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Thread: Kitchen Flooring. Tile or Linoleum?

  1. #1
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    Kitchen Flooring. Tile or Linoleum?

    I am going to be replacing the floor in my house to be. I'm leaning toward tile, however, are there any tips out there or reasons for doing otherwise. Hardwood would be very nice but more expensive (I'm guessing at this point) than I want to spend.

    TIA

  2. #2
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    My neighbors just have new lineoleum put in. They wanted tile, but would have been about $5000, the lineoleum looks like tile for about 1/3 the price.

    I don't know how much of an issue that is for you.

    I would imaginee tile would be much colder in the winter. Also, doesn't Pergo make a laminate that looks like tile?

    Leigh,
    who's DH would like to have a tile kitchen floor.
    "Mommy, Can we Please, Please, Please have spinach for dinner?" DD2(age 6)

  3. #3
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    I have always loved the look of tile and have dreamed of getting it. One bad thing (besides the cold factor) I have heard is unlike lineoleum, if you drop something that can break, it will break. Since it is a bit softer, I guess lineoleum is more forgiving. This is important to me since I do tend to drop things!!! Gina
    Change your mind, change your body

  4. #4
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    DH & I replaced a lineoleim floor throughout our hearth room and kitchen in our newly purchased house with tile...I love it. It is easy to maintain and yes it is cold in the winter but...that is where slippers come in handy. We seriously did consider wood but, the upkeep (none) and style of the tile made our decision.

    Good Luck!

  5. #5
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    wow...have fun....so nice to redecorate!!
    We had lin. or vinyl stuff and replaced it several times till finally, I said...I WANT PERGO!!! We love it. Easy to clean, looks like wood.
    I love the terra-cotta(sp?) tile look but thought it would be so much more costly (probably should have compared??!!) so we went with Pergo. It maches the living room, though the dining room has really nice bluish tile .
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  6. #6
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    I opted for linoleum. We're always barefoot, and thought tile would be cold. Linoleum's softer, so dropped stuff isn't as likely to break. Also, I've heard that tile, being harder, is harder on your feet and legs (ie, your legs feel tired faster). DH was also concerned that, with the aforementioned dropping of things, that not only would the stuff we dropped break, that the dropped stuff might also crack a tile.

    I'm very happy with my linoleum, but have friends who are happy with their tile. To each his own!

  7. #7
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    We have Pergo in our kitchen and I love love love it! It is beautiful and very easy to maintain. I am not sure what the pricing is (since it was already here when we moved in) but I bet it is less than tile, maybe a little more than linoleum.

    I would love to have our living room done to match the kitchen so that the whole downstairs has the same flooring (we live in a townhouse). Our little bathroom under the stairs also has Pergo. I think I will ask my FIL for Pergo in the living room and entry way for Christmas. Think he'll go for it?!

  8. #8

    Cool

    Just to give you a few more thoughts on the subject, I'm pretty sure there's an old thread on this, when someone was asking about tile versus wood versus vinyl. Unless that's one of the threads which disappeared into last winter's Void, it should still be there. (The consensus, in case you're curious, was tile-- though I as usual voted in the minority.)

  9. #9
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    One more consideration...

    I've read a couple of articles (can't remember where though) that said that tile is harder on your back/legs/feet if you spend a lot of time working in the kitchen. A long day of cooking could perhaps be more comfortable on a more forgiving surface. Of course, you could put a small rug in front of the work area to cushion your steps.

    Just another thing to ponder...

  10. #10
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    my brother-in-law just laid a cork floor in his kitchen! Definitely not for everyone, but he swears by it (and he's an architect).

  11. #11
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    I was going to say look at cork. I have walked on it in a display kitchen and really like it. It has a look very similar to hardwoods, but so soft and quiet. The natural one was priced about with mid-range tile.

    I have tile now, and I would not want this floor again. Part of the reason is that there is so much of it and it is white. It never seems clean, but a different color would make a lot of difference on that. It is also very hard, unforgiving and cold. That's fine in the summer, but in the winter, my feet get cold even with slippers and socks sometimes -- and I live in Houston! I had hardwoods in the last kitchen, and I hated the way they would dent if anything slipped or dropped, but loved the look.

