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Thread: Sunday Cooking Game of the Week #178 10-11-09

  1. #1
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    Sunday Cooking Game of the Week #178 10-11-09

    Good Morning Everyone!!!!!!


    This weeks suggested number is #12

    The category for the week is ITALIAN FOOD - Monday is Columbus Day.


    HOW TO PLAY SUNDAY COOKING GAME OF THE WEEK (Revised 05-10-09)

    A number will be suggested that corresponds to your cookbooks.

    A category will be drawn from the hat, recipe can be from any source except CLBB .

    Choose either number or category or both.

    Make a new recipe (to you)

    If you use the number, please tell us something about that book.

    Please post recipe (no links) and review before the next game starts.

    Sunday Game of the Week is open to anyone that would like to play.

    You are all welcome

    Happy Cooking!!

  2. #2
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    Just a heads up for those that work outside of the home. This Friday, the 16th is "National Boss Day".

    Also, it is that time again. Next week will be "Pantry Cleanout".

    For the newbies, here is how it goes. This week, submit on this weeks game, a list of 5 ingredients in your pantry that you would like to use up. This time we are also including herbs and spices. At the beginning of next weeks game, I will pick from your list and give you your item for the week. Easy as that.

  3. #3
    Looks like I'll be busting out The Silver Spoon this week. I got it for Christmas last year, and it claims to be the "bible of authentic Italian cooking." I've only made one thing from it so far, because trying to pick something from over 2,000 recipes is slightly intimidating.
    As far as pantry cleanout goes, my 5 items are tahini paste, achiote, capers, pickled jalapenos, and duck sauce.

  4. #4
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    Wow!! That was fast. Thanks Wulvereen7. Got them. Oh, I am still drooling over your recipe that you just posted in last weeks game.

  5. #5
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    I'll see if I can play this week...Italian is DH's fave so I'd probably go with that.

    Happy Columbus Day! I wonder if ole Christopher was a big shopper?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by cookieee View Post
    Wow!! That was fast. Thanks Wulvereen7. Got them. Oh, I am still drooling over your recipe that you just posted in last weeks game.
    Yea, there's a pretty strong correlation between the amount of work I have to do and how willing I am to procrastinate/be distracted by other things (ie, food).

  7. #7
    I went with Italian this week. A friend gave me a couple of nice ribeye steaks and I was thinking of some sort of Italian steak recipe. Well, I found a really tasty one here. Easy to make, but does dirty a few pans. DS was over and this one got 6 thumbs up.

    Grilled Italian Skirt Steak

    Ingredients
    •12 oz skirt or flank steak (I used ribeye)
    •1 can (15.5 oz) cannellini beans
    •1 large red onion, sliced
    •2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
    •1 tbsp olive oil
    •1 tbsp fresh chopped rosemary (or 1 tsp dried)
    •2 cloves garlic, minced
    •Juice of 1/2 lemon
    •Salt and pepper to taste

    Directions
    1.In a medium pan over medium heat, cook the onion in half of the olive oil for 10 minutes, until it's soft and slightly brown. Add the vinegar and cook another 5 minutes.
    2.Heat a pot with the remaining olive oil over medium heat. Add the garlic, beans, and rosemary and cook for 5 minutes. Use a potato masher or a fork to roughly mash the beans. Add lemon juice and salt and pepper to taste.
    3.Heat a grill, grill pan, or cast-iron skillet over high heat. Season the steak with salt and pepper and grill for 3 to 4 minutes per side for medium rare. Slice and serve over the beans, and spoon the onions on top.
    4.(from Men's Health, Jan/Feb '08)



    I also used my The New Regional Italian Cookbook for a salad recipe to go with the steak. Very tasty, although a bit heavy on the onions. So, it was a red onion dinner. LOL. Although the red onions in the steak dish were very mild due to being caramelized.

    Pomodori e Cipolle
    Tomato and Onion Salad

    1/4 cup red wine vinegar
    1/2 tbsp sugar
    2 red onions
    3 medium firm, ripe tomatoes
    1/2 bunch basil
    2 tbsp non-pariel capers (preferably preserved in salt)
    1/4 cup olive oil
    Salt and freshly ground pepper

    Heat vinegar and sugar in a small saucepan. Cook over high heat for about 4 minutes or until the mixture has thickened and reduced; set aside to cool.

    Peel and slice the onions. Core the tomatoes and cut into wedges. Rinse and pat dry the basil; cut the leaves into thin strips.

    Rinse the capers. Mix the vinegar reduction with the olive oil; season with salt and pepper.

    Toss the tomatoes, basil and onions with the vinegar-oil dressing, serve, sprinkled with the capers.



    Cookieee, I'll work on my pantry list for you.

  8. #8
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    That's too funny. I don't know which is worse. Calling viewers lurkers or gawkers. Thanks for the link Ham, I printed out the Sauerbraten Sour Roast recipe. Sounds real good. Might come in handy in a couple of weeks.

  9. #9
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    I made the dip recipe from last week tonight and it worked with the Italian theme!! Tonights dinner was from Genoa- perfect for your theme cookieee!!

    Linguine with Pesto, Potatoes, and Green Beans
    The Mediterranean Vegan Kitchen

    There is a great pic of this dish and a non-vegan recipe in the Silver Spoon opposite page 290

    This Ligurian dish is a specialty of Genoa, where heady pesto has been infusing pasta, potatoes, and green beans with basil and garlic for centuries. Orginally a peasant dish, cheese was typically added when available and just as typically omitted when not. In either case, tossed with the garlicky Poor Man's Pesto, it simply isn't necessary here. Although the skins of red potatoes contrast nicely with the green pigment of the beans, any type of boiling potatoe can be used. If they're much larger than two inches in diameter, quarter them. (I made thin batons as described in the Silver Spoon.)

    Makes 5 or 6 main-course or 8 pasta-course servings
    (I thought it made 4 main course servings if served along side a salad and bread.)

    8 ounces small new potatoes (about 1 1/2 inches in diameter), preferably red skinned, halved
    4 ounces large green beans, trimmed
    12 ounces dry linguine
    2/3 cup Poor Man's Pesto- following

    Bring a large stock pot filled with salted water to a boil over hight heat. Add the potatoes and gren beans. When the water returns to a boil, reduce the heat to medium-high and boil gently for 3 minutes. Add the pasta and return the heat to high. When the water returns to a boil, reduce the heat slightly and boil gently until the pasta is al dente, 8 to 10 minutes. Reserve 1/2 cup of the cooking liquid, then drain the pasta and vegetables in a colander.

    Transfer the pasta and vegetables to a large shallow serving bowl. Add the pesto and the reserved cooking liquid; toss well to combine. Serve at once.


    Variation

    Pesto, Potatoes, and Green Beans

    To creat a delicious vegetable side dish to serve six, omit the pasta altogether and reduce the pesto to 1/2 cup. Increase the amount of potatoes to 1 1/2 poinds and the green beans to 3/4 pound. Boil them gently in a large stockpot of salted water until the potatoes are cooked through but not mushy and the beans are tender, 10-12 minutes. Drain, reserving about 3 tablespoons of the cooking liquid. Toss with the pesto and reserved cooking liquid. Serve at once.


    Poor Man's Pesto

    makes about 1 cup

    3 cups loosely packed fresh basil leaves
    6 tablespoons pine nuts
    2 to 4 large cloves galic
    3/4 teaspoon coarse salt, or to taste
    6 tablespoons fruity extra-virgin olive oil

    Combine the basil, pine nuts, garlic, and salt in a food processor fitted with the metal blade or in a blender. Process or blend until the ingredients are finely chopped, scraping down the sides of the work bowl as necessary. Add the oil and process until smooth and creamy. If not using immediately, store tightly covered in the refrigerator for up to 2 days, or place in ice cube trays, cover tightly with plastic wrap, and store in the freezer no longer than 1 month for the best flavor.
    Cheryl

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by cherylopal View Post
    I made the dip recipe from last week tonight and it worked with the Italian theme!! Tonights dinner was from Genoa- perfect for your theme cookieee!!
    Your right Cheryl, perfect for the game. I looked at all of my Italian recipes and none of them are from Genoa.

