Community Message Boards
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: How to use Jerusalem artichokes?

  1. #1

    How to use Jerusalem artichokes?

    There were Jerusalem artichokes in my produce box this week. At first I did not even know what they were. I don't have a clue how to use them, and there are few recipes online. Does anyone have some pointers on how to prepare them or some recipes?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    19,680
    Yum! In restaurants I see them used mostly in a purée, to set a piece of poultry or fish on, or else in soup. At home I just scrub them up, slice (maybe 1/4 inch) and toss with olive oil and salt and pepper and roast. I've also had them roasted whole with thyme sprigs, like small potatoes. When done just crack 'em open and add a pat of butter or drizzle of olive oil, and salt.
    Something I've been meaning to try is making a gratin with them. Something simple where their flavor will shine through, though; maybe just a little half-and-half, thyme, and Asiago cheese.
    I would say that any way you would prepare a small potato you can prepare sunchokes. But they're so much tastier.
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    877
    I love Jerusalem artichokes too. Like Canice, in restaurants I've generally had them pureed and as a side for meats. In Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone, Deborah Madison has a few ideas for simpler preparations. They're basically what Canice is talking about, either roasting or sauteeing. I think the braising recipe sounds great!

    Amy

    Roasted Jerusalem Artichokes
    - Deborah Madison, Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone

    1 lb Jerusalem artichokes, sliced into 1/2-in rounds or left whole
    1-2 Tbsp sunflower oil
    Salt and pepper
    A few rosemary or thyme sprigs

    heat oven to 400. Toss Jerusalem artichokes with oil and 1/2 tsp salt. Bake in a gratin dish with the herb for 20-30 min. Pierce with the tip of a knife - They should be mostly tender but offer some resistance. Season with pepper.

    Sauteed Jerusalem Artichokes with Sunflower Seeds

    - Deborah Madison, Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone

    1 lb Jerusalem artichokes, sliced into 1/4-in rounds
    2 Tbsp sunflower oil
    Salt and pepper
    3 Tbsp toasted sunflower seeds
    2 Tbsp chopped parsley
    1 tsp chopped thyme

    Saute the Jerusalem artichokes in the oil in a large skillet over high heat until lightly browned and tender but still a bit crisp. Taste them as the cook; they can be done in 5 min or as long as 10. Season with salt and pepper, add the remaining ingredients, and toss well.

    Wine-glazed Jerusalem artichokes with Rosemary
    - Deborah Madison, Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone

    1 1/2 Tbsp EVOO
    1 lb Jerusalem artichokes, sliced into rounds
    1 garlic clove, finely chopped
    Salt and freshly milled pepper
    2 tsp chopped rosemary
    1/2 C dry white wine

    Heat the oil in a wide skillet. Add the Jerusalem artichokes and garlic and saute for about 1 1/2 min. Season with salt and pepper, add the rosemary and wine, and continue to cook over high heat until the wine is reduced to a few tablespoons. Add 1 Tbsp water, cover, and cook for a minute or more or until tender-crisp. Although they can turn quite mushy in an instant, they can also take as long as 10 minutes. Boil the excess liquid, if any, down to a glaze.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    VA Suburbs of DC
    Posts
    251
    I had the best Jerusalem artichokes at Craftsteak in Las Vegas. I wrote the restaurant for the recipe but never got a reply.

    They were made like homefries. They were so good.
    Cookie baker and cake decorator

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    19,680
    For some reason that recipe with sunflower seeds really appeals to me!
    Not sure if sunchockes are still in the market, but I'll check on Saturday
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    1,910
    Quote Originally Posted by Canice View Post
    For some reason that recipe with sunflower seeds really appeals to me!
    Not sure if sunchockes are still in the market, but I'll check on Saturday
    Probably because they're related to the sunflower, which is what I found out when I "Googled" sunchokes to see if they're related to horseradish which is what they mildly tasted of when we ate them the other night. I'm still trying, I'm still trying, I'm still trying.

    I have leftovers I've been eating for lunch, and I'm up to tolerating.

    They look so lovely pureed, and I really want to like them!
    For Pete's sake, now I blog!
    http://www.ifagioli.com/

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    19,680
    Duh! Why didn't I think of that?
    I guess you've also learned that the Jerusalem part is probably a corruption of girasole, Italian for sunflower. I remember being stuck on a train in the middle of a huge field of sunflowers in Italy - what a remarkable sight!
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Kenmore NY, near Buffalo
    Posts
    6,181
    This is one I've always meant to try-- looks so enticing! from Food and Wine-- the website has about 8 other recipes, i think. if i hadn't just put away all my winter food mags, i could've posted a soup recipe from the late, great Patrick Clark; it's not archived at the F&W site anymore.

    Jerusalem Artichoke Hummus with Spiced Oil
    SERVINGS: 8

    Ingredients

    1 1/2 teaspoons fennel seeds
    1 1/2 teaspoons coriander seeds
    1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
    2 teaspoons hot paprika
    1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    12 medium pita breads, cut into 8 wedges each
    2 pounds Jerusalem artichokes
    One 19-ounce can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
    2 garlic cloves, smashed
    1/3 cup sesame tahini
    1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
    Salt and freshly ground pepper
    1 tablespoon coarsely chopped flat-leaf parsley

    Directions

    1.In a small skillet, stir the fennel and coriander seeds over moderate heat until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the crushed pepper and paprika and cook, stirring, for 30 seconds longer.
    2.Transfer the spices to a blender. Add the oil and blend until almost smooth. Pour the spiced oil into a jar, cover and let stand overnight at room temperature. Strain the oil through cheesecloth and discard the spices.
    3.Preheat the oven to 375°. Spread the pitas on 2 large baking sheets and toast for about 12 minutes, or until crisp.
    4.Spread the Jerusalem artichokes on a rimmed baking sheet, cover tightly with foil and bake until tender, about 45 minutes to 1 1/4 hours, depending on their size. Remove them as they are done and let cool to room temperature. Using a small metal spoon, scoop out and reserve the flesh, discarding the skins.
    5.In a food processor, puree the chickpeas and garlic. Add the Jerusalem artichokes, tahini and lemon juice and process until smooth. Season with salt and pepper to taste and let stand for at least 2 hours or refrigerate overnight.
    6.Spoon the hummus into a bowl, drizzle with 2 tablespoons of the spiced oil and garnish with the parsley. Serve the crisp pita chips alongside.

    7.ONE SERVING Calories 436 kcal, Total Fat 11 gm, Saturated Fat 1.4 gm

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •