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Thread: Cut of meat for a pot roast?

  1. #1
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    Cut of meat for a pot roast?

    What do you use? For the 2nd time I have used a chuck roast and it was basicly unedible due to so much fat! Grossed me out.

    I am trying to remember what I have used before with success, a cross rib roast?

    TIA

    Laurie

  2. #2
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    I love chuck roast for pot roast but do trim the excess fat around the edge. I like it because it falls apart.

    Another cut is a rump roast (just made one with this cut on Saturday. This cut will be a slice-able roast and needs to be braised long and slow.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  3. #3
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    There was no fat on the outside of the roast but inside, very slimy.

    Thats what I remember what chuck roast is the way it falls apart, but 2 times in a row and form different grocrs I thought I was not remembering the right cut of meat.

  4. #4
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    I always trim those big chunks out and on the outside too if needed. It is fatty, but it cooks up so tender.

  5. #5
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    How about using a brisket?

  6. #6
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    I usually use beef round. The the pot-roast-type big chunks of beef (3-4 lbs) at my supermarket are usually top round or bottom round.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by sneezles View Post
    I love chuck roast for pot roast but do trim the excess fat around the edge. I like it because it falls apart.

    Another cut is a rump roast (just made one with this cut on Saturday. This cut will be a slice-able roast and needs to be braised long and slow.
    I love chuck roast. It depends on how you cook it. If in the crockpot, it will get over fatty and you need to separate it and remove fat. It is so tender and flavorful I would not dismiss it. I have also started wadding aluminum foil at the base so it does not not sit in fat.

  8. #8
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    I just made a chuck roast in the crockpot that turned out extremely well. I drain most of the liquid after it has cooked, thereby dumping out most of the cooked off fat.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  9. #9
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    I generally use chuck roast, but I trim out any hunks of fat before cooking and skim off cooked fat.

  10. #10
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    Besides cutting out hunks of fat when i make a chuck roast, I try to plan ahead by roasting it early
    in the day or the day before and refrigerate the meat and juices separately. Then, I lift that hunk of fat off and make the gravy. I serve it more like roast beef and gravy with the veggies on the side.

  11. #11
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    I don't think I've ever used another cut of beef for Pot Roast other than Chuck Roast in over 15 years! I'm just really picky about the chuck roasts that I buy. When I find good ones on sale I buy three or four and use the FoodSaver.

    I always either use the slowcooker or braise in my Dutch Oven in the oven on low and slow heat. I know it's a fattier cut but that's what makes it tender and flavorful! The great thing about a fork-tender pot roast is that you can lift it out onto a cutting board, chunk it up with two forks and literally scrape all the gooey fat off the chunks with a butter knife. It's a bit more work, but we've never eaten fat that way!
    ~ "The right shoe can change your life...."- Cinderella ~

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jewel View Post
    I don't think I've ever used another cut of beef for Pot Roast other than Chuck Roast in over 15 years! I'm just really picky about the chuck roasts that I buy. When I find good ones on sale I buy three or four and use the FoodSaver.

    I always either use the slowcooker or braise in my Dutch Oven in the oven on low and slow heat. I know it's a fattier cut but that's what makes it tender and flavorful! The great thing about a fork-tender pot roast is that you can lift it out onto a cutting board, chunk it up with two forks and literally scrape all the gooey fat off the chunks with a butter knife. It's a bit more work, but we've never eaten fat that way!
    Jewel, I'm a meat novice and wonder how you determine a good chuck roast. I've had them previously and this was my BEST one yet (just finished leftovers tonight)...but I have no idea why some are better than others. Help!
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by wallycat View Post
    Jewel, I'm a meat novice and wonder how you determine a good chuck roast. I've had them previously and this was my BEST one yet (just finished leftovers tonight)...but I have no idea why some are better than others. Help!
    Honestly, I just mean good and lean without being a Chuck Shoulder! I've bought Chuck Shoulder roasts a few times because they looked more lean, and figured as long as they said 'chuck' on the label it would be tender. Not so much. Each time I've cooked them the same way as always and they've been tough and flavorless. I read on some meat website that it was one of the least flavorful cuts of the animal so I've stayed away.

    I just look for as much meat as I can get with as little visible fat as possible! I often use Chuck Roast for other things, like cut up for beef stew, beef stroganoff, chili, etc. I fully expect when cubing that roast to lose at least a pound of it in fat and gristle, but the lean/marbled cubes I end up with are some of the most tender and mouth-watering beef I've ever tasted. Last week I sauteed mushrooms and onions in a bit of butter in my French Oven, browned some of the beef cubes in seasoned flour, then mixed it all together and added low sodium beef broth, 1/2 packet of onion soup mix and (gasp!) two cans of low sodium cream of mushroom soup. Braised for 2 hours in a 325* oven and served over egg noodles. Yum. Leftovers tomorrow night and I can't wait. Just melt-in-your-mouth tender!
    ~ "The right shoe can change your life...."- Cinderella ~

  14. #14
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    Thank you!
    I gather "shoulder" is labeled as such?

    Oye, I need a second freezer
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  15. #15
    I use the Cooks Illustrated method of trimming out the fat between the 2 muscles and then tying the roast back together. I'm not sure this will work, but I'll try to post their directions:

    STEP-BY-STEP
    Preparing a Chuck-Eye Roast

    1. Pull roast apart at its major seam (delineated by lines of fat) into two halves. Use knife as necessary.


    2. With knife, remove large knobs of fat from each piece, leaving thin layer of fat on meat.


    3. Tie three pieces of kitchen twine around each piece of meat to keep it from falling apart.

  16. #16
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    Chuck is by far my favorite too.
    A well rounded person is perfectly pointless. - Carrie

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