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Thread: Burning a DVD to a Mac

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
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    Vancouver Island, BC, Canada
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    Burning a DVD to a Mac

    I have a lot of exercise DVDs, like Cathe, that I would like to burn on my Mac and be able to have all of them, ready to do, on my MacBook.

    I am new to the Mac word and does not know how to do it.

    Would anyone help? Thanks in advance.
    Helene

    ''In cooking, as in all the arts, simplicity is the sign of perfection.''
    -Curnonsky


    My Blog: La Cuisine d'Helene

    Twitter: @lacuisinehelene

  2. #2
    It depends on whether the content is locked as some DVD's have locked content and you need software to unlock.

    If the content is not locked, I think you just load and then "OPEN" from within itunes which handles all digital content - movies, music, books etc.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    It's DVD I bought and own. How do I find out if it is locked?
    Helene

    ''In cooking, as in all the arts, simplicity is the sign of perfection.''
    -Curnonsky


    My Blog: La Cuisine d'Helene

    Twitter: @lacuisinehelene

  4. #4
    I would start by putting it in and seeing if you can copy the content.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Oklahoma
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    My guess is that your DVD is DRMed.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
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    Madison, WI USA
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    Just b/c you bought it doesn't mean they let you burn multiple copies onto discs or devices.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by SusanMac View Post
    Just b/c you bought it doesn't mean they let you burn multiple copies onto discs or devices.
    Legally you are allowed to make copies of items you own for personal use. The SONY case was decided by the Supreme Court years ago and acknowledged the right of people to tape programming for their personal use. Even software acknowledges the right to make back up copies of applications for personal use.

    However, many suppliers of DVD's have locked the DVD's to prevent any copies being made which is kind of ridiculous in my opinion. Anyone with nefarious intents knows how to get rid of the locks and anyone who doesn't probably means to use it the way the OP did - as a more convenient means of accessing content already owned by the person.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
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    Thanks for clarifying! I do that all the time with CDs and don't think twice about it. Have never done it with a DVD

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by SusanMac View Post
    Thanks for clarifying! I do that all the time with CDs and don't think twice about it. Have never done it with a DVD
    Same principle for music and some of the record labels tried to lock the CD's for a brief period after they were deluged by file sharing but they received a tremendous amount of blowback from consumers who were incensed that they couldn't copy music onto their computers. I got one album like that awhile back which teed me off.

    Software applications attempt to get around the "first sale" doctrine by only granting a license which is that screen that comes down and is clicked and ignored by everyone but even software companies acknowledge the right of their "licensees" to make backup copies and even to have the software on two devices so long (theoretically) that the devices are not in use at the same time - clearest example would be if I own a laptop and desktop with a copy of Office on each one.

    ETA: Of course the book publishing industry is attempting to prevent any kind of sharing of their products and has even gone so far as trying to force libraries to limit the number of times a digital copy can be lent - which is ridiculous in my opinion since a library purchases a book - digital or paper - and it lends it out to one person at a time. Some books in my library are 40 or 50 years old and can be rebound so long as they have some kind of interest to borrowers.

    One of my issues with digital books is that they have no useful life at all after one has finished reading them. With only a few exceptions, I can't lend them, sell them or donate them. Of course, the hackers have gone around this and managed to unlock their Kindle, itunes and Nook books so that they can be freely shared.

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