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Thread: Peanut allergy

  1. #1
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    Peanut allergy

    My baby (turned 1 year old 2 weeks ago) has a peanut allergy! I'm at a complete flippin loss on what to do. The more I read the more is scares the hell out of me! I have an appointment with an allergist next week and I'm sure that will point me in the direction I need to be going in. For now I got rid of all the peanut that I know of in my house (it all the hidden stuff in ingredients that scares me) and I have an EpiPen.

    UGH just banging my head on my keyboard right now!!!!

    If anyone has been in my shoes I'd love to hear from you!
    Stay-at-home mom scratch cooking for a child with a severe peanut and mustard allergy.

  2. #2
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    I'm sorry. My daughter has allergies too (gluten).

    Not really the same in that we don't have to carry an EpiPen or anything like that, but I know how frustrating it can be wondering about every hidden ingredient.

    Hang in there!

  3. #3
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    Do you know how severe of an allergy?

    My son is allergic to peanuts but its a mild allergy and can cause asthma and eczema. We didn't even realize it until we got him tested but he's been so much healthier since we removed nuts (and everything else he is allergic to).So its not a big deal if he gets nuts once in awhile (lie when my MIL gives him Honey NUT cheerieos, grr). I know others that can't even touch a peanut and if they do will swell up and have trouble breathing.

    Because peanut allergies are so common, the good news relative to other allgeries is that foods are well labled and if its a severe allaregy even note if they've been processes in a peanut free facility. Also most schools are peanut free.

    Did you also test for tree nuts, peas and beans?

    We don't have an epipen either.

  4. #4
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    No I don't know how severe. He had 1 bite of a pb&j sandwich and broke out into hives. He looked like he slept on a red ant hill within 5 minutes.

    We see the allergist next week for testing.
    Stay-at-home mom scratch cooking for a child with a severe peanut and mustard allergy.

  5. #5
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    what kind of jelly? could also have been the fruit as I've know several kids who break out in hives from strawberries.

  6. #6
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    Blackberry
    Stay-at-home mom scratch cooking for a child with a severe peanut and mustard allergy.

  7. #7
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    I can imagine how scary this is for you.
    It is sadly becoming a very common allergy so foods should be labeled well.
    If this becomes severe (some people are so sensitive that walking into a room where peanut oil has been used affects them), there is a new method to ramp up antibodies and though it never fully removes the allergy, it makes it less reactive.
    See your allergist and discuss it with him.
    Though nuts tend not to be outgrown, don't discount it. I was allergic to strawberries and eggs as a kid and outgrew that.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  8. #8
    My nephew has a peanut allergy. It was a similar situation, he had some pb on bread when he was about 14 months old and had a rapid and severe reaction. It is really hard, but you will learn all the coping mechanisns, and learn to read labels and make foods he can eat and carry an epi-pen and soon it will just become your way of life.

    My nephew is 10 now, and he is very aware of his allergy, and knows to ask questions. I remember when he was just learning to read, labels on food products were some of the first things he read out loud!

    Schools are aware these days, and most already have plans in place, which makes it easier!

    I know it is really really hard and overwhelming right now, but it will get easier.
    ______

    Elizabeth

    Walking Towards Wellness, my personal challenge to walk 10,000 steps per day in 2014 while living with and managing a chronic illness. Walk with me.

  9. #9
    I think I should give it a shot/go!

  10. #10
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    both reported

  11. #11
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    Thanks everyone.

    Elizabeth I'm TERRIFIED of him going to school. Thankfully he's only 1. I feel like I can control this at home and I'm sure we won't be eating out anytime soon but that is something I'm going to need to learn to do.

    It's incredibly overwhelming right now. I see the allergist next week. I've got about a million questions for him. I know this sounds so stupid but I feel like my baby is broken. He's not and this will just become a way of life for us but right now that's how it feels.
    Stay-at-home mom scratch cooking for a child with a severe peanut and mustard allergy.

  12. #12
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    Aw, he's not broken -- I know you know that -- he's just developing, which means that imperfections show up! Just wait until he's 2! I know what you mean, though. It's the first thing that's "wrong" and that's hard to take! Not your fault, mother, or his either. You have a great opportunity to learn a lot, here, and to pass it along, so he remains safe!
    Kay
    I'm a WYSIWYG person -- no subterfuge here!

  13. #13
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    We are all broken somehow....slights, illnesses, learning disabilities and even really smart people feel excluded and broken...it is just a path.

    They say people with allergies are actually better Their immune system is just TOO good, so it finds things that are not issues normally and reacts. They say people with allergies have less cancer and other diseases, so in a way, he is just better and more evolved, not broken
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by wallycat View Post
    We are all broken somehow....slights, illnesses, learning disabilities and even really smart people feel excluded and broken...it is just a path.

    They say people with allergies are actually better Their immune system is just TOO good, so it finds things that are not issues normally and reacts. They say people with allergies have less cancer and other diseases, so in a way, he is just better and more evolved, not broken
    Nicely said!
    Kay
    I'm a WYSIWYG person -- no subterfuge here!

  15. #15
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    Oh Wallycat thank you!!! That COMPLETELY made me smile!!

    He has a sister that's 2 1/2 that has had no allergies. I worry that he's gonna feel like "that kid" when he's older ya know?

    I always said if any of my kids had any type of eating issues that our entire family will adhere to the same diet the afflicted child needs (this came when my BFF's son was diagnosed as type 1 diabetic, she has things he can't eat but they can and I think that is just awful). We absolutely will so I hope that will help with him not feeling that way.
    Stay-at-home mom scratch cooking for a child with a severe peanut and mustard allergy.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jalapeno View Post
    Oh Wallycat thank you!!! That COMPLETELY made me smile!!

    He has a sister that's 2 1/2 that has had no allergies. I worry that he's gonna feel like "that kid" when he's older ya know?

    I always said if any of my kids had any type of eating issues that our entire family will adhere to the same diet the afflicted child needs (this came when my BFF's son was diagnosed as type 1 diabetic, she has things he can't eat but they can and I think that is just awful). We absolutely will so I hope that will help with him not feeling that way.
    You may want to rethink that at some time... he's not going to have that concession made for him in the outside world -- I can see why you'd want to have him be safe to eat anything at home -- but that may confuse him as he's learning to adjust... Just a thought.
    Kay
    I'm a WYSIWYG person -- no subterfuge here!

  17. #17
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    Yeah you might be right Kay.....I just don't know know. I'm all over the friggin road map right now.
    Stay-at-home mom scratch cooking for a child with a severe peanut and mustard allergy.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jalapeno View Post
    Yeah you might be right Kay.....I just don't know know. I'm all over the friggin road map right now.
    I'll bet you are! I'm so sorry. It was just something to think about down the road -- I didn't mean to add to your angst right now.
    Kay
    I'm a WYSIWYG person -- no subterfuge here!

  19. #19
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    Food allergies are so common that he will never be the only kid with an allergy. In my son's class of 12, at least 4 have food allergies (2 have very severe allergies, one student can't eat most foods and drinks a 'formula' for nutrition). When my son was diagnosed, he was excited since now he was like the other kids with food allergies (I think its because they get their own 'special' snacks).

    Don't worry about schools - they have it down. With admission there's always a food allergy paper to complete. Then there's usually a place in every classroom with notes posted withe kids who have allegies, what kind and what to do if they have an attack. Many schools also have a peanut free table for lunch or most are nut free. My son is 6 and he knows what he can and cannot have - he's evern starting to learn to read labels.

  20. #20
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    I've partially adjusted our meals for my son's allergies. Nothing on his list is that big deal to him (it would be different if he couldn't eat chocolate or candy). I don't make meals wiht peas in them anymore (my husband is happy about this one). For Asian meals I don't cook with peanut oil and for dishes that have nuts in them I just serve the nuts on the side. When we have fish, I give my son the chance to decide what he wants for dinner which he loves since most nights I won't allow him to have a seperate meal (he's a picky eater and would love to eat pizza or corn dogs every night).

    But as we see it and as I explain to my son, isnt it better to feel healthy without asthma and eczama than to be able to eat those foods. And I remind him about all the yummy foods he can eat.

    my son can't eat nuts, fish, peas, cantaloup

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jalapeno View Post
    Oh Wallycat thank you!!! That COMPLETELY made me smile!!

    He has a sister that's 2 1/2 that has had no allergies. I worry that he's gonna feel like "that kid" when he's older ya know?

    I always said if any of my kids had any type of eating issues that our entire family will adhere to the same diet the afflicted child needs (this came when my BFF's son was diagnosed as type 1 diabetic, she has things he can't eat but they can and I think that is just awful). We absolutely will so I hope that will help with him not feeling that way.


    At 2-1/2, his sister may not have allergies...yet. I hope she does not ever, but some allergies are inherited/predisposed, so just see how things go.

    I think your intentions are good, but your reality is still, as you say, all over the map.
    At 1 year old, you have A LOT of time to figure this out. And I agree, there are so many kids with allergies, ADHD, etc... that I don't think there is such a thing as "that kid" anymore.
    Right now you want to do all the right things, but there will be days when you will resent having to make such changes--it is natural. Remember that as he gets older, he will be able to take on more and more of the responsibility that comes with this.

    He can carry chewable benadryl, carry and epi-pen, and hopefully, never need any of it. The less nervous and scared you are, the more he will view it as no big deal, just a small difference. After all, every kid has preferences for food and avoidance of some things is so normal for kids, no one will consider him different.

    Talk to the allergist. See what happens in a year, and then go with the flow. Kids react to how we react, so keep that in mind. Having different food at dinner is fine and as someone said, you cannot isolate him from the real world...well, maybe at 1 or 4 years old you can, but then life steps in.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  22. #22
    A few tips for the future......always call ahead to restaurants to see if they use peanut oil. Always tell your server about a nut allergy. make sure any birthday parties he attends in the future that the hosting parents are aware of the allergy. Tell the airline when booking the flight about his allergy so they do not serve peanuts on that flight. Most food allergies affect people only on comsumption but peanuts are an airborne allergy & simply being in the room can cause a reaction, believe me I've made many a trip to the emergency room b4 epi pens.

    The good news is that people are much more sensitive about allergies today and will react accordingly.

  23. #23
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    it really depends on how severe the allergy is - cookncraze it sounds like your allergy is quite severe but many others with peanut allergies don't need to go to that level of avoidence.

    The peanut oil issue is my current frustration. 5 Guys and Chick Fil A both use peanut oil (we should cut back on fast food anyway but both places we didn't realize until after we ordered.

  24. #24
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    We have a family friend who has a peanut allergy. He wears a medical ID bracelet for it, and it is life-threatening. He's just six years old, and that kid is impressive! He knows to ask what is in something before eating, for example. He uses wipes to wipe down a table before he sits to eat at it. There was one instance where a girl was eating a PB&J on the other side of the room, and after eating, she asked if they could play. He said "yes, after you go wash your hands and use hand sanitizer".

    A peanut allergy is serious, but totally and completely manageable, and as your child grows with this allergy, he will learn to know the ins and outs better than you.
    Merry: I don't think he knows about second breakfast, Pip.
    Pippin: What about elevenses? Luncheon? Afternoon tea? Dinner? Supper? He knows about them, doesn't he?


    I'm food bloggin' almost daily at Tummy Treasure!

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Jalapeno View Post

    Elizabeth I'm TERRIFIED of him going to school. Thankfully he's only 1. I feel like I can control this at home and I'm sure we won't be eating out anytime soon but that is something I'm going to need to learn to do.

    (
    Aww, by the time he goes to school you will have years of allergy knowledge under your belt. You may need to educate and advocate for him to get the plan best suited for him (and you!) but by that time it will be second nature and you will know exactly what you are doing.

    He's still a baby, everything about him is new and you are just learning all his ins and outs, this is just another one of them.
    ______

    Elizabeth

    Walking Towards Wellness, my personal challenge to walk 10,000 steps per day in 2014 while living with and managing a chronic illness. Walk with me.

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