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Thread: Fool Proof

  1. #1
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    Fool Proof

    Does anyone have Ina's Fool Proof cookbook? I've been hanging out on Amazon this a.m. looking for an electric griddle and thought I'd add that book in too.

    Do you like the book?

  2. #2
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    I wasn't going to buy it, but saw it at Sam's yesterday and picked it up to take a look. Dh said just buy it, so I did. A quick glance and I found one recipe that I'm going to make tomorrow ... Green Beans Gremolata.

  3. #3
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    I went ahead and ordered the cook book and the griddle. Free shipping and the comfort of my home makes it way too easy!

  4. #4
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    I bought it when it first came out and wasn't too keen on it but I looked again and tried a few. So far have made these recipes....

    Chocolate Cassis Cake....love it! The fruit topping cuts the sweetness of the cake.
    Green Beans Gremolata...not a big hit with my family. It really sounded good but I don't think they loved it.
    Winter Minestrone & Garlic Bruschetta...so perfect for a cold winter Sunday. I loved it!

    This Saturday I'm going to have my first dinner that isn't family since my divorce. I think I'm going to try the slow-roasted filet of beef with basil parmesan mayonnaise, the mushroom & leak bread pudding with balsamic roasted brussels sprouts. Also, I'll make the chocolate cassis cake, an angel food cake and use the fruit topping for both.

  5. #5
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    I have all of her other books- I didn't get this one b/c I find that her recipes can get redundant so I wanted to wait... Curious to read reviews.

  6. #6
    I don't have the book but I have made two recipes from the book. The winter minestrone and the fennel and fig caponata. I loved both of them. Still likely won't get the book, though, but that's just me.

    Karen

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaryMac View Post
    I bought it when it first came out and wasn't too keen on it but I looked again and tried a few. So far have made these recipes....

    Chocolate Cassis Cake....love it! The fruit topping cuts the sweetness of the cake.
    Green Beans Gremolata...not a big hit with my family. It really sounded good but I don't think they loved it.
    Winter Minestrone & Garlic Bruschetta...so perfect for a cold winter Sunday. I loved it!

    This Saturday I'm going to have my first dinner that isn't family since my divorce. I think I'm going to try the slow-roasted filet of beef with basil parmesan mayonnaise, the mushroom & leak bread pudding with balsamic roasted brussels sprouts. Also, I'll make the chocolate cassis cake, an angel food cake and use the fruit topping for both.
    Sounds good! Thanks for the replies.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaryMac View Post
    ...This Saturday I'm going to have my first dinner that isn't family since my divorce. I think I'm going to try the slow-roasted filet of beef with basil parmesan mayonnaise, the mushroom & leak bread pudding with balsamic roasted brussels sprouts. Also, I'll make the chocolate cassis cake, an angel food cake and use the fruit topping for both.
    Good luck Saturday! Your menu sounds fabulous!! Don't forget to come back with some wonderful reviews

    ~Gail
    "I expect to pass through life but once.
    If, therefore, there be any kindness I can show or any good thing I can do any fellow being, let me do it now and not defer or neglect it, as I shall not pass this way again."
    -William Penn (1644-1718)

    ~~www.Nurse-Gail.com~~

  9. #9
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    Made the Green Bean Gremolata. Omitted the pine nuts and subbed fresh dill for the parsley. I also skipped the boiling & chilling steps and steamed the beans instead. I'll definitely make these again, but probably without the cheese next time. I combined the olive oil, garlic, and zest and let it sit at room temp for a couple hours then tossed it with the hot beans and added the dill and cheese.

  10. #10
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    This Christmas gift is my first ever BC book. With this weekend's sleet/ice storm (Friday, actually) keeping us kinda homebound, I cracked it open and tried a few things. Will be happy to post any recipes if anybody's wants them!

    1. Cinnamon baked doughnuts--these were good for breakfast on Sunday AM, and with my modifications, relatively healthy. DH thought he'd died and gone to heaven eating donuts for b'fast!

    2. Pumpkin spice cupcakes with maple frosting--Very good, easy, maybe a little sweet. The maple frosting was amazeballs.

    3. Brown rice and wheatberries--Had just found a new-style zipper bag of Lundberg's Calif. brown basmati rice on sale, so this was convenient. Lots of chew going on here, but I loved it as a side/starch with CL's Spicy maple pork tenderloin for Sat. night dinner. Loved using one of my new Coastal Blue LC pots for this as cleanup was very easy (using the almost Carolina Blue LC did not bring our Heels good luck Sat. night, tho).
    I'm a Tar Heel born, I'm a Tar Heel bred.....

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joanie B View Post
    2. Pumpkin spice cupcakes with maple frosting--Very good, easy, maybe a little sweet. The maple frosting was amazeballs.
    amazeballs?That's a new one on me.

  12. #12
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    I received the cookbook today, and after a quick flip through, I found several recipes I want to try. Free shipping and $15.00 dollars cheaper than in a store. I know, the book store shops. I also ordered an electric grill, therefore the free shipping.

  13. #13
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    On Barefoot Contessa today Ina made the Israelis Couscous with Tuna. It looked delicious! Here's a link to the recipe for those of you who don't have the book.

    http://projects.washingtonpost.com/r...nd-tuna-salad/

  14. #14
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    I borrowed the book from the Library. Have been reading through it and like the recipes. It is interesting to notice that she uses extra large eggs in all her recipes. Most of my baking recipes call for large eggs.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by madpots View Post
    I borrowed the book from the Library. Have been reading through it and like the recipes. It is interesting to notice that she uses extra large eggs in all her recipes. Most of my baking recipes call for large eggs.
    I only make her popover recipe, so I use four eggs because I buy large eggs..

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by madpots View Post
    I borrowed the book from the Library. Have been reading through it and like the recipes. It is interesting to notice that she uses extra large eggs in all her recipes. Most of my baking recipes call for large eggs.
    On one of her shows, she swore that this was the secret to her excellent baked goods - I'm not convinced. Anyway, I do buy x-large eggs for her baking recipes only, and I just use the rest for scrambled eggs etc.

  17. #17
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    I only buy large ... Eggland's Best cage free or the eggs at the farmers' market.



    Large Eggs vs. Extra Large Eggs

    Casey Barber


    I was planning on making one of the Barefoot Contessa’s recipes the other night when I noticed she called for three extra large eggs instead of three large eggs. I didn’t have any extra large on hand—what is the difference and should I be buying two sizes of eggs for my recipes?

    The short version is no, you shouldn’t be bothered with keeping two different sizes of eggs in your fridge unless you’re a baking maniac or a rabid Ina Garten fan. Large eggs are the baking standard, measuring about 2 oz. by weight. Extra large eggs weigh in at 2.25 oz. by comparison.

    Barely anyone but the Barefoot Contessa (who apparently has a major jones for the XL size; I have cooked probably one of her recipes in my lifetime, so I trust you readers to back me up on this) specifically calls for extra large eggs in their recipes.

    Pastry geniuses Dorie Greenspan, Gale Gand, Johnny Iuzzini, and the incomparable David Lebovitz all specify the large size in their recipes, as David explained to me, “In restaurants, large eggs are the norm (at least where I’ve worked), so many recipes tend toward large eggs.”

    Any volume issues caused by that additional quarter ounce found in an extra large egg really only come into play when baking, and even then pretty much only when the recipe calls for a lot of eggs. Subbing in a large for an extra large egg (or vice versa) in a recipe that only calls for a solo egg won’t make much of a difference.

    However, if you’re looking at a recipe for angel food cake, pot de crème, or another dessert that depends mainly on eggs for flavor and structure (and which calls for five or more eggs) then you can either stick to the recipe as written or make a slight adjustment based on the size eggs you’ve got in your fridge.

    Think of it this way: cracking 4 extra large eggs into a bowl gives you nearly the volume equivalent of 5 large eggs by weight (both will be hovering around 10 oz). So the recipe substitution would break down as:

    5 large eggs (10 oz) = 4 extra large eggs (9 oz) + 2 tbsp water
    6 large eggs (12 oz) = 5 extra large eggs (11.25 oz) + 3.5 tbsp water
    7 large eggs (14 oz) = 6 extra large eggs (13.5 oz) + 1 tbsp water
    8 large eggs (16 oz) = 7 extra large eggs (15.75 oz) + 1/2 tbsp water
    9 large eggs (18 oz) = 8 extra large eggs (18 oz)
    and so on.

    But let’s not get carried away with this substitution business. While a dozen jumbos could make for some deliciously oversized deviled eggs or super-duper omelets, I’d stick to buying whatever you’re used to unless you’re a conversion genius who has figured out how save a few pennies by subbing in fewer jumbo eggs for their large-sized counterparts.

    The bottom line is that it matters a whole lot less whether you’re using large or extra large eggs than you think. Again, listen to David Lebovitz: “For me, it’s more like what’s available or what people will likely have on hand.” So stop fretting, put down the calculator, and start baking.


    Source:
    http://www.goodfoodstories.com/2010/...ra-large-eggs/

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