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Thread: Turnip and Collard Greens

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Bowie, MD, USA
    Posts
    2,466

    Question Turnip and Collard Greens

    Hi!

    Does anybody eat these? If so, can you give me an idea what they taste like. Are they bitter? Do they taste like spinach? What?

    The Annapolis CL group was having a discussion about this and suggested we ask "the board."

    Thanks for your help.


    Shirley

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    495

    Post

    They are very southern and are delicious. Yes they are slightly bitter and most times served with vinegar sprinkled on them as a condiment.

    Most southerners cook them with meat drippings and cook them till they are very limp.

    These greebs are the consistency of cooked spinach and taste a little like that but they are more bitter.

    If you've never had them you should try them!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    905

    Post

    Shirley,

    I am a HUGE greens fan!!! I grow swiss chard (and turnips and utilize the greens by cooking and freezing)and love to experiment!! I know you asked about turnip and collard greens, but you need to know about other options.

    As a breakdown (and I'm NO expert), typically I blanch the greens in boiling water for 3 minutes before I do anything else with them. This helps to take out the "bitterness".

    And, yes, I know for a fact that what laden said about vinegar (although I've used balsamic vinegar) is wonderful with greens.

    They can all sort of resemble the taste of spinach. Depends on how they're cooked and prepared though. I have a great recipe for Jamaican Greens (that's what I call it). The Jamaican cookbook calls it Country Calaloo (SP?). It resembles turnip greens, so that's what I've used.

    Now, swiss chard is probably your closest to what spinach is like, and kale is more dense and the ends are "frilly" (very tasty) and turnips - when you cut them are actually a bit "prickly".

    They are all wonderful. I have never used any meat drippings for any of these. Please!! My advise to you is TRY THEM!!! You'll like 'em!!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Columbus, OH, USA
    Posts
    3,047

    Talking

    Hi, Shirley! I, too, am a big fan of greens: collards, turnip greens, mustard greens, kale, lacinato kale, etc., etc. Each type has a slightly different texture, but I'd say the regular "curly" kale is the firmest (followed by collards) and spinach and Swiss chard the tenderest (followed by turnip greens). As for bitter/sweet, Swiss chard is probably the blandest and either mustard greens or turnip greens the most "bitter" (actually, I'd say "sharp").

    The way I usually cook greens is to steam them in very little water, with a cut-up clove or two of garlic dropped into the water. At the end of cooking, I sometimes mash part of the cooked garlic and mix it in with the greens, but you can also just pick it out and discard it. The garlic gives the greens a slightly "sauteed" taste without any fat added, and also substitutes for the bacon or ham that many people use in cooking greens.

    By the way, once the greens are partly cooked this way, you can also drain them and throw them into stir-fries or soups. (Cooking greens in soup from the beginning might overwhelm the other ingredients unless they're pretty assertive themselves.)

    Happy eating!
    Phoebe

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,176

    Smile

    The last 2 years I have been growing collards, broccoli, carrots, peppers, lettuce, & radishes in my garden. I am glad to see some ideas for collards (never thought of asking that on here, duh!). I started to grow them because our Iguana (named Enik), eats huge bowls of chopped fresh vegetables-mostly collards each week. I haven't cooked them for my family yet but I will give them a try, AND because I have so much still! Thanks, Zinnia

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Tucker, GA, USA
    Posts
    207

    Post

    I have a wonderful way I love to cook greens called "Greens and Beans". I chop either Turnip or Collard Greens and saute them in good extra virgin oil olive and garlic for about 10 minutes. Then I add a can of Cannellini Beans (with Juice), some salt, pepper and a dash of crushed red pepper and let it simmer for another 10 minutes. Yummy!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Wilmington, NC, US
    Posts
    120

    Post

    Jeanne G.

    I would be interrested to see your recipe for Jamaican Greens.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    1,256

    Post

    Here in the south, we traditionally cook "greens" such as collards or turnip greens with ham hock or "streak of lean". However, to cut the fat, I use a smoked turkey leg. Gives the same flavor with less fat and grease (trust me, I can remember some greasy collards growing up, but man were they good!) My main tip is to be sure to wach them first. My Mom taught me to break collards leaves apart and soak them for about 1/2 hour in salt water and then rinse to "get the sand out".

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    108

    Post

    Have any of you tried the Kale-Cabbage Saute from the Aug. 2000 issue? I love all kinds of greens, however, my husband is less enthusiastic about them -

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