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Thread: Have 4 Gala Apples, would like to make applesauce, do I just....

  1. #1

    Have 4 Gala Apples, would like to make applesauce, do I just....

    I have 4 Gala apples and I would like to make some applesauce. I've never made it before. Do I just peel, chop, toss in pan, throw in some water so it won't stick and ......

    I am not sure how much liquid to add, how long I should cook, and at what temp. Do I need to peel (don't care about the color)? Does it just cook down I don't really need to mash further, maybe just with a fork? Not sure if it would need sugar.

    Any suggestions would be great.

    Many thanks,

  2. #2
    According to Deborah Madison, the queen of vegetarian cooking:

    You don't need to peel them if you are using a food mill. If you aren't using one, peel.
    She says for 3 lbs of apples, quartered, use 1/3 cup water.
    Cook, covered, at a simmer for 20 minutes, or until tender.
    Taste and adjust for sweetness/tartness. If too tart stir in some honey or sugar. If too sweet stir in some lemon juice.
    Add any spices you might like, cinnamon is a good one, and simmer another 5 minutes.
    I just use my good ol' potato masher to mash the apples right in the pan I've cooked them in. I like my applesauce a little chunky so the masher is perfect for that.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    If you have a food mill, you don't have to peel. I don't, and I don't want peel in the final product, so I peel before cooking. So, I core, dice and put in a saucepan with really just enough water to film the bottom, and a pinch of salt. I use Granny Smiths so I usually add some sugar -- I'd use about a Tbsp for 4 apples. If I have a lemon around I might throw in a squeeze of juice or a chunk of rind, but I don't want an overwhelming lemony flavor. You can also add a whole clove, a sprinkle of cinnamon, etc. but I like mine plain. Cover and cook until done -- shouldn't take more than 15 minutes. I use a potato masher to puree, I don't mind it a little chunky.
    The Blog is open again!
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  4. #4
    Thank you both. My first batch of applesauce is simmering on the stove as I type this.

    I love homemade applesauce, the bottled stuff doesn't even come close. Looking forward to trying it.

    Thanks again.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    I would sub in apple cider for the water if you have it in the fridge - I think it enhances the flavor nicely.
    - Josie


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    I was going to say the same thing ... cider or apple juice instead of water. No need for sugar.

  7. #7
    The applesauce is cooling. It tasted pretty good warm. The apples didn't have super taste to begin with so next time I go to my farmers market, I will definitely pick up some different apples (not a big fan of Galas) and make another batch.

    Since I only had a few apples, it didn't make that much --- but just wondering how long it would keep in the refrigerator, if I made a big batch. I recall reading on the BB that some freeze leftovers.

    Great tip about using apple cider/juice.

    Thanks again everyone.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    My info all says you can refrigerate up to 2 weeks and freeze up to 6 mos.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Nebraska
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    I just cooked down a half bushel and did up in individual packages and froze them...I did the same last year and ended up eating the last package a couple of weeks ago.

    I don't do anything fancy...I just put in zip lock bags and then zip shut and put in a larger gallon size zip lock and freeze the whole package.
    EmptyNestMom
    Grandma Pam to 3


    “Other creatures receive food simply as fodder. But we take the raw materials of the earth and work with them—touch them, manipulate them, taste them, glory in their heady smells and colors, and then, through a bit of alchemy, transform them into delicious creations.”
    ― Judith Jones, The Tenth Muse: My Life in Food

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