Community Message Boards
Results 1 to 27 of 27

Thread: Indianapolis Foods?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    693

    Indianapolis Foods?

    Are there any foods/dishes that Indianapolis is known for? I did a search and could only come up with fried pork tenderloin. I'm going to a Super Bowl party, and we're all bringing finger foods so I didn't think the fried tenderloin would work all that well (but maybe I coud do bite-size pieces on skewers). So many good options for New Orleans, but I'm coming up blank for Indianapolis.
    "Red meat is not bad for you. Now blue-green meat, that's bad for you."
    ~Tommy Smothers

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Boca Raton, Florida
    Posts
    11,387
    I have an article by Jane and Michael Stern from their "Taste of America" series. It is about a place called Dodd's Town House in Indianapolis that they say is very, very popular. They provided a recipe for their famous Buttermilk Pie. If you want the recipe, please let me know.

    I also have a recipe for Warm Spinach Salad with Honey-Mustard Dressing from the Canterbury Hotel in Indianapolis.

    What about food served at the Indianapolis Speed Way?

    Opps, never mind. Finger food Next time I will put on my reading glasses.
    Last edited by cookieee; 02-03-2010 at 09:19 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    121
    I can suggest chicken wings or french fries / onion rings

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by ___Rhianna___ View Post
    Are there any foods/dishes that Indianapolis is known for? I did a search and could only come up with fried pork tenderloin. I'm going to a Super Bowl party, and we're all bringing finger foods so I didn't think the fried tenderloin would work all that well (but maybe I coud do bite-size pieces on skewers). So many good options for New Orleans, but I'm coming up blank for Indianapolis.
    Those fried tenderloins sound awefully good. Can you make mini?
    Here is a link for more ideas:
    http://www.indyscribe.com/restaurant...ure_foods.html

  5. #5
    Although White Castle didn't really start in Indy, we all thought it did (it is a "midwestern" chain). How about making some sliders for your party, as the mini-burgers are known. If you don't want to make them, you can get them frozen at Costco and such.
    "When you are in love with someone you want to be near him all the time, except when you are out buying things and charging them to him." Miss Piggy

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Southeastern CT
    Posts
    2,357
    I heard a thing on NPR this morning about cooking for Superbowl parties, and the two Indiana things that I remember were the fried pork tenderloins and also popcorn - lots of it is grown in southern Indiana.
    <)>>< Candace ><<)>

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Nashville TN
    Posts
    7,377
    I have to admit, the first thing I thought of when I saw the title was fried pork tenderloin

    yum!

    Also, Indiana is known for good tomatoes and corn. Red Gold Company is there (ketchup, salsa etc).

    Id do the pork fritter (another name for our yummy fried meat!)

    I used to love mine with mayo, mustard, lettuce and pickle. Oh, sometimes I miss home!
    ~Kim~

    Nashville Restaurant Examiner - check out my page
    Check out my blog: Zen Kitchen http://onehotkitchen-kim.blogspot.com/

    "Without question, the greatest invention in the history of mankind is beer. Oh, I grant you that the wheel was also a fine invention, but the wheel does not go nearly as well with pizza."
    Dave Barry

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    693
    Great ideas, everyone. Thanks! I'm beginning to think the fried pork tenderloin could easily be done as a finger food. I may give that a try.
    "Red meat is not bad for you. Now blue-green meat, that's bad for you."
    ~Tommy Smothers

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    19,680
    I thought about this thread when I heard that segment, too, Candace. The recipe on the NPR website looks really good! Here's the transcript.
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Nashville TN
    Posts
    7,377
    Quote Originally Posted by Canice View Post
    I thought about this thread when I heard that segment, too, Candace. The recipe on the NPR website looks really good! Here's the transcript.
    I cant believe I forgot about popcorn - Orville Redenbocker is from there!
    ~Kim~

    Nashville Restaurant Examiner - check out my page
    Check out my blog: Zen Kitchen http://onehotkitchen-kim.blogspot.com/

    "Without question, the greatest invention in the history of mankind is beer. Oh, I grant you that the wheel was also a fine invention, but the wheel does not go nearly as well with pizza."
    Dave Barry

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Kenmore NY, near Buffalo
    Posts
    6,181
    Quote Originally Posted by MealsMadeWLove View Post
    I can suggest chicken wings or french fries / onion rings
    trust me-- i lived there for 14 years, their wings are not worth eating, they will never be known for them.
    Last edited by heavy hedonist; 02-04-2010 at 04:18 PM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Kenmore NY, near Buffalo
    Posts
    6,181
    Quote Originally Posted by ___Rhianna___ View Post
    Great ideas, everyone. Thanks! I'm beginning to think the fried pork tenderloin could easily be done as a finger food. I may give that a try.
    Indy is a fast food and chain restaurant town-- but pork tenderloin sandwiches are ubiquitous there, and sometimes even good. ranch dressing is the condiment of choice for almost any occasion ,and sadly they even dip their wings in it, which no proper Buffalonian would do. they do have a thing about hand-dipped thick milkshakes too-- Steak-n-Shake restaurants are found in every corner of the city.
    The real essential cuisine of Indy is not to be found in restaurants, though there are a few odd non-chain restaurants here and there. I lived there 14 years, and what i discovered was that if you want good food, you had to go to church suppers.
    i don't do that. but, here is a recipe from an Indiana friend of mine that was a standard-- lots of people i met there new this dish. Mennonite dishes are common, BTW.

    Pretzel Salad (actually a type of rich cheesecake-like dessert)

    Crust:

    1 C crushed pretzels
    1/2 C sugar
    1/2 C (1/4 lb stick unsalted butter)
    Mix together in medium bowl. spread in 1 1/2- 2 qt. glass baking dish and bake @325 degrees F. for 8 minutes. Let cool.

    Filling:

    3 oz cream cheese
    1 container of Cool Whip (not FF)
    1/2 C sugar
    Mix together, spread evenly over crust.

    Top Layer:

    1 14.5-0z can crushed pineapple
    2 Tbsp cornstarch
    Cook in small saucepan over medium-low heat till thick. Let cool, spread on top of filling. Chill at least 3 hours. Serve cold.

    This is really sweet as written, I always reduce the sugar in the filling by about half and sometimes lower the sugar in the crust a bit too. But it's tasty and a little different.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Kenmore NY, near Buffalo
    Posts
    6,181
    Quote Originally Posted by cookieee View Post
    I have an article by Jane and Michael Stern from their "Taste of America" series. It is about a place called Dodd's Town House in Indianapolis that they say is very, very popular. They provided a recipe for their famous Buttermilk Pie. If you want the recipe, please let me know.
    Cookieee, i used to pass by that place all the time on the way home from one of my personal chef clients... i would like the recipe! i dig buttermilk pie, and i'm always looking for the ultimate.

  14. #14
    Haha...my husband is from Indy and when i asked him what he thought he could only come up with fried pork tenderloin! He even forgot about corn. He then added "Steak and Shake."

    We're not going with a theme, just apps we like, as you can see there isn't much selection! Go Colts!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Nashville TN
    Posts
    7,377
    Funny thing, I hadnt had a pork fritter for 20ish years. A few years ago I went to the State Fair with my mom. We shared one for lunch. I was prepared for it to not taste as good as I remembered (like most unhealthy foods from childhood).

    I was wrong. It was amazing. I am now craving one!

    And I am soooooo ashamed I forgot to say:

    GO COLTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    ~Kim~

    Nashville Restaurant Examiner - check out my page
    Check out my blog: Zen Kitchen http://onehotkitchen-kim.blogspot.com/

    "Without question, the greatest invention in the history of mankind is beer. Oh, I grant you that the wheel was also a fine invention, but the wheel does not go nearly as well with pizza."
    Dave Barry

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Boca Raton, Florida
    Posts
    11,387
    Quote Originally Posted by heavy hedonist View Post
    Cookieee, i used to pass by that place all the time on the way home from one of my personal chef clients... i would like the recipe! i dig buttermilk pie, and i'm always looking for the ultimate.
    Hi Mari, I haven't made it so I don't know if it is the ultimate, but here it is.

    Buttermilk Pie

    Dough for a one-crust, 9" pie
    1 cup sugar
    3 TB flour
    3 eggs, beaten
    4 TB butter, melted and cooled
    1 cup buttermilk
    1/2 tsp vanilla extract
    2 TB lemon juice
    1 TB grated lemon zest
    1/2 tsp grated nutmeg

    Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

    Line pie pan with dough. ***** with fork and press a piece of aluminum foil snugly into the pan, covering the dough. Bake 6 minutes. Remove foil. Bake 4 minutes more, until edges of crust begin to turn pale brown. Remove from oven and cool.

    In a large bowl mix together sugar and flour. Beat in eggs, then melted butter, buttermilk, vanilla extract, lemon juice and zest.

    Pour filling into cooled shell and bake (at 425) 10 minutes. Sprinkle top with nutmeg. Lower temperature to 350 and bake 30 minutes more, or until knife inserted in center comes out clean.

    Remove from oven and cool. (Center will deflate as pie cools.) Serve lukewarm, but refrigerate leftover pie.

    Per Serving (1 slice) 316 calories

    Dodd's Town House
    5694 N. Meridian St.
    Indianapolis, Ind. 46208
    1-317-257-1872

    Source: Sun Sentinal-June 1990 Jane and Michael Stern-Taste of America

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Nashville TN
    Posts
    7,377
    Anyone know if this is the same as Sugar Cream Pie (my mom's fav!). I didnt realize it was an IN thing
    ~Kim~

    Nashville Restaurant Examiner - check out my page
    Check out my blog: Zen Kitchen http://onehotkitchen-kim.blogspot.com/

    "Without question, the greatest invention in the history of mankind is beer. Oh, I grant you that the wheel was also a fine invention, but the wheel does not go nearly as well with pizza."
    Dave Barry

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Boca Raton, Florida
    Posts
    11,387
    Quote Originally Posted by kwormann View Post
    Anyone know if this is the same as Sugar Cream Pie (my mom's fav!). I didnt realize it was an IN thing
    Hi, I did a search and found this info.

    "Sugar cream pie, or Hoosier sugar cream pie, Indiana cream pie, sugar pie, or finger pie, is simply a pie shell spread with layers of creamed butter and maple or brown sugar with a sprinkling of flour, then filled with vanilla-flavored cream and baked.

    1850s - The recipe appears to have originated in Indiana with the Shaker and/or Amish communities in the 1800s as a great pie recipe to use when the apple bins were empty. You will find somewhat similar pies in the Pennsylvania Dutch County and a few other places in the United States with significant Amish populations. The Shakers believed in eating hearty and healthy food. They definitely must have had a sweet tooth, though, judging by the sugar cream pie.

    This pie was also know as finger pie because the filling was sometimes stirred with a finger during the baking process to prevent breaking the bottom crust. People used to skim the thick yellow cream from the top of chilled fresh milk to make this delectable dessert."

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Kenmore NY, near Buffalo
    Posts
    6,181
    Thanks for the recipe Cookieee! We'll see how it stacks up to the others... it looks good.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Nashville TN
    Posts
    7,377
    Quote Originally Posted by cookieee View Post
    Hi, I did a search and found this info.

    "Sugar cream pie, or Hoosier sugar cream pie, Indiana cream pie, sugar pie, or finger pie, is simply a pie shell spread with layers of creamed butter and maple or brown sugar with a sprinkling of flour, then filled with vanilla-flavored cream and baked.

    1850s - The recipe appears to have originated in Indiana with the Shaker and/or Amish communities in the 1800s as a great pie recipe to use when the apple bins were empty. You will find somewhat similar pies in the Pennsylvania Dutch County and a few other places in the United States with significant Amish populations. The Shakers believed in eating hearty and healthy food. They definitely must have had a sweet tooth, though, judging by the sugar cream pie.

    This pie was also know as finger pie because the filling was sometimes stirred with a finger during the baking process to prevent breaking the bottom crust. People used to skim the thick yellow cream from the top of chilled fresh milk to make this delectable dessert."
    thanks! Ive never been a huge fan, but hadnt even had a taste in years til this past christmas when mom had one. Boy is it rich!
    ~Kim~

    Nashville Restaurant Examiner - check out my page
    Check out my blog: Zen Kitchen http://onehotkitchen-kim.blogspot.com/

    "Without question, the greatest invention in the history of mankind is beer. Oh, I grant you that the wheel was also a fine invention, but the wheel does not go nearly as well with pizza."
    Dave Barry

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    In
    Posts
    5,893
    A little late to the party, but... I have this Historical Indiana Cookbook by Patricia Camden Knott. She presented a series at our local library in 1978. Boy, was I.. young. Anyway, today I am making a butterscotch pie and tomorrow I'm making the buttermilk pie to take to a super bowl party.. Now I just have to make the pie crust. And get dinner together for friends who are coming over at 6:00.

    Butterscotch pie
    6tbs. butter[I use unsalted]
    1 c. dark brown sugar
    3/4 c. boiling water
    3 Tbs corn star ch
    1/2 tsp. salt
    2 C milk part cream { I used 1/2c. heavy cream and 1 1/2 c 1%milk}
    4 egg yolks
    1 tsp. vanilla
    Melt butter in an iron skillet til golden brown. Add brown sugar cook until it boils. Add boiling water and remove from heat. [Stand back because it sputters.]
    In another pan/pot mix corn starch, flour, and salt. Blend in milk stir until smooth. Add syrup mixture.Boil one minute and remove from heat. Pour a little of the mixture into the beaten egg yolks and blend back into the hot mixture. Boil one minute and remove from heat. Add vanilla. Cool and pour into a baked cooled pie shell.
    I will top with a meringue.

  22. #22
    Too late to be of any help, but I lived there for 11 years (until just several months ago) and would definitely say pork tenderloin and corn. There aren't a lot of foods that Indy is known for (although I would dispute the idea that you must attend a church dinner to get anything decent -- there are some wonderful locally owned restaurants!). The city just doesn't have that Philly cheese steak or Chicago style pizza type of identification with a food or dish. Sugar cream pie definitely comes to mind, though, too. And Pizza King pizza, though that is something that mostly seems to appeal to those born there. ;-)

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Nashville TN
    Posts
    7,377
    *sigh*. Pizza King. Good to the very edge
    ~Kim~

    Nashville Restaurant Examiner - check out my page
    Check out my blog: Zen Kitchen http://onehotkitchen-kim.blogspot.com/

    "Without question, the greatest invention in the history of mankind is beer. Oh, I grant you that the wheel was also a fine invention, but the wheel does not go nearly as well with pizza."
    Dave Barry

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    In
    Posts
    5,893
    Quote Originally Posted by cookieee View Post
    Hi Mari, I haven't made it so I don't know if it is the ultimate, but here it is.

    Buttermilk Pie

    Dough for a one-crust, 9" pie
    1 cup sugar
    3 TB flour
    3 eggs, beaten
    4 TB butter, melted and cooled
    1 cup buttermilk
    1/2 tsp vanilla extract
    2 TB lemon juice
    1 TB grated lemon zest
    1/2 tsp grated nutmeg

    Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

    Line pie pan with dough. ***** with fork and press a piece of aluminum foil snugly into the pan, covering the dough. Bake 6 minutes. Remove foil. Bake 4 minutes more, until edges of crust begin to turn pale brown. Remove from oven and cool.

    In a large bowl mix together sugar and flour. Beat in eggs, then melted butter, buttermilk, vanilla extract, lemon juice and zest.

    Pour filling into cooled shell and bake (at 425) 10 minutes. Sprinkle top with nutmeg. Lower temperature to 350 and bake 30 minutes more, or until knife inserted in center comes out clean.

    Remove from oven and cool. (Center will deflate as pie cools.) Serve lukewarm, but refrigerate leftover pie.

    Per Serving (1 slice) 316 calories

    Dodd's Town House
    5694 N. Meridian St.
    Indianapolis, Ind. 46208
    1-317-257-1872

    Source: Sun Sentinal-June 1990 Jane and Michael Stern-Taste of America
    I made this pie to take to friends house today, and it was quite tasty. Althouugh the technique here is different, it is the same recipe that is in my Historical Indiana Cookbook.

    I have never had Pizza King. Must be a southern/central Indiana delicacy?

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Boca Raton, Florida
    Posts
    11,387
    Thank you for letting us know. I am curious to try it myself.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    19,680
    This is a little late, but I'm guessing crow would be appropriate
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    In
    Posts
    5,893
    Quote Originally Posted by Canice View Post
    This is a little late, but I'm guessing crow would be appropriate
    With a balsamic glaze.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •