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Thread: Diabetic Exchange List Question

  1. #1

    Diabetic Exchange List Question

    I was reading my friend Mary's menu list which says that 1 meat portion is 1 ounce. Two portions are allowed for her dinner. One ounce is 1 tablespoon (approximately 2 bites).

    My question is - How does a person living alone, learn to shop for and cook 4 bites of meat?
    The cardiologist's diet: - If it tastes good spit it out!

  2. #2
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    Many hospitals offer diabetic "classes" and some include learning to cook/pick meals.
    I don't think anyone would suggest cooking a 4-bite portion.
    Rather, they would make a small amount of meat and cut the portion off they require for that meal time. Either freezing or refrigerating for leftovers is considered acceptable.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by wallycat View Post
    Many hospitals offer diabetic "classes" and some include learning to cook/pick meals. I don't think anyone would suggest cooking a 4-bite portion. Rather, they would make a small amount of meat and cut the portion off they require for that meal time. Either freezing or refrigerating for leftovers is considered acceptable.
    I don't think classes are necessary since she has the diet list and is a good cook who sees no problem except for buying and cooking meat.

    Easily measurable meat portions such as one hotdog, one small link bratwurst or a couple of slices of bacon would be OK on occasion, but are not too healthy if eaten frequently.

    Cooking one meat patty (steak, chop or whatever) eating 4 bites then refrigerating or freezing the remainder sounds pretty gross, since the next meal would always taste leftover, frozen, or overcooked.

    I don't know what to tell her. She laughed when said she was going to eat nothing but Free Exchange foods, but I think she was serious.
    The cardiologist's diet: - If it tastes good spit it out!

  4. #4
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    Of course everyone has food preferences and likes/dislikes and a method to how they prepare and enjoy their food. She will need to find what works for her.

    Other suggestions are:
    1. If you buy ground meat, portion and weigh it out BEFORE cooking, then freeze in serving sizes and cook as needed.
    2. If buying steak, partial freezing makes it easier to cut and then freeze in portion sizes.
    3. Scallops/shrimp are easily portioned out and can be frozen.
    4. Making casseroles, meatloaf, etc. and then freezing in portion sizes.
    5. Chicken breasts can also be partially frozen, cut into portion sizes and frozen/thawed as needed.
    6. Most grocers would gladly fillet and cut fish into any portions requested.
    7. Pork loin, same thing...I bought a ginormous pork loin on sale and had the butcher cut it into 4 chop portions and wrap in butcher paper each 4 pack.

    I am sorry if the previous suggestions did not appeal to you; they may appeal to her. MANY people love leftovers and to think leaving a portion of meat in the refrigerator for a day or so and then eating it is unpleasant is not distasteful to everyone.
    I realize there are people who absolutely refuse and hate leftovers, but not everyone does; when I counseled patients, I always asked how they typically eat and what they enjoyed because no matter what I could suggest, they won't do it unless they like it.

    Simply because hot dogs and brats are "portioned" off does not mean other meat cannot be cut and portioned as well. Classes may show her how some of this works. It may simply help her think "outside the box" of how she is accustomed to cooking.
    Change is scary but do-able and trying new things till you fall into a pattern that is do-able and tasty takes time.

    I wish her well.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  5. #5
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    I agree with Wallycat, I often, in fact more often than not, eat leftovers including meat as a single woman living alone. I don't consider it "gross" at all. I rarely make a steak but if I did in this situation I would eat it as a steak on night one then on subsequent nights I'd do a steak salad, maybe a steak taco or do a steak/bean/tomato/corn mixture. Same idea with chicken.


    "Life isn't about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself" ~ George Bernard Shaw


  6. #6
    Wallycat and Robyn - I'm really NOT trying to be obtuse, and please don't think we don't appreciate your suggestions.

    1. If you buy ground meat, portion and weigh it out BEFORE cooking, then freeze in serving sizes and cook as needed.
    [Except for broiling how would you cook 2 tablespoons ground beef?]

    2. If buying steak, partial freezing makes it easier to cut and then freeze in portion sizes.

    3. Scallops/shrimp are easily portioned out and can be frozen.
    [We have several of her favorite recipes, using shrimp.]

    4. Making casseroles, meatloaf, etc. and then freezing in portion sizes.
    [We hadn't thought of 4 bites of meatloaf. Don't most casseroles involve pasta, which she needs to avoid.]

    5. Chicken breasts can also be partially frozen, cut into portion sizes and frozen/thawed as needed.

    6. Most grocers would gladly fillet and cut fish into any portions requested.
    [For some reason we hadn't thought beyond the tuna listed on her diet sheet.]

    7. Pork loin, same thing...I bought a ginormous pork loin on sale and had the butcher cut it into 4 chop portions and wrap in butcher paper each 4 pack.

    Maybe we haven't been able to see the forest because of the trees!

    Instead of concentrating on the idea of 4 bites of meat in the middle of a plate (doesn't that sound pitiful?) - maybe we actually need to find some recipes that don't use much meat.
    The cardiologist's diet: - If it tastes good spit it out!

  7. #7
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    You are not being obtuse

    When I started going low-carb, cooking became a challenge. Now I can do things with ease, but I gave myself time to adjust.

    Cooking 2 TBS of beef is easy in a small skillet, or mixed in with something.

    Casseroles don't need to be pasta based. They can be veggie based.

    My only addition to the 4 bites of meat is they must be wanting her to lose weight. Meat has minimal carbs and will rarely elevate blood sugar. In theory, she could eat a bunless burger as huge as the state of texas, skip the ketchup and onion and barely budge her glucose.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by wallycat View Post
    My only addition to the 4 bites of meat is they must be wanting her to lose weight.
    Yes, losing some weight is part of helping her to stay pre-diabetic. If she loses the weight is it possible that she will get a new list? (That would make her happy! )
    The cardiologist's diet: - If it tastes good spit it out!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ADM View Post
    Yes, losing some weight is part of helping her to stay pre-diabetic. If she loses the weight is it possible that she will get a new list? (That would make her happy! )
    Some people become prediabetic because of weight; others have genetics play into it and can be skinny and still see their numbers creep up.
    Carb counting makes the most sense to me and frankly, I would not be monitoring the meat....portions that are normal, yes, but meat counted to 4 bites...not so much.

    The less insulin the body requires (aka: low carbing), the longer the pancreas can resist fizzling out, so again, for me, I monitor the carbs I eat and try to eat reasonable portions. Lots of low-carb veggies and limited carbed veggies. I just eyeball my meat.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

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