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Thread: What's for dinner tonight?

  1. #31
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    Ya know, I bought some Rosemary last spring and it was like a creeper-a low grower. Other years the Rosemary I have bought has been upright and sturdy looking. Maybe that's the difference?

  2. #32
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    Those Greek style kebabs sound delicious. I have some ground turkey in the freezer that would be perfect for that.

    As an aside, I just finished eating my beet and goat cheese strudel served on creamed leeks. I made up the recipe, and not wanting to pat myself on the back, it was really really yummy! I was pleasantly surprised and would definitely make it again. If anyone has beets in the freezer, I would definitely recommend it!

  3. #33
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    Beets in the freezer? I have never thought to do that! Are they cooked/roasted first?

  4. #34
    I toasted slices of a French baguette that I brushed with a mixture of olive oil, garlic powder and a pinch of sea salt. I then topped it with Brie. I also had some strawberries and a glass of red wine. Sometimes, the simple dinners are the most satisfying.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne View Post
    It is a rosemary plant that was bred to grow long straight (upright) branches. I'ts official name is something along the lines of 'Rosemary officionalis barbeque'. It imparts a wonderful flavor to kebabs and you can use most of the leaves you strip off for other dishes. I bought a plant last summer and have been quite pleased that it has stayed alive and growing on my windowsill.
    That's curious: I looked at images on Google and it looks like all culinary rosemary I've ever seen - I wonder if it's a particular sub-type? (I always thought creeping rosemary was ornamental rather than culinary.) I miss having rosemary just outside the door
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canice View Post
    (I always thought creeping rosemary was ornamental rather than culinary.) I miss having rosemary just outside the door
    I've seen quite the collection of both upright and creeping styles of rosemary sold for herb use (High Country Gardens in New Mexico has an amazing array...) I'm guessing the barbecue variety was cultivated for long, straight, woody stems that hold up to "kebab-ery".

    I have to laugh at the comment about missing rosemary just outside the door. At both our previous home and this one we've had a single rosemary "shrub" as part of our evergreen landscaping (and for cooking). At this house it hides the electric and gas meters, and I imagine the meter reader gets quite fragrant as the season goes on. Each year it grows to a 4 foot high by 6 foot wide monster and we take the hedge trimmer to it, whacking it down to a little 2 foot ball. Tomorrow is whacking day

    Michelle

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkc View Post
    I have to laugh at the comment about missing rosemary just outside the door. At both our previous home and this one we've had a single rosemary "shrub" as part of our evergreen landscaping (and for cooking). At this house it hides the electric and gas meters, and I imagine the meter reader gets quite fragrant as the season goes on. Each year it grows to a 4 foot high by 6 foot wide monster and we take the hedge trimmer to it, whacking it down to a little 2 foot ball. Tomorrow is whacking day

    Michelle
    That was us! We planted one or two lone plants and then my mother said the one I'd given her was "dead" - it was about 20" high and 12" around and almost entirely brown, but for a few green sprigs. I planted it along a fence with the two healthy ones, and within a few months we had a huge, fragrant hedge of it, all along the fence! The dog used to run by the fence to chase raccoons away, and when she ran back into the house, the whole room would smell of rosemary - aromatherapy dog
    I honestly felt choked up when the gardeners came and ripped it out: it was beautifully green and lush and fragrant - probably 25 feet long and four feet high and my favorite part of the garden to water.
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  8. #38
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    I made Perfect Roast Chicken, a recipe by Ina Garten. The chicken was so moist and I loved the roasted fennel in place of potatoes. Will absolutely make it again.

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/i...ipe/index.html
    "Auntie, you are a good cooker." ~ My nephew, age 5

  9. #39
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    vbak,
    I roasted the beets first. Washed and trimmed the beets, then placed them whole in my LC with the lid on. In the oven for 45 minutes or so. Very easy and they turned out great. I packaged them in serving sizes for the freezer using my foodsaver.

    Nancy

  10. #40
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    Barbeque rosemary probably originated by someone finding a few of the more upright plants among regular rosemary and specifically propogating them for a few generations. It's been a few years since I overwintered rosemary inside but this bbq version seems to have straighter and stronger stems and less side branching. I don't notice a difference in flavor. The rosemary in my garden (standard rosemary grown from seed every year - does not overwinter) definitely has a lot more sidewise action and does not have the really long straight stem. I'm not sure how much of that is due to being outside in a garden vs inside in a pot as opposed to the difference in the varieties.

    When my folks were still alive we used to visit them in the desert in winter. I can remember being very impressed by the rosemary shrubs growing around their yard.
    Anne

  11. #41
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    Leftovers -- Baked Ziti by ADM! Ash Wednesday service at 5, then choir rehearsal after, so either a really early dinner, or a really late one... or 2 snacks!

    I can relate to the Rosemary tales -- had one at the other house and used it, until I saw one of the dogs "water" it -- started taking sprigs off the top, then. I need one here to hide the trash can... which is not in the dog area!
    Kay
    I'm a WYSIWYG person -- no subterfuge here!

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea_2 View Post
    I looked on the Cook's Illustrated website, and the Cincinnati Chili recipe posted there appears to be the one that Swedish Cook posted the link for. I used a Cook's Illustrated "Soups & Stews" magazine though, and the recipe is a bit different.

    The magazine version didn't list any toppings in the directions, so I didn't buy those since I didn't see them. I ended up just chopping up some onions, and using some Monterey Jack cheese from the fridge. I did make some spaghetti, but didn't use butter. It didn't need it. We really liked this recipe! Now I'm curious to try the online version though.

    Here is the one I made:

    Cincinnati Chili

    1 tablespoon vegetable oil
    2 medium onions, chopped fine
    1 medium garlic clove, minced or pressed through garlic press (about 1 teaspoon)
    2 tablespoons tomato paste
    2 tablespoons chili powder
    1 tablespoon dried oregano
    1½ teaspoons ground cinnamon
    Table salt
    ¾ teaspoon black pepper
    ¼ teaspoon ground allspice
    2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
    2 cups canned tomato sauce
    2 tablespoons cider vinegar
    2 teaspoons dark brown sugar
    1½ pounds 85 percent lean ground beef

    Heat oil in Dutch oven over medium-high heat until shimmering. Cook onions until soft and browned around edges, about 8 minutes. Add garlic, tomato paste, chili powder, oregano, cinnamon, 1 teaspoon salt, pepper, and allspice and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Stir in broth, tomato sauce, vinegar, and sugar.

    Add beef and stir to break up meat. Bring to boil, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer until chili is deep brown and slightly thickened, 15 to 20 minutes. Season with salt and serve with spaghetti, cheese, onions and/or kidney beans. (Chili can be refrigerated in airtight container for up to 3 days or frozen for up to 2 months.)
    Thank you Andrea for posting this recipe

    Tonight's dinner is Red Snapper Veracruz Style with rice. It was posted by greta in 2003. I have never prepared red snapper before, but with 114 reviews this BA recipe must be good.
    We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made.
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  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by swedish cook View Post
    Thank you Andrea for posting this recipe

    Tonight's dinner is Red Snapper Veracruz Style with rice. It was posted by greta in 2003. I have never prepared red snapper before, but with 114 reviews this BA recipe must be good.
    Hi swedish cook, your recipe calls for garlic. You could use it to play this weeks game.

  14. #44
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    My DH and I are also going to Ash Wednesday services at 6:00 p.m. today, and since we live a long way from town, it will be 7:30 p.m. or later when we get home. We have all kinds of sandwich stuff, plus homemade bread, so that will make an easy and quick supper. I'd love to be a dinner guest at several of your houses tonight, though.

    Denise
    "If you're lucky enough to live in the mountains, you're lucky enough."

  15. #45
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    Since Ash Wednesday=no meat, I am making salmon baked in a creamy dill sauce with pasta. Salad? Asparagus? It's 7:19 and I'm adding ???marks to my menu? Oi vay. Busy doing school work.

  16. #46
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    How funny, I cook beef just a couple of times a year and tonight it's steak night! With chimichurri sauce (I had a LOT of herbs in the crisper) and a salad from some beautiful tiny heads of lettuce I picked up at a farm stand.
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  17. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by vbak View Post
    And here's another one from Kalyn's Kitchen.

    Twice Baked Cauliflower
    (Makes 6-8 servings; recipe adapted slightly from The Low Carb Gourmet.)

    Ingredients:
    1 large head cauliflower
    4 oz. low fat cream cheese (do not use fat free)
    1/2 cup low fat sour cream (do not use fat free)
    1/4 cup minced green onions
    1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese (If you only have finely grated Parmesan, use a bit less)
    6 slices bacon, cooked until very crisp, fat blotted with paper towel and then crumbled
    1 cup reduced fat sharp cheddar cheese
    (I used Kraft 2% milk sharp cheddar)

    Instructions:
    Preheat oven to 350F/180C. Cut out stem and core from cauliflower, and cut into small pieces. Cook in large pot of boiling salted water until cauliflower is tender, but not overly soft. Drain well and mash with potato masher, leaving some chunks. Mix in light cream cheese, light sour cream, green onion, Parmesan, and 3/4 of the crumbled bacon.

    Spread evenly in a medium-sized glass casserole dish. Sprinkle with low-fat cheddar cheese and reserved bacon. Bake 30-35 minutes, or until hot and bubbly.


    P
    I made this on Sunday and heated up a (rather large!) serving last night, with meatloaf. This is OMG-good!! A total keeper! And great to bring to contribute to a meal, as it doesn't have all the "issues" mashed potatoes do. It also doesn't feel as heavy as either mashed potatoes or cauliflower gratin - sort of the best of both.
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  18. #48
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    Canine and vbak, that sounds delicious and on my menu later this week. Yum!

    Tonight I'm making baked haddock with lobster stuffing and green beans on the side. Added bonus of catching the haddock and lobster off the NH coast this past summer, and beans from my garden, so I'm emptying my freezer at the same time! Yeah!

    Only 36 lbs of lobster and 14 lbs of haddock to go!

  19. #49
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    What time is dinner?I'm coming over-RIGHT NOW! Only 36lbs of lobster to go. Wow! Sounds fabulous!

  20. #50
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    Glad you enjoyed it, Canice. I've been making mashed cauliflower at least once a week.

  21. #51
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    It was a lot of messy smelly work! I tried post a photo of me holding a couple of small lobsterS on the boat, but I guess I don't know how.

    Anyway, come on over! Northern edge of the white mountains of NH! Beautiful alpine glow on the mtns right now!

  22. #52
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    It's 5:00, and I have finally settled on dinner. It's an eastern European casserole of sorts, with sliced boiled potatoes, sliced hard boiled eggs, sliced smoked Polish sausage, butter, sour cream, s&p. Layer and bake at 350 til bubbly. Absolute comfort food for me/us. Maybe I'll make something green to go with it!

  23. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by doglady8 View Post
    It was a lot of messy smelly work! I tried post a photo of me holding a couple of small lobsterS on the boat, but I guess I don't know how.

    Anyway, come on over! Northern edge of the white mountains of NH! Beautiful alpine glow on the mtns right now!
    Too bad the photos didn't show up. So, you ate dinner without us? Sounds like a lovely dinner. Hope you enjoyed.

  24. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by vbak View Post
    It's 5:00, and I have finally settled on dinner. It's an eastern European casserole of sorts, with sliced boiled potatoes, sliced hard boiled eggs, sliced smoked Polish sausage, butter, sour cream, s&p. Layer and bake at 350 til bubbly. Absolute comfort food for me/us. Maybe I'll make something green to go with it!
    The casserole sounds wonderful! As a green side dish, may I suggest Steam-Sautéed Green Beans with Almonds and Parsley. Had a package of haricots verts that needed to be used. This was quick and great with last night's dinner of leftovers.
    We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made.
    -M. Acklam

  25. #55
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    Thanks for the recipe.It sounds deelish. No fresh parsley on hand, but maybe I can wing it with dried?

  26. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canice View Post
    That was us! We planted one or two lone plants and then my mother said the one I'd given her was "dead" - it was about 20" high and 12" around and almost entirely brown, but for a few green sprigs. I planted it along a fence with the two healthy ones, and within a few months we had a huge, fragrant hedge of it, all along the fence! The dog used to run by the fence to chase raccoons away, and when she ran back into the house, the whole room would smell of rosemary - aromatherapy dog
    I honestly felt choked up when the gardeners came and ripped it out: it was beautifully green and lush and fragrant - probably 25 feet long and four feet high and my favorite part of the garden to water.
    That must have been so cool! What part of the country was this?

  27. #57
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    It was cool! And it was so lush and healthy every day of the year. This was in San Francisco, at ex-DBF's house; he lives by the beach, in a neighborhood built on sanddunes, so if you dig down in the soil more than a few inches...sand. As I learned, rosemary LOVES bad soil and we had in the chalky old stuff that hadn't been replenished probably since the house was built in 1939.
    Eventually he wanted to do something different and had the gardeners pull it all out...made me sooooo sad.
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  28. #58
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    I asked DH what he wanted for dinner, and he said "Tuscan chicken".

    I didn't have the ingredients for what I usually do as "Tuscan chicken" (new potatoes, bone-in thighs), so I Googed and found this recipe, which is 2 removed from a Cooking Light recipe. I removed it one more degree (hey, at least it had Bacon in it ) and used 1/2 pound of Rancho Gordo baby limas (which I cooked with garlic and a bay leaf) in place of the cannelini. Used only 2 chicken breasts, halved thickness-wise to make 4 pieces. Loved it! Best of all, we have a full meal of leftovers thanks to the extra beans.

    Michelle

  29. #59
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    Sounds very tasty, Michelle! I had never eaten a lima bean in my life (they need a better PR agent) til I bought first a bag of those crazy giant ones from RG, and then a bag of the nice, small ones. I used them in several dishes and they were really nice - nothing like what I'd expected from all the bad sitcoms and comics.
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  30. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Canice View Post
    Sounds very tasty, Michelle! I had never eaten a lima bean in my life (they need a better PR agent) til I bought first a bag of those crazy giant ones from RG, and then a bag of the nice, small ones. I used them in several dishes and they were really nice - nothing like what I'd expected from all the bad sitcoms and comics.
    I agree they need better PR. I think size is the difference. Lets the rest of the flavors surround a smaller bland mouthful. I never ate them till I made that typical BBQ beans recipe .

    Years ago my husband was visiting an aunt for a week. His mom had taught him to be polite at the table so when lima beans were served he lied through his teeth and said they were great. Auntie served them every day for the week to please him.

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