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Thread: Heavy Cream vs. Heavy Whipping Cream

  1. #1
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    Heavy Cream vs. Heavy Whipping Cream

    It appears that I can no longer find heavy cream in my dairy dept. There is a heavy whipping cream, but I've read whipping cream has additive(s).

    I use heavy cream in my creme brulee, which calls for 4-5 cups.

    Opinions on HC vs. HWC??

    TIA ~ Linda

  2. #2
    I believe they are the same thing. There isn't a difference.

  3. #3
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    They are the same thing and neither would contain additives.

    Perhaps you are thinking about ultra pasteurized heavy or whipping cream as I believe some purists make a distinction -- but ultra pasteurized stuff doesn't have additives but is pasteurized to ensure longer shelf life.
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  4. #4
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    You made me curious and I have a carton in my fridge. It's labeled whipping cream. Grade A, ultra-pasteurized. The ingredients are cream and less than 1% of each of the following: mono and digycerides, polysorbate 80 and carrageenan. (So, it contains stabilizers, emulsifiers and thickeners).

    I'm pretty sure this is the only kind I've seen at the grocery store but I'll have to take a look this afternoon.
    For those in touch with it, Reality is the leading cause of stress.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by tovie View Post
    You made me curious and I have a carton in my fridge. It's labeled whipping cream. Grade A, ultra-pasteurized. The ingredients are cream and less than 1% of each of the following: mono and digycerides, polysorbate 80 and carrageenan. (So, it contains stabilizers, emulsifiers and thickeners).

    I'm pretty sure this is the only kind I've seen at the grocery store but I'll have to take a look this afternoon.
    Interesting since recipes for whipped cream generally contain tips for preventing break downs so the additives are commercial solutions. It's equivalent to some "modern meat" which is packed in what is the equivalent of a brine.

    To my knowledge I've never bought "whipping cream" as I can't remember the last time I made "whipped cream" or even used it as a base for something like a whipped cream frosting.

    I've used heavy cream for preparations which have stabilizers built in (i.e. salmon or chocolate mousse which rely on gelatin and/or egg whites) or ganache -- or in cooked foods for texture.
    Some days I pray for Silence, Some days I pray for Soul,
    Some days I just pray to the God of Sex and Drums and Rock 'N' Roll.

    Meatloaf

  6. #6
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    Around here (the dairy state!!) we even have additives in
    the 1/2 & 1/2
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  7. #7
    I wonder if the difference is just the brand. I've seen plain sour cream that has a bunch of stuff added to it and I've seen it with no additives. The only difference was the brands. They were all regular sour cream, not light or fat free. If that makes any sense.

  8. #8
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    I currently have both in my refrigerator (TJs Heavy Cream & Knudson’s Heavy Whipping Cream) & have often had the same question as TitlePending.

    I occasionally ask the grocery store dairy personnel and they always answer that they are the same thing; however from the nutrition facts you can see a difference in both the Total Fat and Saturated Fat amounts listed:

    Heavy Cream 6g total fat; Saturated fat 3 g.
    Heavy Whipping Cream 5g total fat; Saturated fat 3.5 g.

    Also, the Knudsen Heavy Whipping Cream lists more stabilizers: cream, nonfat solids, stabilizer (mono- and diglycerides, carrageenan, polysorbate 80, standardized w/Dextrose)

    TJs Heavy Cream lists simply cream & carrageenan.

    My major grocery chain store no longer offers Heavy Cream – only Heavy Whipping Cream. If I desire Heavy Cream, I travel to TJs to purchase it. So where I am grocery shopping usually dictates what I buy to use in a recipe; although after this post, I would prefer using the Heavy Cream.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by wallycat View Post
    Around here (the dairy state!!) we even have additives in
    the 1/2 & 1/2
    Too funny!

    Thank you all for taking the time. I'll just buy the HWC and see how my Brulee turns out. Linda ~

  10. #10
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    The difference isn't just a name, in theory-- heavy cream, heavy whipping cream, light cream, half-n-half and table cream are all based, in our not too distant past, on the amount of butterfat in them, with table cream, half-n-half
    and light cream being similarly lighter, as well as having possible additives. of course now we have FF 1/2 & 1/2 as well. (yuck!)
    there used to be more strict industry standards, but as sales moved away from home delivery (and even before that) things changed, and now you'd almost have to ask each individual provider what those ratios are for them. i had a general chart somewhere around here, but can't remember where just now. If I should find it, I'll post it.
    for practical use nowadays, heavy cream and whipping cream and heavy whipping cream serve the same purpose; but for making ice cream, all big name chefs/cooks prefer to use cream that is not ultra-pasteurized, because of the chemical flavors that show up-- and it does react a little differently in certain recipes...
    though personally, I've had to use ultra-p. anyway, because it's often the only kind available to me.
    Charlaps Dairy cream and half-n-half is the best i've ever tasted.

    ETA: Foodfly, we must have been posting at the same moment! thanks for the specifics!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by heavy hedonist View Post
    The difference isn't just a name, in theory-- heavy cream, heavy whipping cream, light cream, half-n-half and table cream are all based, in our not too distant past, on the amount of butterfat in them, with table cream, half-n-half
    and light cream being similarly lighter, as well as having possible additives. of course now we have FF 1/2 & 1/2 as well. (yuck!)
    there used to be more strict industry standards, but as sales moved away from home delivery (and even before that) things changed, and now you'd almost have to ask each individual provider what those ratios are for them. i had a general chart somewhere around here, but can't remember where just now. If I should find it, I'll post it.
    for practical use nowadays, heavy cream and whipping cream and heavy whipping cream serve the same purpose; but for making ice cream, all big name chefs/cooks prefer to use cream that is not ultra-pasteurized, because of the chemical flavors that show up-- and it does react a little differently in certain recipes...
    though personally, I've had to use ultra-p. anyway, because it's often the only kind available to me.
    Charlaps Dairy cream and half-n-half is the best i've ever tasted.

    ETA: Foodfly, we must have been posting at the same moment! thanks for the specifics!
    When we used to shop in Canada for the week at our cabin, I was amazed to see the milk and cream labeled by percentages of fat in each! But it sure would make it easier for recipes, wouldn't it?
    Kay
    I'm a WYSIWYG person -- no subterfuge here!

  12. #12
    This is a big problem in dairy products. Many have been adulterated with additives and thickeners (to make up for thinning them with cheaper dairy products, such as skim milk). And some additives are to extend shelf life.

    The only thing to do is to read the labels.

    I buy Daisy Brand Sour Cream because it contains cream and a culture and that's all. Many brands (esp. store brands) have a long list of additives.

    Buttermilk has become similarly adulterated. It's getting hard to find buttermilk that doesn't have cornstarch, locust bean gum, sodium citrate, carrageenan, mono & diglycerides, etc. There are a few brands of traditional buttermilk out there, but you have to search.

    Cream also. (The brand with the highest fat content and calories is likely to be the purest; also look for fewest additives.)

    Manufacturers are looking for the cheapest way to make products, believing that Americans make shopping decisions based solely on price.

    To buck this trend, we have to shop carefully, read labels, and be willing to pay a bit more for quality when necessary.

  13. #13
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    I'm back from the trek to TJs and purchased Organic Valley Heavy Whipping Cream Grade A Pasturized. The ingredient lists only Organic Grade A Cream (Milk). The total fat is 6g and 3.5g is saturated. So how often do you have creme brulee?? I want the richness

    Again, I really appreciate everyone's input. Linda ~

  14. #14
    I've bought Organic Valley whipping cream, and it is great!

    The problems I have with adulterated products is (1) the deception - people who read Sour Cream on a product think they are actually getting soured cream and (2) the adulterated products do not perform in recipes the way they should; this is especially true in baking.

    I think it's important to buy the good stuff, even if we have to pay more, and to tell store managers that we expect them to stock the real thing, whether that's buttermilk, cream or sour cream.

  15. #15
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    Well, my grocery store actually has both. I knew there were two different cartons but I had assumed it was simply a size difference because at a glance, they look the same except one's bigger. The larger one I mentioned earlier is a pint, is called whipping cream, and has the additives. The smaller one is 1/2 pint, is called heavy cream and contains just cream.

    It's funny, I usually buy the smaller one but I was going to try making caramel again and wanted to make sure I had plenty in case I messed up So I guess from now on I'll stick to the smaller ones and just buy more if I need more than a cup.
    For those in touch with it, Reality is the leading cause of stress.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by peachesncream View Post
    This is a big problem in dairy products. Many have been adulterated with additives and thickeners (to make up for thinning them with cheaper dairy products, such as skim milk). And some additives are to extend shelf life.

    The only thing to do is to read the labels.

    I buy Daisy Brand Sour Cream because it contains cream and a culture and that's all. Many brands (esp. store brands) have a long list of additives.

    Buttermilk has become similarly adulterated. It's getting hard to find buttermilk that doesn't have cornstarch, locust bean gum, sodium citrate, carrageenan, mono & diglycerides, etc. There are a few brands of traditional buttermilk out there, but you have to search.

    Cream also. (The brand with the highest fat content and calories is likely to be the purest; also look for fewest additives.)

    Manufacturers are looking for the cheapest way to make products, believing that Americans make shopping decisions based solely on price.

    To buck this trend, we have to shop carefully, read labels, and be willing to pay a bit more for quality when necessary.
    I have a half-pint of "heavy whipping cream" and its ingredients list consists of just pasteurized grade 'a' cream. Organic Valley is the only brand I've ever seen that is ultra-pasteurized, but it's a national brand while the others are local; presumably they don't need the extended shelf life if they have limited distribution?
    And I totally agree about sour cream; it's ridiculous, the number of ingredients listed on the carton of Safeway's store brand when Daisy has just the one ingredient and is SO much better - and doesn't cost much more.
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  17. #17
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    Wanted to let everyone know the brulee (burnt creme) turned out great! I had to buy 3 pints at $2.79 each and it was worth every darn cent! You know, I'd never looked at sour cream labels, but for whatever reason have always purchased Daisy brand, guess I just got lucky! Now I'm going to have to check out buttermilk ingredient labels! Linda ~

  18. #18
    I'm glad your brulee turned out so well! Sounds fabulous. Whenever I see that on a menu, I order it.

    Chefs are always saying "you can't have good food without good ingredients". I think that is so true.

    FYI - When a recipe calls for Half & Half (like my favorite pound cake), I make my own, mixing heavy cream with equal amounts of milk. That way I know I'm getting half & half. I have no idea the proportions of each in commercial half & half (but I have noticed that milk or skim milk is listed first).

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