Community Message Boards
Results 1 to 26 of 26

Thread: Getting crispy skin when baking a cut up chicken?

  1. #1

    Getting crispy skin when baking a cut up chicken?

    I don't buy split chicken breasts with the skin on that often --except perhaps to bake some chicken for chicken salad (saw that on Barefoot Contessa and now its my go to way --- I think sooo much better than poaching).

    However, a couple of days ago I was baking some chicken breasts for dinner. Marinade was lemon juice, zest, s/p, olive oil etc. I think I baked at 400 (I had another dish in the oven, so went with 400). Plus, I'm assuming a temp of 400, 375 etc helps vs using a lower temp.

    The skin didn't get that crispy (funny that I don't eat the skin, so shouldn't really matter -- but it just didn't look that good). I ended up broiling it for a bit to brown a little.

    So, what's the best way to get crispy, brown skin ---- pat it dry (which is what I did)? On the other hand, some drizzle with oil etc.

    Any suggestions would be great. Man if I only knew how my grandmother made her chicken -- best chicken ever. I know she used to rub with paprika etc. Don't start me on her roasted potatoes.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by applecrisp; 01-01-2011 at 06:09 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    19,680
    If I'm not the last American who eats chicken skin, I'm the last BBer who does - at least twice a month I bake a chicken with plenty o' sides for dinner, and the skin is always super crisp. I either dry it with paper towel and/or leave it on a plate in the 'fridge for an hour or two before preparing. I trim any excess fat and skin and then rub it with olive oil and season. These days it's always one of two rubs from Tyler Florence that I absolutely love, but in the past it was usually just thyme and kosher salt or, occasionally, oregano and paprika. Place on my broiling rack (I line the bottom with foil for easier clean-up) and bake at 375° for about 50 minutes.
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    SF 'burbs
    Posts
    1,212
    Here's a recipe from Cook's Country that gives a metnod for the crispy skin. Maybe it will help with your chicken pieces.
    Good luck!



    Crispy Roast Chicken and Potatoes
    Serves 4
    If you have it, a nonstick roasting pan works best here. If using a chicken larger than 4 pounds, the oven time will need to be lengthened slightly

    2 teaspoons cornstarch
    Table salt
    1 whole chicken (3 1/2 to 4 pounds), giblets discarded, skin patted dry with paper towels
    2 pounds small red potatoes , scrubbed and halved
    2 teaspoons vegetable oil


    1. Line roasting pan with foil, letting foil come up sides of pan. Adjust oven rack to middle position (8 to 10 inches from broiler element), place roasting pan on rack, and heat oven to 475 degrees. Coat V-rack with cooking spray.

    2. Combine cornstarch and 2 teaspoons salt in small bowl. Use skewer to poke holes all over chicken skin. Rub cornstarch mixture evenly over chicken.

    3. Remove roasting pan from oven. Place chicken, wing side up, in V-rack, then place V-rack in roasting pan (see photo 1). Roast chicken 15 minutes. Remove roasting pan from oven and, using wad of paper towels, flip chicken so that other wing is facing up. Roast 15 minutes.

    4. Meanwhile toss potatoes, oil, and 1/2 teaspoon salt in medium bowl. Remove roasting pan from oven and, with potholder, carefully transfer V-rack with chicken to rimmed baking sheet. Gather up foil by its corners, capturing any fat and juices, and discard. Arrange potatoes, cut side down, in roasting pan. Using wad of paper towels, flip chicken breast side up in V-rack. Place V-rack back in roasting pan (photo 2) and roast chicken until instant-read thermometer inserted into thickest part of thigh registers 170 degrees, about 20 minutes.

    5. Using wad of paper towels, remove chicken from V-rack and pour juices from cavity into roasting pan with potatoes. Place chicken on angel-food-cake pan insert or empty soda can to rest upright for 10 to 15 minutes. Meanwhile, toss potatoes in chicken juices (photo 3), return to oven, and cook until well browned and crisp, 10 to 15 minutes. Carve chicken and serve with potatoes.
    Jill

    "Be kind to your neighbor... he knows where you live." -Brian Copeland

  4. #4
    Canice, you are not alone. I love crispy chicken skin. I cook chicken pieces at 425 for right around 45 minutes and the skin is usually nice and crisp. I also dry the skin and just season it. I don't even bother with any oil or butter on the skin.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    19,680
    I've never really known whether the oil helps with crisping or not, but I do think it helps make the seasoning stick.
    If I'm not mistaken, Hammster, you are also a dark meat person? Between liking dark meat and eating the skin, I feel like I'm on fringes of acceptable chicken eating in America

    BTW, my post should have read "at least twice a month I bake a chicken LEG with plenty o' sides for dinner...." I may have some work to do on portion control, but I certainly don't eat "a chicken with plenty o' sides" for dinner. Ever, much less a couple of times a month!

    ETA, this thread is making me glad I have that little Cornish game hen in the 'fridge!!
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Heading WEST!!
    Posts
    15,359
    I always thought chicken skin was so-so till I tired that lemon chicken that was posted on the NPR segment in a different thread (Hazan's lemon chicken).
    I became addicted to chicken skin.
    I find it easier to get crisp skin doing a whole chicken than doing pieces, but I read a trick somewhere that is fairly easy and works fairly well....
    Spritz (like a spray bottle) the chicken skin with vinegar and then dry it off. Make sure to have the skin as dry as possible.
    salt/pepper .....YUM!
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  7. #7
    Thanks everyone.

    I'm thinking that maybe marinating it made the skin too wet (or the overall chicken was too wet from it) -- even with drying off the top.

    Canice and Hammster, maybe I should say I don't eat the skin on the chicken that I bake. Oh, maybe a taste. But when I used to eat my grandmother's chicken. Yep, I ate the skin. And, LOVED it. And, of course if I'm eating wings. I just typically buy boneless chicken (not really into the bones -- have definite veg tendencies. ) There's a fantastic restaurant in town that is famous for their roasted chicken -- not removing the skin on that little number.

    Oct2189 - Thanks for the recipe. I've never heard of using cornstarch.

    Wallycat -- Never heard of using vinegar either. Off to google the chicken recipe. I am huge fan of chicken and lemon.

    Thanks everyone.
    Last edited by applecrisp; 01-01-2011 at 07:25 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    1,452
    I roast chicken parts all the time and the skin gets very crispy. I just put it in the baking pan along and sprinkle with garlic powder and seasoned salt and bake at 425 degrees for around 1 hour and 15-30 minutes. The skin is really crispy and well seasoned and yummy. If you have a convection oven, it works even better...I roast on convection at 400 degrees for an hour. The skin is really crispy and the meat is juicy. I usually use 2 pans. One I put a couple of cans of whole potatoes, cut in half or quarters depending on the size of the potatoes and put a couple of legs in there. The other pan has just chicken. Sometimes I will baste the potatoes with chicken drippings from the other pan. Very yummy, crispy and unhealthy, I'm sure!

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Canice View Post
    If I'm not mistaken, Hammster, you are also a dark meat person? Between liking dark meat and eating the skin, I feel like I'm on fringes of acceptable chicken eating in America
    Yup, it's just you and me in the skin on, bone in, dark meat club, Canice. LOL. Totally a fan of dark meat.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Canice View Post
    If I'm not the last American who eats chicken skin, I'm the last BBer who does
    No, Canice and Hammster are the only ones who will admit to it! There is alsays a public self and a private self.
    The cardiologist's diet: - If it tastes good spit it out!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    19,680
    Quote Originally Posted by Hammster View Post
    Yup, it's just you and me in the skin on, bone in, dark meat club, Canice. LOL. Totally a fan of dark meat.
    Well, at least we get the better prices .
    This topic has me thinking about the fact that to my mind I cook almost exactly like my mother: if you had popped by for dinner tonight, I would have offered roasted game hen, mashed potatoes, stuffed whipped yams, sautéed chard, and pearl onions. (Uhm, not because that's what I ate, but because it's what I could have made). To me, I'm a super basic cook - and yet my mother found my meals nearly unrecognizable

    Quote Originally Posted by ADM View Post
    No, Canice and Hammster are the only ones who will admit to it! There is alsays a public self and a private self.
    lol, ADM! I dunno - no one seems to like dark meat, and I think that so many people grew up with boneless/skinless chicken that they would be truly disgusted by the notion of eating chicken skin. I was a teenager when the boneless/skinless chicken breast phenomenon struck (yes kids, it was a phenomenon) - seriously, it was a big deal!
    Since I never liked white meat anyhow, just drying it out further never really appealed to me, but I sure do remember a gazillion chicken recipes for weight loss back in the day.

    BTW: I did understand, AC, that you don't eat the skin - was just thinking about the broader question of how to make it crisp. And I think you're right about the marinade. Probably permeates the skin.
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  12. #12
    I'm going to pick up some chicken breasts and cook it sans marinade. I think that was the problem. I'm going to go old school and rub on a bit of oil and some paprika. And, might even try some roasted potatoes.

    My grandmothers potatoes were sooo good, that sometimes we would bring home leftovers that had potatoes in it, but somehow when it was time to eat dinner, the amount of potatoes would be way less. Hey, they were good cold, warm, hot, with the fridge door open.... no matter. Same with the stuffed cabbage.

    The recipes and other suggestions sound interesting --- so look forward to trying them too.

    Thanks everyone.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Heading WEST!!
    Posts
    15,359
    We almost never buy chicken breasts, unless they are attached to the whole chicken .

    We love dark meat so much, duck is my favorite poultry!
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Southeast, MA
    Posts
    2,305
    Quote Originally Posted by Hammster View Post
    Yup, it's just you and me in the skin on, bone in, dark meat club, Canice. LOL. Totally a fan of dark meat.
    No way guys, you're not alone, we are a trio!! The last (to admit it) on the CLBB!!

    I think like Hammster said, 425 is the key to the crispy skin. Sometimes my kitchen gets too smokey cooking it at this temp but I find if I do it for at least 15 minutes, I can turn it down to 375 for the rest of the cooking time with no ill effects.

    And if you REALLY want some crispy sinfully good skin without actually frying, my mom always makes the bone-in chicken breasts by shaking them in flour first, then sticking a pat of butter on each piece. Dash of salt & pepper, sometimes I add herbs de provence or cajun etc... so good!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Metrowest MA
    Posts
    1,947
    Quote Originally Posted by Hammster View Post
    Yup, it's just you and me in the skin on, bone in, dark meat club, Canice. LOL. Totally a fan of dark meat.
    Quote Originally Posted by Peweh View Post
    No way guys, you're not alone, we are a trio!! The last (to admit it) on the CLBB!!
    Move over, guys -- you need to make room for one more!!!
    ~ ~ Leslie ~ ~

  16. #16
    Applecrisp - I fix split breasts on a regular basis and have a variety of different ways to season them. We, too, love the lemon and chicken combo and crispy skin is a must.

    What I do is thinly slice a lemon and place several of the slices under the skin. If I have fresh rosemary, sage and thyme - I'll slide a leaf or stalk under there w/ the lemon. Otherwise, dried herbs get rubbed on top along w/ salt and pepper.

    The lemon flavors the chicken w/out having to marinate.

    As a kid I thought my older sister was nuts for only eating the white meat! My brother and I fought over the dark. Now I'm wise enough to be able to enjoy them both.
    "I can read and write if that's what you mean. I'm not thick or anything just don't ask me where the commas go."
    Incendiary by Chris Cleave

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    In
    Posts
    5,896
    Quote Originally Posted by syzygy View Post
    Move over, guys -- you need to make room for one more!!!
    Don't forget me! I just ate 2 drumsticks for breakfast from the Colonel.

