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Thread: Substition for Ancho Chili Powder?

  1. #1

    Substition for Ancho Chili Powder?

    I am making a stew that calls for ancho chili powder and the stores didn't have any. I have regular chili powder and chipotle chili powder. Any thoughts on which would be a better substitution?

  2. #2
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    Chipotle is very different -- both hotter and smokey in flavor. The regular chili powder sounds like chili seasoning -- a blend of chili powder and other herbs and seasonings. It won't have the same flavor, but it would probably be a safer substitution.

    How much does the recipe call for?

  3. #3
    Beth--here is the recipe. A friend posted it on her FB page and I thought I would try it. Didn't even realize it was a CL recipe. It calls for 2 tbs. ancho chili powder.

    Ancho Pork and Hominy Stew

    Yield: 6 servings (serving size: 1 1/3 cups)

    Ingredients
    2 tablespoons ancho chile powder
    2 teaspoons dried oregano
    1 1/2 teaspoons smoked paprika
    1 teaspoon ground cumin
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1 1/2 pounds pork tenderloin, trimmed and cut into 1/2-inch pieces
    1 tablespoon olive oil, divided
    2 cups chopped onion
    1 1/2 cups chopped green bell pepper
    1 tablespoon minced garlic
    2 1/2 cups fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth
    1 (28-ounce) can hominy, drained
    1 (14.5-ounce) can fire-roasted diced tomatoes, undrained
    Preparation
    1. Combine first 5 ingredients in a large bowl; set 1 1/2 teaspoons spice mixture aside. Add pork to remaining spice mixture in bowl, tossing well to coat.

    2. Heat 2 teaspoons oil in a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add pork mixture to pan; cook 5 minutes or until browned, stirring occasionally. Remove pork from pan; set aside. Add remaining 1 teaspoon oil to pan. Add onion, bell pepper, and garlic; sauté 5 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally. Return pork to pan. Add reserved 1 1/2 teaspoons spice mixture, broth, hominy, and tomatoes; bring to a boil. Partially cover, reduce heat, and simmer 25 minutes.

    Nutritional Information
    Calories:300
    Fat:8.3g (sat 2.1g,mono 3.7g,poly 1.4g)
    Protein:28.9g
    Carbohydrate:26.9g
    Fiber:6.1g
    Cholesterol:76mg
    Iron:3.2mg
    Sodium:523mg
    Calcium:51mg

  4. #4
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    That's a fair amount to make a change. A chili seasoning has the oregano, cumin, salt and stuff blended usually with one or two milder to medium peppers.

    You can grind your own, but I'm not sure where you are located and if your stores have Latin/Mexican food sections or dried chilies in the produce section like they do here.

    If this is on the menu today and you can't do ancho, I would add only the chili powder and not the other spices or salt until you have tasted it. Ancho has a mild, rich flavor that will probably be deeper than what you will get with the blend, but you don't want to overdo the salt and other stuff. For later, I can tell you that Penzey's has a very nice ground ancho. I've also ordered from Chimayo to go and also love their pasilla negro for sweet rich flavor. They are both worth having in your collection. Drop some in your stocking this Christmas.

    Beth, the enabler.

  5. #5
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    The printed recipe has a substitution note that says if you only have regular chili powder to use it instead, but reduce the cumin by half.

    Bob

  6. #6
    In How to Cook Everything, the recipe for making your own chili powder uses ancho chile powder as its primary ingredient. I'd probably use chili powder if I were in your shoes (unless you have a penzey's nearby?). Cutting back on the cumin as Bob recommended makes sense.

  7. #7
    Thanks everyone! I guess I will try the regular chili powder and report back!

  8. #8
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    This recipe sounds great, but I'm not familiar with hominy. Can someone tell me what it is and what purpose it serves in this recipe?

    I'm not sure I've ever seen canned hominy here in New England, but the rest of the recipe is tempting...

  9. #9
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    it's dried corn kernels that are boiled to make 'em soft and sorta nubbly. it adds a light note of corn flavor, the way i use it, along with texture and a little bit of body to the stew.

  10. #10
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    To answer further:

    hominy
    One of the first food gifts the American Indians gave to the colonists, hominy is dried white or yellow corn kernels from which the hull and germ have been removed. This process is done either mechanically or chemically by soaking the corn in slaked lime or lye. Hominy is sold canned, ready-to-eat or dried (which must be reconstituted before using). It's commonly served as a side dish or as part of a casserole. When dried hominy is broken or very coarsely ground it's called samp. When ground, it's called hominy grits — or simply grits — and usually comes in three grinds — fine, medium and coarse. Hominy grits are generally simmered with water or milk until very thick. The mixture can be served in this mushlike form or chilled, cut into squares and fried. In the South, grits are served as a side dish for breakfast or dinner.
    It's something a lot of people don't like. It has a peculiar grainy texture. Cooking dried hominy is better than canned.

    Sure, it's available in the Northeast, though I'm not sure where you are. Check the Goya section, where it's mixed in with the canned beans. Everybody has a Goya section, right?

    In the magazine, the recipe is paired with a jalapeno cornbread. Seems a bit redundant to me.

    Bob

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobmark226 View Post
    It's something a lot of people don't like. It has a peculiar grainy texture. Cooking dried hominy is better than canned.

    we like canned, but--
    Bob, I bought some dried at the co-op, figuring the crockpot would be an excellent way to make it. Have you done it that way?

  12. #12
    Just now enjoying this. It is really yummy! I subbed regular chili powder for the ancho and added a can of corn, since I misread the size of the can of hominy I needed. It is really tasty and relatively healthy, too!

  13. #13
    To further elaborate on hominy. . .I prefer white over yellow and much better prepared from dry vs. canned. I have never done mine in the crockpot. I usually do it on the stove or better yet(and faster) in the pressure cooker. If you try it in the pressure cooker, it does foam a bit so do not overload the pressure cooker and add a bit of oil. Save the broth it is cooked in as well. It adds wonderful flavor subbed for the water in stews, chilis, and soups. I usually do a pound at a time and then freeze in ziploc bags in my "grain bank" in 1 cup portions with some of the cooking broth.

    Karen

  14. #14
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    Thanks for the education, everyone. Now if I don't mention the word "grits" I might be able to get my husband to try it !

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by heavy hedonist View Post
    we like canned, but--
    Bob, I bought some dried at the co-op, figuring the crockpot would be an excellent way to make it. Have you done it that way?
    Oh, I like canned, too, Mari. Mark Bittman's simple posole from HTCEV is one of my favorite quick fixes! I've never done dried. I'm sure it's great, but I'm too busy cooking my dried beans!

    Bob

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobmark226 View Post
    Oh, I like canned, too, Mari. Mark Bittman's simple posole from HTCEV is one of my favorite quick fixes! I've never done dried. I'm sure it's great, but I'm too busy cooking my dried beans!
    Bob
    guess I'll wing it-- i was going to anyways... meaning to cook a posole sometime soon. maybe december.

  17. #17
    I made this last night and we really enjoyed it.......very nicely seasoned and tasty. Will be making it often.
    I did have the Ancho Chili powder and will keep this on hand.
    Thanks.

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