  11. #11
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    DH has been wanting us to make this for YEARS So today is the day. This is from one of my favorite cooks on TV, "The Frugal Gourmet". I sure do miss him.

    RAGU

    Makes about 3 quarts

    "Ragu is a simple sauce made almost entirely with meat, and it is common throughout the Emilia-Romagna region-well, all of Northern Italy for that matter. There are as many recipes for this dish as there are grandmas in the area. Tambaurini, one of the finest food stores in Bologna, makes something like the following. However, in a very famous restaurant in Parma, the chef uses little else than veal and butter. So enjoy, but this dish makes anything on which you put it into an entire meal."

    1/2 cup olive oil
    6 cloves garlic, finely chopped
    1 rib celery, finely chopped
    1 medium carrot, peeled and finely chopped
    1 medium yellow onion, finely chopped
    1/2 lb pancetta finely chopped
    2 lbs veal, coarsely ground
    2 lbs pork butt, coarsely ground
    1/4 cup chopped parsley
    2 1/2 cups chicken stock
    1/2 cup dry white wine
    1 6 oz can tomato paste
    6 TB butter
    1/4 cup whipping cream
    2 tsp chopped fresh sage
    2/3 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
    Salt and pepper to taste

    Heat a 10 to 12 quart heavy-bottom stainless-steel kettle, and add the oil, garlic, celery, carrot, and onion. Saute until the onion is transparent, about 10 to 15 minutes. Add the pancetta and saute 5 minutes. Add the veal and pork and brown until crumbly, about 5 minutes. Add the parsley, chicken stock, white wine, and tomato paste. Bring to a boil and simmer gently, partly covered, for 2 hours. Add the butter, cream, sage, and cheese and simmer gently for 5 minutes. Skim the fat from the top of the sauce. Salt and pepper to taste.

    Source: The Frugal Gourmet Cooks Italian - Jeff Smith 1993

    It is cooking now, will get back to you later with the results.

    It's later To quote DH, "it's delicious, worth waiting for". We served it over corkscrew pasta.
    Last edited by cookieee; 10-14-2009 at 09:59 AM.

  12. #12
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    IF anyone makes the Frugs Ragu recipe, I just wanted to let you know that he has 6 recipes in his book that calls for using the Ragu. Happy to supply a recipe if anyone wants one. It really does make 3 quarts.

    Cannelloni Stuffed with Ragu
    Ignudi al Ragu (spinach and ricotta cheese filling for ravioli and dumplings.)
    Maccheroni alla Chitarra Ragu (home made pasta, square shaped)
    Pappardelle Ragu Da Bruno (Da Bruno, restaurant in Milan)
    Pasta with Ragu and Shrimp
    Polenta Lasagna

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by cookieee View Post
    This is from one of my favorite cooks on TV, "The Frugal Gourmet". I sure do miss him.
    He did the first cooking show that I watched on a regular basis and actually learned a few things and cooked a few things.
    Cheryl

  14. #14
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    pantry items

    bulgar- for tabouleh that i never did get around to making
    kalijira rice- bought to play with when i got my rice cooker but haven't played with it yet
    wheat berries
    rg's florida butter beans- meant to make a family recipe when tomatoes were in season but never got around to making beans from scratch
    kamut- just beause i saw it and wanted to play
    Cheryl

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by cherylopal View Post
    pantry items

    bulgar- for tabouleh that i never did get around to making
    kalijira rice- bought to play with when i got my rice cooker but haven't played with it yet
    wheat berries
    rg's florida butter beans- meant to make a family recipe when tomatoes were in season but never got around to making beans from scratch
    kamut- just beause i saw it and wanted to play
    Hi Cheryl, I forgot to mention in my review, I played the tape of him making the Ragu on his tv show. I am so glad I taped as many as I did. Now I just have to learn how to transfer them all to DVD's

    Thank you for your list. Will you tell me what the heck Kamut is or are you going to make me look it up?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by cookieee View Post
    Will you tell me what the heck Kamut is or are you going to make me look it up?
    Its some kind of grain- I bought it to play. Actually tried it today- Whole Foods had some in their salad bar. Tasted like a grain- not a strong flavor that I noticed. I've seen a few recipes for it...

    from
    http://www.foodsubs.com/GrainKamut.html

    kamut® brand wheat Notes: This ancient grain is related to durum wheat, and was reintroduced to the world after an American found some kernels of it in an Egyptian tomb. It's high in protein and has a sweet, buttery flavor. Though it contains gluten, it's tolerated by many people with gluten allergies. Substitutes: spelt OR wheat
    Cheryl

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by cherylopal View Post
    Its some kind of grain- I bought it to play. Actually tried it today- Whole Foods had some in their salad bar. Tasted like a grain- not a strong flavor that I noticed. I've seen a few recipes for it...

    from
    http://www.foodsubs.com/GrainKamut.html

    kamut® brand wheat Notes: This ancient grain is related to durum wheat, and was reintroduced to the world after an American found some kernels of it in an Egyptian tomb. It's high in protein and has a sweet, buttery flavor. Though it contains gluten, it's tolerated by many people with gluten allergies. Substitutes: spelt OR wheat
    Oh! OK! Thanks!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by cookieee View Post
    Just a heads up for those that work outside of the home. This Friday, the 16th is "National Boss Day".

    Also, it is that time again. Next week will be "Pantry Cleanout".

    For the newbies, here is how it goes. This week, submit on this weeks game, a list of 5 ingredients in your pantry that you would like to use up. This time we are also including herbs and spices. At the beginning of next weeks game, I will pick from your list and give you your item for the week. Easy as that.
    Hi, I need a volunteer please, for someone to pick out my pantry item. Will supply my list soon. Tomorrow is the last day for those that haven't submitted their list. It can have items from your last list if they are still in your pantry. I know my list will Just can't seem to get rid of some of that stuff.

  19. #19
    I'll be glad to volunteer to pick your ingredient, cookieee. I'll be a bachelor most of next week so it'll be good to have something else to do.

    My ingredient list so far:
    Spam (I know, I know. We sort of "inherited" it.)
    Evaporated milk
    Can tuna

    That's it so far. Not too much. Hmm.

  20. #20
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    I'll post my recipe soon...

    Pantry items
    coconut milk
    artichoke hearts
    'tube' polenta
    quinoa
    whitewheat flour
    Kay
    I'm a WYSIWYG person -- no subterfuge here!

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammster View Post
    I'll be glad to volunteer to pick your ingredient, cookieee. I'll be a bachelor most of next week so it'll be good to have something else to do.

    My ingredient list so far:
    Spam (I know, I know. We sort of "inherited" it.)
    Evaporated milk
    Can tuna

    That's it so far. Not too much. Hmm.
    Thanks Ham, I appreciate it. Will get my list together soon.

    I "inherit" Spam all the time. One of our basics we keep in the house during hurricane season. At least DH tries to. I keep eating it. I like to cube it and put it in pasta salad and also coat the slices in panko and pan fry. What can I tell you. I also enjoy scrapple

    Don't you have any real "weird" stuff in your pantry?

  22. #22
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    Ham, here is my list. Three of the items are left over from last Pantry cleanout.