  18. #18
    I wanna be in the club, too!!

    My son says there is no need for chickens to have breasts--they are not mammals. They should just be legs, thighs, wings and backs.

    I raise my own chicken, and I do have trouble even with those chicken breasts. They have better flavor than store bought, but are still too dry.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    SO. CA
    Posts
    2,227

    Wink

    My mouth is watering! I am going to Vons now going to get some FosterFarms whole body chickens .77cents per #!!!
    Curleytop

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by sparrowgrass View Post
    I wanna be in the club, too!!
    Welcome to the club!


    Quote Originally Posted by sparrowgrass View Post
    My son says there is no need for chickens to have breasts--they are not mammals. They should just be legs, thighs, wings and backs.
    Well, technically they don't have breasts. I guess chicken pectorals just don't sound as appetizing. LOL.

    I also enjoy a properly cooked breast, but it seems about the only place I can find one is here at my house.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    In
    Posts
    5,896
    Too funny sparrowgrass! Maybe 2011 is the year of confessions on a healthy eating board. Wonder what we could find out?

  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by vbak View Post
    Too funny sparrowgrass! Maybe 2011 is the year of confessions on a healthy eating board. Wonder what we could find out?
    Ah, yes...a CLBB "True Confessions" thread!

    "Hi, my name is ____, I ate a tasty jello salad, and I didn't gag!"

    "I make better hotdogs than the ones they serve at the ballgames!"

    "I made that recipe, as written, and didn't reduce the oil from two tablespoons to one-half teaspoon."

    "I love to bake and there is no way I am going to send all but one bite to my husband's office!"
    The cardiologist's diet: - If it tastes good spit it out!

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    19,680
    Quote Originally Posted by sparrowgrass View Post
    I wanna be in the club, too!!

    My son says there is no need for chickens to have breasts--they are not mammals. They should just be legs, thighs, wings and backs.

    I raise my own chicken, and I do have trouble even with those chicken breasts. They have better flavor than store bought, but are still too dry.
    I like your son!
    I am also envious that you have such great fresh chicken literally in your own back yard.

    Quote Originally Posted by vbak View Post
    Too funny sparrowgrass! Maybe 2011 is the year of confessions on a healthy eating board. Wonder what we could find out?
    Well, I could post about the pasta sauce I make, oh, easily once a week. Hint: bacon and half-and-half.
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Southeast, MA
    Posts
    2,305
    Quote Originally Posted by Canice View Post
    Well, I could post about the pasta sauce I make, oh, easily once a week. Hint: bacon and half-and-half.
    Oh, Please Do!! Sounds delicious.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    19,680
    Ugh, it's almost criminal. No recipe, but here's what I do:

    Cook two slices of chopped bacon in a nonstick pan. Set aside to drain on paper towels, and wipe out pan.

    Sweat a pile of garlic in a little butter and olive oil in same pan. Add a few splashes of half-and-half and a good bit of fresh lemon zest and the reserved bacon. If you have some prawns in the freezer (that you've thawed) chop 'em in chunks and add now. Also a good time to add any washed and chopped mushrooms you have on hand. Or peas straight from the freezer. Stir well and reduce sauce slightly.
    Cook pasta (cappellini or orzo) and reserve a bit of cooking water in case you need it to thin sauce. Drain pasta (if you have some fresh spinach on hand, pour the pasta over that to wilt). Mix the pasta and sauce and stir in red pepper flakes and Parmesan cheese. If you have any on hand, definitely add a big old handful of chopped fresh parsley, too.

    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Southeast, MA
    Posts
    2,305
    Quote Originally Posted by Canice View Post
    Ugh, it's almost criminal. No recipe, but here's what I do:

    Sounds divine!! Thanks for sharing, Canice!!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •