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Thread: What is your favorite ethnic food to cook?

  1. #31
    I like this book for weekday,everyday meals.

    http://www.amazon.com/Quick-Easy-Tha.../dp/0811837319.

    I have a couple of her other books and like them too. Nancie McDermott.
    Carlin
    website:www.chefcarlin.com

  2. #32
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    I enjoy cooking different foods but my favorite would be Caribean specially from Puerto Rico & Cuba.
    The main difference would be we season our meats before cooking them plus rice beans plantains...
    I do love doing stir frys pastas etc

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by JuliN View Post
    LakeMartinGal -- I have saved them, however, because I am from Cincinnati, (German heritage city) and both my husband and I have German (Polish, too -- the borders kept changing) heritage.
    Juli

    Juli, do you eat goetta? I never knew that's what it was called until a few years ago. My dad made something he called German Gritz every winter and turns out it was actually goetta.

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by charley View Post
    Juli, do you eat goetta? I never knew that's what it was called until a few years ago. My dad made something he called German Gritz every winter and turns out it was actually goetta.
    Oh my, how could I ever forget Goetta? It has been so long that I had to refresh my memory at Wikipedia:

    “Goetta is a breakfast sausage of likely German-American origin that is popular in the greater Cincinnati area. It is primarily composed of ground meat (pork, or pork and beef) and steel-cut oats. Pronounced gétt-aa, ged-da or get-uh (Americanized pronunciation), this dish probably originated with German settlers from the northwestern regions of Oldenburg, Hanover,and Westphalia who emigrated to the Cincinnati area in the 19th century. The word "Goetta" comes from the Low German word götte.

    Goetta was originally a peasant dish, meant to stretch out servings of meat over several meals to conserve money.
    While goetta comes in a variety of forms, all goetta is based around ground meat combined with pin head or steel cut oats. Usually goetta is made from pork shoulder or "Cali", but occasionally contains equal parts pork and beef. Goetta is typically flavored with bay leaves, rosemary, salt, pepper, and thyme. It contains onions and sometimes other vegetables.

    While similar to scrapple in that it contains a grain product and meat for the purpose of stretching out the meat over several days, goetta looks very different. Scrapple is made with meal while goetta uses steel-cut or chopped oats. The oats in goetta are much coarser than the fine powder used in scrapple and add texture to the dish.
    Goetta is typically formed into small loaves, and then cut into squares and fried, often in the oil left over from browning the meats or in bacon drippings. Traditionally a breakfast food, goetta is often served with apple butter, ketchup, mustard, syrup, grape jelly, honey, or eaten by itself.

    More recently, goetta has become an all purpose food eaten with any meal. New goetta products in the Cincinnati area include goetta burgers, goetta dogs, and goetta pizza. As the meat in goetta is precooked during the process of making the loaves, goetta can be kept in the freezer.””

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by JuliN View Post
    LakeMartinGal -- I subscribe to this newletter for German cooking and perhaps you will enjoy it. Pasting in:

    http://www.kitchenproject.com/German...arch2-2013.htm

    I have yet to make any of these because I am working so many hours. I have saved them, however, because I am from Cincinnati, (German heritage city) and both my husband and I have German (Polish, too -- the borders kept changing) heritage. My DH has spoken of things his mother would make and they are similar (especially noodles) also, I remember my deceased father, who grew up still speaking German in the German Village section of Columbus, Ohio, talking about similar recipes, especially noodles and strudel.

    Hope this is interesting and helpful.

    Juli
    Thank you so much for that link! We lived in Cincinnati for 13 years, Columbus for 5, and I never got to German Village!! Sacrilege! I will look over those recipes to see if there's anything I can use now, or if I have to wait until I'm on maintenance with WW.
    Kay
    I'm a WYSIWYG person -- no subterfuge here!

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by JuliN View Post
    LakeMartinGal -- I subscribe to this newletter for German cooking and perhaps you will enjoy it. Pasting in:

    http://www.kitchenproject.com/German...arch2-2013.htm

    I have yet to make any of these because I am working so many hours. I have saved them, however, because I am from Cincinnati, (German heritage city) and both my husband and I have German (Polish, too -- the borders kept changing) heritage. My DH has spoken of things his mother would make and they are similar (especially noodles) also, I remember my deceased father, who grew up still speaking German in the German Village section of Columbus, Ohio, talking about similar recipes, especially noodles and strudel.

    Hope this is interesting and helpful.

    Juli

    Juli, thanks for sharing the link. The kasespatzle [sp?] is excellent. Friends of our daughter had us over for dinner and he made this dish for us when we were in Germany, and it was wonderful. !

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by JuliN View Post
    LakeMartinGal -- I subscribe to this newletter for German cooking and perhaps you will enjoy it. Pasting in:

    http://www.kitchenproject.com/German...arch2-2013.htm

    I have yet to make any of these because I am working so many hours. I have saved them, however, because I am from Cincinnati, (German heritage city) and both my husband and I have German (Polish, too -- the borders kept changing) heritage. My DH has spoken of things his mother would make and they are similar (especially noodles) also, I remember my deceased father, who grew up still speaking German in the German Village section of Columbus, Ohio, talking about similar recipes, especially noodles and strudel.

    Hope this is interesting and helpful.

    Juli

    Juli, thanks for sharing the link. The kasespatzle is excellent. Friends of our daughter had us over for dinner when we were in Germany, and he made this dish for us . Wonderful. !

  8. #38
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    Reported

    Quote Originally Posted by roiv000 View Post
    Hy

    chinese, indian,
    Kay
    I'm a WYSIWYG person -- no subterfuge here!

  9. #39
    Join Date
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    So far here are the results of our favorite ethnic food to cook/or eat. Here are the top 6.

    #1. INDIAN 14

    #2. ITALIAN 12

    #3. MEXICAN 9

    #4. CHINESE 8

    #5. GREEK 8

    #6. THAI 8


    RUNNER UPS

    #7. MOROCCAN 4

    #8. FRENCH 3

    #9. GERMAN 3

  10. #40
    Everyone of them is on my list.
    Wish we had a category of: "whatever the next one is"
    I love them all but can't stick with one all the time. That is why I bought my compact freezer.

  11. #41
    Join Date
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    I have had a couple of request to complete the list (from DH and me)

    So far here are the results of our favorite ethnic food to cook/or eat. Here are the top 6.

    #1. INDIAN 14

    #2. ITALIAN 12

    #3. MEXICAN 9

    #4. CHINESE 8

    #5. GREEK 8

    #6. THAI 8


    RUNNER UPS

    #7. MOROCCAN 4

    #8. FRENCH 3

    #9. GERMAN 3

    HONORABLE MENTION (2 PEOPLE)

    #10. England
    #11. Korean
    #12. Mediterranian
    #13. Middle East

    ALSO MENTIONED (1 PERSON)

    #14. Argentinian
    #15. Asian
    #16. Basque
    #17. Ethiopian
    #18. Israel
    #19. Slovakian
    #20. Szechuan
    #21. Malaysian
    #22. Spain
    #23. Ireland
    #24. Poland
    #25. Puerto Rico
    #26. Cuba

  12. #42
    Has to be French. I love everything that they love - wine, butter.....

    Others would be Indian, Korean, Japanese, Mexican. Well lets be serious - pretty much anything goes for me....as long as it tastes good

  13. #43
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    Mexican!! I grew up in So. Calif. We even had a Mexican deli a block away=HOMEMADE CORN TORTILLAS!!!! Now I'm in Oregon and I realize that the one thing I miss about home is the darned food!! Those little Mexican corner stands and the take-outs, and restaurants I often yearn to re-visit. Miss em. (Ok, I miss the SUN, too.)
    Edited to add: We mostly don't use cookbooks for Mexican. However, I have about 100 Mex cookbooks (and some Tex-Mex and etc.) and the one I actually have used is an old Ortho book...from the 70's. I use Mission tortillas, Bearitos refried beans (they taste the most like those I grew up with)...and for enchilada sauce, I like Hatch or Las Palmas. We also like Bush's chili beans (they are vegetarian) inside a flour tortilla along with some cheese, fried up like a taco. For tacos, I fry tortillas very very lightly, fill with meat, cheese, green chiles, onion, black olives, then I toothpick or clothespin them closed and fry again until cheese melts and outside is crisp. THEN, after last fry, fill with lettuce and tomato, and whatever. Hubby takes his at first fry of tortilla, fills and nukes. (He can't wait for second frying.)
    That is how my mom made tacos and would wrap the extras--fried with fillings--in tinfoil and I would ADORE them cold. Weird kid.
    PS: Taco meat: just fry hamburger with some ground cumin, salt and pepper. NO need for packaged seasoning. Never use it.
    Yum. Made me hungry just thinking about this.
    Last edited by catbatty; 03-10-2013 at 01:33 PM.

  14. #44
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    Thanks, glad both countries made the list

    Check out this weeks game. Game #83 will be Mexican and DCook, you can make Game #84 France if you are the first one to reply.

  15. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by cookieee View Post
    Thanks, glad both countries made the list

    Check out this weeks game. Game #83 will be Mexican and DCook, you can make Game #84 France if you are the first one to reply.
    Thanks for the invite but I have two teeny kids and a full time job - cooking games are not in the schedule right now! Maybe one day!

    Oh those tacos sound sooooo good

  16. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by DCook View Post
    Thanks for the invite but I have two teeny kids and a full time job - cooking games are not in the schedule right now! Maybe one day!

    Oh those tacos sound sooooo good
    YES! So happy I have made you sorta drool. haha Make enough for dinner and then make a ton more and wrap em and you have lots for next day when you don't have time to cook. Kids can help the prep and assembly. My invention: the clothes pins...after years of fightin with toothpicks. The clothes pins actually help with placing in frying pan and getting the hot tacos back out. I forgot to mention that I drain on paper towels all along the way with the corn tortillas. If you ever wanta make em, holler and I'll be happy to walk you through it.

    Catbatty Brenda

  17. #47
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    I just can't rank them - Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, Eastern European, Indian. That is the cooking side of things; eating out is (1) sushi and (2) Mexican. I think the common element on the cooking side is grains and vegetables. When we eat out I tend to go for things I don't fix at home. I adore sushi and sashimi for the subtlety of flavor and the beauty of presentation. Mexican flavors (not Tex-Mex) take me back to my childhood when I had to take a sink bath because corn shucks were soaking in the bathtub in anticipation of tamale prep the next day. If I ever go to Chicago it will be to worship at Rick Bayless' feet over a mole sauce.

    I think I love most ethnic cuisines because they embraced the locavore trend before it was a trend. Things really do taste best when they are grown close to home.

  18. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soupandstew View Post
    I just can't rank them - Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, Eastern European, Indian. That is the cooking side of things; eating out is (1) sushi and (2) Mexican. I think the common element on the cooking side is grains and vegetables. When we eat out I tend to go for things I don't fix at home. I adore sushi and sashimi for the subtlety of flavor and the beauty of presentation. Mexican flavors (not Tex-Mex) take me back to my childhood when I had to take a sink bath because corn shucks were soaking in the bathtub in anticipation of tamale prep the next day. If I ever go to Chicago it will be to worship at Rick Bayless' feet over a mole sauce.

    I think I love most ethnic cuisines because they embraced the locavore trend before it was a trend. Things really do taste best when they are grown close to home.
    Thanks, that is so interesting to know about soaking of the corn shucks. You might find DH at Rick's feet

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