    Thai Kitchen Green Curry Paste
    Roland Spicy Black Bean Sauce
    A.1. Steak Sauce Smoky Mesquite
    Mini Fillo Shells
    Lemon Curd (8 oz.)

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by LakeMartinGal View Post
    I'll post my recipe soon...

    Pantry items
    coconut milk
    artichoke hearts
    'tube' polenta
    quinoa
    whitewheat flour
    Thanks Kay, got them

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by cookieee View Post
    This week, submit on this weeks game, a list of 5 ingredients in your pantry that you would like to use up...
    Quote Originally Posted by cookieee View Post
    Don't you have any real "weird" stuff in your pantry?
    I do, but not anything that I want to use up.

    Although here are a couple more things.

    Soba noodles and dried shiitake mushrooms.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammster View Post
    I do, but not anything that I want to use up.

    Although here are a couple more things.

    Soba noodles and dried shiitake mushrooms.
    Thank you Ham, that's more like it.

  26. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by cookieee View Post
    Thank you Ham, that's more like it.
    And that's not even the weird stuff.

  27. #27
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    Hi All......well I didn't go Italian...well I did but I made an old recipe that I hauled out from a 1984 Southern Living...just cos I suddenly remembered it and wanted to try it again...a quick and thick meat sauce that we served over penne. Mmmmm...and nice *eat* down memory lane (from when I had kiddies at home).

    So to my game recipe. Uh, I bought a new (okay 4 new) cookbook this week...from the editors of Fine Cooking Magazine. I wanted to make a soup for a chilly evening (finally out of the 90s!). I'll be back later with results.

    Chicken & Tortilla Soup

    Cooking New American (200 recipes from Fine Cooking magazine)

    Serves 2 as a light main course or substantial first course

    Be sure the broth is very hot so that it heats up the ingredients in the bowl and offers a strong contrast with the cool, smooth chunks of avocado. This recipe is easily doubled.

    1 Tbs vegetable or olive oil plus another ½ to 1 cup for frying the tortillas
    ¼ c finely chopped onion
    1 Tbs chile powder; more to taste
    1 Tbs tomato paste
    2 skinless chicken thighs (bone in or boneless)
    Salt
    4 c homemade or low-salt canned chicken broth
    Fresh cilantro; six 2-inch stems for the broth, plus ¼ c roughly chopped leaves for the garnish
    4 fresh corn tortillas, 6 inches across, cut into ¼-inch-wide strips
    ½ c corn kernels (fresh, frozen or canned)
    ½ c canned black beans, rinsed and drained
    ¼ c diced fresh tomato

    For the garnish:
    1 ripe avocado, diced and tossed with a squeeze of lime juice
    ¼ c crumbled queso fresco, feta or ricotta salata
    2 dollops sour cream
    Lime wedges for serving

    Put 1 tbs of the oil in a large pan or small soup pot; add the onion and cook over medium heat until the onion has softened but not browned, about 3 minutes. Add the chile powder and tomato paste and stir with a wooden spoon to mix and cook briefly; take care not to let the chile powder scorch.

    Season the chicken thighs lightly with salt and nestle them in the chile paste, turning them once so they’re entirely coated. Pour in about 1/2 cup of the broth and adjust the heat to a simmer. Cover the pan and cook the chicken, turning once, until it’s extremely tender when pierced with a knife, 30 to 40 minutes (add a little more broth if the pan is drying out). When the chicken is done, remove it from the pan, let it cool a bit and cut or shred it into bite-size pieces, discarding any bones and bits of fat or gristle; set aside.

    Spoon off any visible grease in the pan, add the remaining broth and the cilantro stems, and simmer, uncovered until the broth has reduced by about one-third and is quite flavorful, 20 to 30 minutes.

    While the broth is reducing, fry the tortillas:

    Heat about an inch of oil in a high-sided saucepan over medium heat. When a tortilla sizzles immediately on contact with the oil, add six to eight strips to the pan. With tongs or long fork *scrunch* the for a second or so to make them wavy. Fry until the strips are no longer bubbling much and have become light brown. Drain on paper towels and continue with the rest of the strips.

    Divide the shredded chicken, the corn, the black beans, tomato and tortilla strips between two large soup bowls. Reheat the broth if necessary so it’s piping hot and pour it over the ingredients in the bowls. Serve immediately and let each diner add the avocado, cheese, sour cream, chopped cilantro and a big squeeze of lime juice at the table.

  28. #28
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    [QUOTE=Beachside;1522203]Hi All......well I didn't go Italian...well I did but I made an old recipe that I hauled out from a 1984 Southern Living...just cos I suddenly remembered it and wanted to try it again...a quick and thick meat sauce that we served over penne. Mmmmm...and nice *eat* down memory lane (from when I had kiddies at home).

    So to my game recipe. Uh, I bought a new (okay 4 new) cookbook this week...from the editors of Fine Cooking Magazine. I wanted to make a soup for a chilly evening (finally out of the 90s!). I'll be back later with results. QUOTE]

    Hi Susan, did my Ragu trigger your memory? We had some of it last night on a store bought Pizza crust with fresh garlic and onions. Boy, was it good.

    DH says the "front" will finally get here around 3 pm today. Maybe we can get out of the 90's

  29. #29
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    Susan, please shove the "front" down this way. It's after 2:00, my office is 80 with the air on 76. Oh for some cool weather. Oh, are you going to submit a list for next week?

    Here is the post again. Sorry

    It is that time again. Next week will be "Pantry Cleanout".

    For the newbies, here is how it goes. This week, submit on this weeks game, a list of 5 ingredients in your pantry that you would like to use up. This time we are also including herbs and spices. At the beginning of next weeks game, I will pick from your list and give you your item for the week. Easy as that.

    So that is starting tomorrow. Come on guys, I'm sure you all have at least a few things in your pantry you would like to use. Now is the time. Even if you want to submit just one item, that will be just fine, or more than 5, that would be great also.

  30. #30
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    I came to post my Italian recipe! I found a book in my repertoire called The Italian American Cookbook, by John and Galina Mariani. I don't remember where I got it -- probably from paperbackswap.com or maybe I bought it... I guess it didn't happen long enough ago for me to remember!

    Anyway, I have had polenta in my cupboard for a while, and never used it -- threw a tube of it away yesterday, but that's another story! The recipe I decided to make was:

    Polenta with Fontina

    Plain polenta can be pretty bland, so we always like to gussy it up a bit with other flavors -- in this case, the creamy richness of Fontina cheese.

    Serves 6 (at least)

    5 cups chicken broth
    1 2/3 cups sone-ground yellow cornmeal
    Salt, preferably Kosher
    3 oz Fontina cheese, cubed
    4 Tbsp unsalted butter (I used about 1/2 this amount)

    1. Pour the checken broth into a large saucepan with a heavy bottom. Add the cornmeal in a steady stream, stiffing continually to incorporate it into the broth. Stir in salt to taste. Turn the heat to medium and bring the polenta to a simmer, stirring constantly. Reduce the heat to the lowerst setting and continue cooking, stirring often, for 20 to 25 minutes.

    2. Add the Fontina and butter, and stir until the cheese has melted. Serve immediately, or transfer the polents to a double boiler and keep it warm over low heat for up to 1 hour.


    Sounds easy! I can do this!

    Except that I have an electric stove, and the lowest setting is practically off! So, the polenta never really set up the way it was supposed to. Not to worry, I'll just serve it with a spoon.... Even so, I found it uninspiring. It was bland, grainy (duh!) and really not appealing at all. I will attempt to cook it some more, and serve it again.... maybe fry it? And that will probably be my last attempt at this type of polenta. Too much work - as much as risotto - for less flavor!
    Kay
    I'm a WYSIWYG person -- no subterfuge here!

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