Community Message Boards
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Anyone use a waterpik?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    PA/ DE
    Posts
    4,741

    Anyone use a waterpik?

    DH has a space between two back molars that is wider than the others, and food often gets wedged inside. Some of the softer stuff, like lettuce, causes distress because when he uses dental floss or one of those plastic picks to try to remove it his gum becomes inflamed and sore.

    I'm thinking that a waterpik would be gentler in removing the debris, and would be good for him to use on a regular basis as well.

    Does anyone use one of these and would you recommend a certain brand? I think that I have also seen a type advertised that uses bursts of air rather than water. If I am correct, would that be a better (gentler) option than the water?

    Thanks for your advice!
    Vicci


    Can't you just eat what I put in front of you? Do you have to know what it is?
    Ria Parkinson, Butterflies (BBC, 1978-83)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Dadeville, AL
    Posts
    12,808
    I used a WaterPik a long time ago -- and it worked well for just what you say your DH needs. My dentist said that sometimes, it can drive the food further into the gum, but if used properly, it's a great tool! The one I had had an adjustable sprayer, so you didn't hurt the gums, as some are more sensitive than others.

    I've never heard of the burst of air one. I don't use it any more -- I found that the Hummingbird by OralB was good for me, and now that they don't make it anymore, I use a GUM flosser. But that wouldn't work for your DH because it's just floss, and sometimes, it does make my gums sore.

    HTH!
    Kay
    I'm a WYSIWYG person -- no subterfuge here!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Heading WEST!!
    Posts
    15,327
    I have not, but maybe this will help:

    J Clin Dent. 2012;23(1):22-6.
    Comparison of two power interdental cleaning devices on the reduction of gingivitis.
    Sharma NC, Lyle DM, Qaqish JG, Schuller R.
    Source

    BioSci Research Canada Ltd., Mississauga, Ontario, Canada.
    Abstract
    OBJECTIVE:

    The objective of this study was to compare the reduction of gingivitis by two power interdental devices combined with a manual toothbrush.
    METHODS:

    Eighty-two subjects completed this randomized, four-week, single-blind, two-group parallel clinical study. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two groups: Waterpik Water Flosser (WF) plus manual tooth brushing or Sonicare Air Floss (AF) plus manual tooth brushing. Subjects were provided written and verbal instructions for all products at the baseline visit and instructions were reviewed at the two-week (W2) visit. Data were evaluated for whole mouth, lingual, and facial areas for gingivitis and bleeding on probing. Plaque data were evaluated for whole mouth, lingual, facial, approximal, and marginal areas of the tooth. Gingivitis, bleeding on probing, and plaque were scored at baseline (BSL), two weeks, and four weeks (W4).
    RESULTS:

    Both groups showed significant reductions in gingivitis, bleeding on probing, and plaque from baseline for all regions and time points measured (p < 0.001). The WF group was significantly more effective than the AF group at reducing plaque and gingivitis at W2 and W4 for all areas measured (p <0.001). At W4, the WF group was 80% more effective than AF for whole mouth gingivitis reduction, and twice as effective for the lingual region. In terms of plaque removal at W4, the WF group was 70% more effective for whole mouth (50.9% vs. 30%), 60% for approximal area (76.7% vs. 48%), and 47% for facial (52.8% vs. 35.9%) surfaces. The WF was twice as effective for lingual areas and more than three times as effective for marginal areas vs. the AF group (p <0.001). Results for bleeding on probing showed the WF group was numerically better than the AF group for all areas and time points, with these improvements being statistically significance for whole mouth (p = 0.02) and facial area (p = 0.004) at W2, and for the facial area (p = 0.02) at W4.
    CONCLUSION:

    The Waterpik Water Flosser is significantly more effective than Sonicare Air Floss for reducing gingivitis and plaque.

    PMID:
    22435321
    [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Ga, USA
    Posts
    449
    I have the new sonic care air flosser and love it. It is quite powerful but I love the way it feels. I also use regular floss and am amazed at what still comes out when I use the air one (Gross I know)!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    7,938
    Has he tried a proxy brush? A proxy brush can be used anywhere as opposed to a Waterpik which is not likely to be used at the office, in public, etc.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    PA/ DE
    Posts
    4,741
    Wow, thanks for the advice everyone.

    Wallycat, that study was very interesting. I had only heard in passing of the AirFloss and wondered if it worked as well as a waterpik-type device would.

    Gumbeaux, I'm off now to google "proxy brush"...
    Vicci


    Can't you just eat what I put in front of you? Do you have to know what it is?
    Ria Parkinson, Butterflies (BBC, 1978-83)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Northern Michigan--waaay northern
    Posts
    2,367
    I just saw this thread, but wanted to pass on this product. I have gum disease, and this is the floss my dentist told me to use. It stretches to fit into tight spots, but puffs up to clean in larger gaps. It's also more effective, but gentler on my gums than any other floss I've used. I don't use the Crest branded one, but I imagine it's very similar (mine comes from my dentist).
    As the arc of history bends towards justice, it's a new, more progressive day. --Steve Benen, The Maddow Blog, 11-07-12

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    PA/ DE
    Posts
    4,741
    Looked at a proxy brush and, while very cool looking, it would probably be too "rough" for what my husband needs.

    Leebee, now that also looks interesting. I'll get some today when I'm out and have him try it. Thanks!
    Vicci


    Can't you just eat what I put in front of you? Do you have to know what it is?
    Ria Parkinson, Butterflies (BBC, 1978-83)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Grapevine, TX
    Posts
    1,018
    Quote Originally Posted by leebee View Post
    I just saw this thread, but wanted to pass on this product. I have gum disease, and this is the floss my dentist told me to use. It stretches to fit into tight spots, but puffs up to clean in larger gaps. It's also more effective, but gentler on my gums than any other floss I've used. I don't use the Crest branded one, but I imagine it's very similar (mine comes from my dentist).
    I was going to recommend this as well. I use it, too.
    Stacy

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Kenmore NY, near Buffalo
    Posts
    6,181
    Quote Originally Posted by leebee View Post
    I just saw this thread, but wanted to pass on this product. I have gum disease, and this is the floss my dentist told me to use. It stretches to fit into tight spots, but puffs up to clean in larger gaps. It's also more effective, but gentler on my gums than any other floss I've used. I don't use the Crest branded one, but I imagine it's very similar (mine comes from my dentist).

    My Hubby-man recently participated in a dental school study that used a rinse to combat gum disease, and the results were encouraging-- in future, we may be able to just swish for 30 seconds twice a day, before brushing, to regain oral health, or prevent problems.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    7,938
    Quote Originally Posted by VictoriaL View Post
    Looked at a proxy brush and, while very cool looking, it would probably be too "rough" for what my husband needs.
    It would take just a little pocket change to try it out. The problem with most kinds of floss is that it can can cut and irritate gums. A brush is soft and prevents this. I would try the smallest one you can find first.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    3,145
    DH just bought a water pic but I haven't used it yet. Our dentist said it was a really good idea but to be quite carefull about using the correct angle - not blasting into the gum but rather into the gaps between teeth. I'm going to try it tonight.
    Anne

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Tar Heel Country!
    Posts
    717
    I have used a water pick for about 30 years, started when I got braces in my early- to mid-20's to blow particles out of all that metal, it is very satisfying to see that stuff run out. My original one, a WaterPik brand, finally burnt up about 3 years ago, that baby was built to last and I loved that thing. The new replacement Waterpik sucks, doesn't flow well and is noisy as all get out, so tread carefully with that brand. They are great for flushing and stimulating gums, but as others have said, make sure whatever you get has some adjustments, your DH need to use low to med settings to not injure the gums. There is a version that attaches to your faucet, but it didn't seem workable for me. It doesn't replace flossing, but it's amazing what it can flush out. That airflosser sounds great, off to Google it. When did they come up with smart floss? That looks interesting.

    I had a GP once that, when I complained of a waxy ear that was plugged and hadn't been able to get to my ENT guys, was going to use a waterpik to dislodge the wax! Oh no he didn't! Great way to rupture an eardrum, no-longer-my-doctor.
    I'm a Tar Heel born, I'm a Tar Heel bred.....

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •