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Thread: Where should you raise bread dough?

  1. #1
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    Question Where should you raise bread dough?

    I hope this isn't a repeat. I tried to do a search first.

    What's the best place to put bread dough to get it to rise? I recently made bread and thought I put it in a warm place, but it didn't rise. I ended up putting it in the oven and it did fine.

    Is it okay to use the oven? Where else might be good? I was a little afraid that my rising dough might bake instead of rise.

  2. #2
    I use the oven with the oven light on. It generates enough heat to give the dough a toasty place to rise but won't bake it.

  3. #3
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    I make bread a lot. Here's my tip: When I am just in the starts of making the break, I'll turn the oven on, no higher than 200 degrees. I'll leave it on for 3-5 minutes then turn it off. Then I'll put the dough in to rise. You just have to make sure the oven isn't too hot, otherwise you'll start baking it!

    It works for me!
    Chris

  4. #4
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    I have also used the microwave since it's a nice enclosed space. I usually microwave a bowl of water for a few minutes to create a warm, moist environment, then remove the water when I put the dough in to rise.
    Alicia

  5. #5
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    Oven is fine

    I turn it on for 1 minute at 350, then turn it off. The slight heat makes it perfect for raising dough.
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  6. #6
    I do something similar to Diana, but just turn the oven to 350* and count to 15 and turn it off. I have noticed my bread rising much better there than when I had it on the counter.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    I truly believe that bread benefits from rising longer at a cooler temperature. I used to do the oven trick, then after reading lots of books on artisan bread baking, I tried to follow their method of letting the bread rise for double the time in a cool spot- like a basement or just covered on the counter. I truly notice a difference in the texture and flavor when I do a long cool rise.

    I thought that this would make bread baking more difficult (the extra time) but I just try to plan my day around it and do other things while it rises. I have also done an overnight refrigerator rise and it worked like a charm. Just have to bring it out of the fridge and get it back to room temp. before baking.

    Try it- I promise that you will notice a difference!

    -Becca

  8. #8
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    I've put mine on top of a running dryer. My laundry room is off the kitchen, so it is close by.

  9. #9
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    My technique is similar. I turn the oven on at lowest heat for one minute with oven light on. Turn oven off after 1 minute leaving light on. Although I must say I agree with Becca about the slow cooler rise.

  10. #10
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    Bloomfield Hills, MI, USA
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    I turn it on 400 degrees for one minute. then turn off the oven. no oven light in my oven. It's ancient.

  11. #11
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    In a happy, supportive family...

    Sorry. Couldn't resist. I put my oven on warm and then sit the bowl on the back burner near the vent and it is warm enough there. We keep our house at 60 degrees these days, so there isn't much other heat around!
    Last edited by Nirak; 01-15-2002 at 11:12 AM.

  12. #12
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    North Texas
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    I think something in my house makes my yeast go crazy. I often refrigerate dough overnight. However, when I open the refrigerator an hour or two later, it appears to already be doubled! It puffs up anywhere in the house I put it.

  13. #13
    I also did an overnight rise in the refrigerator and my dough went crazy! It was good though. Is that the way yours turns out Becca?

  14. #14
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    I am reading a book right now set in the early 1800's and they would take their starters to bed with them at night to keep them going. Hard to imagine!

  15. #15
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    Feb 2001
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    When I do an overnight rise and prolong the time that the dough will be rising- say 12 hours vs. 4, I forgot to mention that I always use less yeast than is called for. I do that because the longer time allows for more free yeast formation and gives a better flavor.

    -Becca

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