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Thread: overnight oats

  1. #1
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    overnight oats

    We have steel-cut oats most mornings, and my routine is to bring it to a boil, then cover, turn it off and let it sit until we're ready for breakfast-- at least 20 minutes though. Then I add whatever fruit and nuts I want and reheat.

    I was just wondering.. any reason I can't do this the night before and just leave it on the stove, then reheat in the morning with the fruit and nuts? I'm just thinking of food safety. Would I need to simmer it for a particular length of time do you think?

  2. #2
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    I boil my oats the night before then add toppings in the morning when I re-heat. Been doing this for years and I haven't gotten sick.

    I bring my oats to a boil, cover, turn off the heat and walk away. I do try and do this about 9p or so; I start re-heating at about 615am. We eat anywhere between 740 and 750am. I also add a bit of milk when re-heating to make them creamy again and if the husband is being particularly slow, then I'll turn of and let stand until he's out of the shower.

    Definitely saves time in the morning and I think I get a better pot of oats.
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  3. #3
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    If you are doing it with water, then go ahead and let it sit overnight.

    If you choose to cook them in milk, then follow the same process, but let them cool down slightly, cover and set them in the fridge. You get mostly the same result, but you may need to heat them for an extra minute or two the next morning!
    Joe

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  4. #4
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    Thanks very much! I just use water so I'll start doing it this way tonight.

  5. #5
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    Sounds like you have a plan, but if you are looking for an alternative, this recipe is GREAT... for Apple Steel Cut Oats overnight in the crockpot....

    http://www.theyummylife.com/blog/201...el-Cut+Oatmeal
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  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by RiverFarm View Post
    I have tried crockpot oatmeal in the past and found that it was almost impossible to clean the liner afterwards, so any time that I saved on the cooking was totally lost on the washing up! The oatmeal I use only cooks for about five minutes anyway.
    Have you ever tried the crockpot liners?

  7. #7
    I have done this a lot. Usually I microwave them in the morning and add fresh fruits. They are ready in minutes

  8. #8
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    A slightly different strategy. I sometimes make a baked oatmeal dish (using old fashioned oats rather than steel cut). Lately, I've made double quantity and freeze the remainder. It thaws and reheats quickly.

    Kay

  9. #9
    Here's a blog post with good tips on making a week's worth of oatmeal:

    http://www.thekitchn.com/oatmeal-in-...of-stee-143623

  10. #10
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    Got addicted to steel cut oats about a year ago. The night before I bring water to a boil, add the oats and simmer, uncovered, for one minute. (I can tidy the kitchen while I wait for the water to start boiling.) Remove from heat, cover, and next morning simmer for 8-10 minutes, adding raisins the last 5 minutes. Serve with 1% milk.
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  11. #11
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    Thanks for all the tips and recipes. I just saw these additional posts, but in the meantime I've just been bringing the oats to a boil while I put the dishes away before bed, then let it sit covered until morning. Works perfectly. I just add whatever fruit, return it slowly to simmer and serve with milk. Cleanup is easy also! Much less problem with the oats sticking to the bottom.

  12. I always prepare my breakfast oats the night before because I like to sleep a few minutes longer in the morning, hehe. I just re-heat it, add fresh fruit and a bit of honey and I'm done.

  13. #13
    Since its getting warmer down here in the south I've switched from eating oatmeal to muesli. The other week I found a recipe for steel cut oats muesli. You just add 2 cups of milk to 1 cup of oats and leave it in the fridge overnight. I did this last night...they were good this morning, but still a little chewy. I'm new to using steel cut oats (only discovered them a couple of weeks ago at the local store), so is this normal, or do they need to soak longer than 8-10 hours?

  14. #14
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    I'm not sure if this is any help. I soak almost all my grains overnight before eating or cooking them if I can remember to do it. The oats and wheat berries come out chewy but I don't mind that. Sometimes I soak/keep moist long enough to sprout and they don't seem to get less chewy in the process. When I strain yoghurt to make yo-cheese I use the fluids from that because I read that that combo yields more nutrients the human body can use. Maybe someone with more knowlege can clarify this.
    Anne

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by JSadler View Post
    Since its getting warmer down here in the south I've switched from eating oatmeal to muesli. The other week I found a recipe for steel cut oats muesli. You just add 2 cups of milk to 1 cup of oats and leave it in the fridge overnight. I did this last night...they were good this morning, but still a little chewy. I'm new to using steel cut oats (only discovered them a couple of weeks ago at the local store), so is this normal, or do they need to soak longer than 8-10 hours?
    I've had regular oats this way and it was really good, but I've never had it with the steel cut. I'll be interested too to see if others have any experience with this.

  16. #16
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    I have never seen the steel-cut oat muesli suggestion and will have to try that. I am a big fan of steel-cut oats.

    For the OP: I don't know how many you are feeding, or if this suggestion will work for you, but I will throw it out there. I eat steel-cut oatmeal for breakfast most mornings, but do not wish to cook it (and wash the pot) every day. What I do instead is to cook a large pot of it, refrigerate the leftovers, and then reheat a portion every morning in the microwave. The proportions that work best for me for cooking the steel-cut oats are one part oats to four parts water, plus salt. For just myself, I cook one and a half cups of steel-cut oats in six cups of water plus a handful of kosher salt. I use my Dutch oven as this works best for me. I eat what I want for breakfast that day and usually have about a quart leftover, which will last me 6-8 days.

    I have noted that sometimes my steel-cut oats cook a little faster, and sometimes a little longer. I'm not sure if this is my cooking method or the age of the oats or something else. I buy them from the bulk bin at Whole Foods, where they seem to have a good turnover.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Kyra View Post
    For just myself, I cook one and a half cups of steel-cut oats in six cups of water plus a handful of kosher salt.
    Have you ever actually measured "a handful of kosher salt"?
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  18. #18
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    If it reassures you, I have small hands. I will go and check!

    I measured and it was just less than a tablespoon. I doubt that's excessive for six cups of water. I find oats of any kind to be bland unless they are salted.

  19. #19
    I make overnight cold oats a few times a week...i love them! I got the idea from the blog ohsheglows.com. I always prepare them the night before. I made them using steel cut oats the other day instead of my rolled oats and sadly did not like them. It was way to hard and chewy for my taste. I even let them sit in the fridge for another day to see if they would soften, but sadly they did not.

    My favorite way to prepare overnight oats is in a peanut butter jar that has just been used up b/c there is enough PB in there to make the oats so yummy!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyra View Post
    I have never seen the steel-cut oat muesli suggestion and will have to try that. I am a big fan of steel-cut oats.

    For the OP: I don't know how many you are feeding, or if this suggestion will work for you, but I will throw it out there. I eat steel-cut oatmeal for breakfast most mornings, but do not wish to cook it (and wash the pot) every day. What I do instead is to cook a large pot of it, refrigerate the leftovers, and then reheat a portion every morning in the microwave. The proportions that work best for me for cooking the steel-cut oats are one part oats to four parts water, plus salt. For just myself, I cook one and a half cups of steel-cut oats in six cups of water plus a handful of kosher salt. I use my Dutch oven as this works best for me. I eat what I want for breakfast that day and usually have about a quart leftover, which will last me 6-8 days.

    I have noted that sometimes my steel-cut oats cook a little faster, and sometimes a little longer. I'm not sure if this is my cooking method or the age of the oats or something else. I buy them from the bulk bin at Whole Foods, where they seem to have a good turnover.
    Funny you posted this because I had a friend suggest the same thing yesterday as it is how he does it at home. I have a question though. I don't like doing regular oatmeal this way because it gets so sticky and lumpy. How do steel cut oats compare? Are they a similar consistency coming from the frig and reheated to when they are first cooked? I like the idea of not having to wash the pan every morning.

  21. #21
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    Well, I will be honest and say that I think the texture of the cooked steel-cut oats is best when they are freshly made, as in the second they reach the consistency I like best. However, I think the texture suffers only a little bit from refrigerating and reheating. Certainly it's a little different, but it doesn't turn into wallpaper paste the way regular rolled oats can. I would advise you to give it a try and see what you think; if you don't care for the consistency, the leftover cooked oats can be added to bread dough or muffin batter or something. I think I have also read somewhere that you can freeze the cooked steel-cut oats, but I've never tried that. This could be another possibility for you. I am all in favor of less pot washing! Hope this helps.

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