Community Message Boards
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Instant yeast vs. regular

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    7,844

    Instant yeast vs. regular

    I always use regular yeast when baking bread but notice more recipes calling for instant or rapid rise yeast. Can they be interchanged and if so how? I realize regular yeast is dissolved in water first while instant is adding right to the flour. Just want to know if I use regular instead of rapid rise.
    You think you're not ever going to be able to eat another thing, but alas, you will find yourself feeling strangely peckish around teatime. The more you eat, the more you want. That's the way it goes."

    Nigella Lawson

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    12,505
    I am not an expert, but I tend to use what the recipe calls for. However, if you have bread machine yeast, it is basically the instant (or rapid) yeast, just labelled differently. The only difference I am aware of is that this faster yeast only requires one rising.

    Here is some info from www.breadworld.com (I went on the Canadian site for your sake)


    Can Quick Rise and Bread Machine Yeast be used in Traditional recipes?

    Yes. Simply follow the One-Rise Method detailed on every package. For best results, add undissolved Quick Rise or Bread Machine Yeast to dry ingredients first. Add liquids and fat heated to 120to 130F. To use the traditional Two-Rise Method, add sugar to water before stirring in Yeast.


    Can Traditional be used in Quick Rise recipes?

    Yes, but with limitations. The Traditional has larger granules and it is necessary to dissolve completely for the yeast to work. Therefore, Traditional works best if dissolved in warm water (100 to 110F). To use the electric mixer method, combine yeast with 1/4 to 1/3 of the flour and other dry ingredients.


    What is the difference between fast-rising yeast (Quick Rise/Bread Machine Yeast) and Traditional Yeast?

    Quick Rise and Bread Machine Yeast are different strains than Active Dry Yeast. Quick Rise and Bread Machine Yeast are grown with a higher level of nutrients and are dried to lower moisture content. The particle size of Quick Rise and Bread Machine Yeast are finely granulated to allow complete hydration of the yeast cells during the mixing process. The Traditional Yeast larger particle size should be dissolved in water to achieve complete hydration prior to adding to the mixer. In addition, Quick Rise and Bread Machine Yeast contain ascorbic acid resulting in increased loaf volumes.


    So, the answer is yes. Here is a link directly to the page if you want more info http://www.breadworldcanada.com/tipsterms/faq.asp

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Oxford CT
    Posts
    758
    You can use regular yeast. Just make sure you dissolve the yeast in whatever liquid the recipe calls for. And I'd warm the liquid to at least 100 degrees.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    SO. CA
    Posts
    2,228
    The quick rise yeast works fine if you can convert your recipes
    (I use it for coffee cakes). You put part of the flour, sugar and yeast in the mixer bowl, mix it a few seconds, then you add the milk, butter which has been heated to 130 degrees. Then the egg. Mix, then add in the rest of the flour. If you can, log on to the Red Star or Fleischmann web page, and you will find recipes. I also have several pamphlets that I sent away to the yeast companies.
    In the breadmachine, I only use the quick rise if the recipe calls for it. Otherwise, use the Active Dry.
    Curleytop

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    7,844
    Thank you for all your advice everyone. I think I will try regular yeast in place of the rapid rise yeast called for- I can just add to the liquid ingredients. If my bread doesn't rise perfectly I know who to blame!!
    You think you're not ever going to be able to eat another thing, but alas, you will find yourself feeling strangely peckish around teatime. The more you eat, the more you want. That's the way it goes."

    Nigella Lawson

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •