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Thread: Adobo sauce in a jar?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Adobo sauce in a jar?

    Frequently recipes call for a teaspoon or two of Adobo sauce from the can of chipotle chiles. There's only so much sauce to a can! Yesterday at the market I saw a jar of Adobo sauce. It said "Mexican Condiment" underneath it and showed it spread across a chicken breast. The shelf tag under the jar said "Mole Adobo" but the jar didn't say Mole.

    Wondering if this is the same stuff? Or is it just an adobo-flavored mole sauce? I know I would use the Adobo sauce more if I had a jar of the stuff in the fridge, but I wasn't going to spend $4 for that jar to find out until I asked the experts!
    ~ "The right shoe can change your life...."- Cinderella ~

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Jewel View Post
    Frequently recipes call for a teaspoon or two of Adobo sauce from the can of chipotle chiles. There's only so much sauce to a can! Yesterday at the market I saw a jar of Adobo sauce. It said "Mexican Condiment" underneath it and showed it spread across a chicken breast. The shelf tag under the jar said "Mole Adobo" but the jar didn't say Mole.

    Wondering if this is the same stuff? Or is it just an adobo-flavored mole sauce? I know I would use the Adobo sauce more if I had a jar of the stuff in the fridge, but I wasn't going to spend $4 for that jar to find out until I asked the experts!
    Howdy Jewel,

    We have witnessed the same tragedy on the grocery store shelves and you are not the only one confused by this. I believe you are speaking of the "Dona Maria Adobo Mexican Condiment".

    Not Mole nor is this one called Mole ;


    Nope, this is not Mole. The ingredients consist of Soybean Oil, Chile Peppers, Crackers, Sesame Seeds, Peanuts, Sugar, Salt, and the age old con "natural flavors" whatever that is supposed to mean.

    So you are correct, this is an "an adobo-flavored mole sauce". It's a fake based on cheap oil.

    If you are concerned about stretching that single can of chipotles and sauce, here is what I do with one of those...

    Chipotle chiles (smoked jalapeno chiles) are most often canned in a red sauce that typically contains tomato puree, paprika, salt, onions, oil, vinegar, garlic, bay leaves (some of the time) and oregano. Aside from going to the extreme and making (smoking) my own, I use these as well. Normally I use all of the chiles in cooking for myself (as I am a leather-throated chile hound), yet there are times when just the sauce is needed. So what I do is take one can, drop it in the food processor, add the juice of one fresh squeezed lime, a few tablespoons of olive oil and a cup of water, and stick blend for just a bit. I then put that in a jar and have used it for up to a month or so.

    I've also cheated and added crushed red chile peppers (and even bell pepper) in the past. Before blending... A little dabble of kosher salt won't kill it either...

    Hope that helps.


    FTVF

  3. #3
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    Another option is to simply purée your entire can of chipotles in adobo; that way you can use it in very small quantities if wanted, or use a teaspoon or two for every "one chipotle" called for in a recipe. I find it easier to use that way myself.
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  4. #4
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    Thanks to the both of you! And yes, that was the brand I saw on the shelf. Saw the ingredients, but also didn't know what the Adobo sauce IN the chipotle can was made from, so I had no way of comparing!

    My only issue with pureeing the can is that I'm a wimp about the seeds. I usually split and scrape all membrane and seeds from the pepper and then mince. I guess I could do that with the whole can before pureeing!

    I honestly just thought that the Adobo sauce itself was unique and different and wanted just that sauce sometimes, and didn't want to have to open/stretch a can of chiles to get it! Thanks for setting me straight on the fake stuff!
    ~ "The right shoe can change your life...."- Cinderella ~

  5. #5
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    Is your issue with the seeds heat or texture?
    If it's heat, it doesn't matter because you simply use less of the purée; if it's texture, they seem to get pulverized in the processor. But if it's just that you prefer the adobo sauce, it's not a solution.
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
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    San Ramon, CA
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    I was out of chipotle in adobo sauce the other day and went to foodsubs.com to see what I could do. They suggested 1tbsp ketchup, 1/2 tsp liquid smoke, and 1 jalapeno pepper (I used a serrano since that is what I had). Worked pretty well! So if you just want the sauce it would be the ketchup/liquid smoke combo
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