishwashing, anyone have any ideas why mine do this?

  11. #11
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    Angelina - that grey stuff is the same junk that marks up my counter. I swear it must be like some form of oxidization or something... it is pretty weird.
    - Josie


  12. #12
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    Yeah I get it too--more on my towels. Like Josie said though I would say 9/10 times my pans are covered so I don't care much.
    -Laura

    Muffins are for people who don't have the 'nads to order cake for breakfast.
    --Seth, "Kitchen Confidential" (the show, not the book)

    www.thespicedlife.com/

  13. #13
    I love your comment about your pans looking as though they had been through a house fire! That's exactly the way I described it to my wife when I pulled my brand new angel-food cake pan out of the dishwasher for the first time.

    I've always washed my bakeware in the D/W with perhaps some *slight* discoloration, but nothing like this, ever before!

    It must be the Cascade Complete.

  14. #14
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    I'd guess it has something to do with water quality or detergent. We have really hard water, and when I use my workhorse half-sheet ban as a water bath for creme brulee, it leaves the pattern of the ramekins on the bottom of the pan.

    I buy my half-sheet pans at a restaurant supply store, and I've never washed them in the dishwasher. I'd have to wait too long to use them again, and I use at least one of them them at practically every meal.
    I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it hard to plan the day. ~E.B. White

  15. #15
    I never put aluminum bakeware in the dishwasher, or leave it soaking in soapy water for more than a few minutes. Either can cause discoloration. I don't think it matters whether the aluminum is thick or thin.

    I love my aluminum baking pans. They do the best job of baking. But they do take gentle care.

    (Just because a retailer says something is dishwasher safe doesn't mean it's a good idea to use the dishwasher. I find that dishwasher detergents are extremely harsh. When in doubt, I don't use the dishwasher.)

  16. #16
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    I happened to see this online tonight:

    http://5 Things You Should Never Put in a Dishwasher

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cafe Latte View Post
    I happened to see this online tonight:

    http://5 Things You Should Never Put in a Dishwasher
    hey, i tried to access this and got a message that the link was broken, FYI--

  18. #18

    Aluminum pans

    I have had the same 4 commercial aluminum pans for over 15 years and never had any discoloration problems (using the d/w) until this past summer. Both of my small pans are 'smoked up' now but for some reason the large ones have not. I also have several thinner, cheaper pans that have held up until this summer as well. I had an incident in May with the d/w and ever since then they are all dark now (except the 2 large ones,,,go figure). I don't wash the larges ones as often in the d/w only bc they are so big and can only go in one certain spot. I had a clogged sink in May and a friend we know came in and used 'Liquid Fire' to (try to) get the clog out and some of it went up into the d/w. From that time on by pans have turned dark. We had to get a new d/w after a few months from the damage the LF caused. (Lesson learned.)

  19. #19
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    I also use commercial aluminum half-sheet pans and always hand-wash them. Mine would not fit in my dishwasher anyway! I do line them with a silpat or parchment most of the time, but handwashing takes only a minute and I use some Barkeeper's Friend on them to keep them looking fairly good. We never put them in the dishwasher at the cooking school where I volunteer, either.
    Lynne


    To err is human, to forgive, canine.
    -- Anonymous

  20. #20

    Half-sheet (jellyroll) pans turning black in dishwasher.

    Look at the kind of dishwasher soap you use. I always used Cascade liquid without harming my tin pans. Then a friend convinced me to try the Cascade 3 in 1 packets and now my favorite baking pan I use for cornbread is black and turns the towel black when I dried it. I'm looking for a way to clean it. At least enough so the black doesn't come off in the food like it's coming off on the towel. This is a very old pan, like 50+ years old and was a joy to work with. I hate to see it go. But if I don't get it clean enough then it becomes a planter for my cat's cat grass that he hasn't had in a long time.

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