    I saw an add this morning for Armstrong laminates that look like tile, but I have not seen them in person yet.

  12. #12
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    I'm with Beth in considering Armstrong. The ads say that it's much stronger than linoleum. I drop a lot of things and I think I would spend more time picking up pieces than cooking! Not to mention my kitchen floor can't go a week w/out a bath.

    Tile is hard, but it is easy to clean. So is linoleum...cork is very expensive, according to my GF who is building a house. I think if you made me choose right now I'd probably pick the Armstrong...

  13. #13
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    I have laminate flooring in my kitchen and love it. I didn't get the Pergo brand, as my flooring guy didn't have good things to say about it and won't sell it, but that's only what he said, so I don't know anymore than that. We have Congoleum laminate and I LOVE it! We have two dogs with nails that would scratch hardwood, and the turn-off about tile for me is the issue of the grout even more so than the fact that it's hard and cold. In every case I've ever seen, the grout gets SOOO dirty, particularly in the high traffic "paths", and is hard to keep sparkling clean, and I'm kind of anal, so I know that it would bug me every time I looked at it, and I'd probably end up scrubbing it with a toothbrush, which I have no desire to do. The laminate cleans up with just plain water - I have a mop that has these microfiber "pads" that velcro on. The microfiber material picks up every little speck of dog hair and crumbs. Then I shake that out (outside), and then I wet the pad with hot water, wring it completely out, re-velcro it to the mop, and then go over the floor. Because I use hot water, it dries in about 2 minutes (literally), and then I take the pad off, and throw it in the wash. I have 7 or 8 pads, so I usually do the floor every day - sometimes a couple times a day if it's rainy out and the dogs come in with dirty paws! , and then I do a load of rags once a week and throw all the dirty microfiber pads in at once. But it's sooo easy - no schlepping buckets of water, no rinsing and wringing out of a mop head repeatedly, no slopped water all over. 1, 2, 3 and the floor sparkles again. I'd get the laminate again in a heartbeat.

    On caveat - it is "loud". When you walk on it it's loud, as is when you accidentally drop something on it. But that doesn't bother me (although it might bother someone else).

  14. #14
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    How do you clean cork? I can't even imagine, I would think it would stain easily. The other features of it sound interesting, soft, warm, quiet.
    Peggy
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  15. #15
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    Thank You All for your tips and input. I'm so glad I asked the question. I'll be checking out all these different options in the next month or two. In fact there is a Home Show this weekend which I hope to get to and perhaps they will have displays there. It will be a good place to start besides, off course, here!

  16. #16
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    I am a tile fan, which is good since that's what I'm going to get! I'd love hardwood, but that's a "some day" kind of wish.

    Natasha

  17. #17
    Originally posted by Beth
    It is also very hard, unforgiving and cold.
    Not to digress, but am I the only one reminded of "When Harry Met Sally" by this thread?

    No, not once. It's just a cold, hard, Mexican ceramic tile...

    Maybe you guys think I'm nuts?

  18. #18
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    From the samples I've seen, the cork has a very think layer of sealer on it. So I don't think you really have to worry about stains. It's available in tiles or tongue and groove strips. It's also available in a ton of different colors, patterns, shapes, etc.

    DH wanted it in our last house, but it just seemed a bit too different for me. Although I love the look of bamboo hardwood. Has anyone seen that. VERY COOL! And it is a renewable resource as they don't have to kill the tree to harvest the "wood".

  19. #19
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    My vote is for tile...I just replaced my Armstrong vinyl floor last summer. I couldn't wait to get rid of it! But, we had a seam in the middle of the kitchen - the downside of vinyl.

    I have a white kitchen but chose a tile with some color and find it easy to keep clean - even with a dog in and out all day!

    But tile is hard and I shattered a glass into a million pieces not long after having the tile put in - so I'm extra careful!

    I don't have a problem with it being too cold for us which was a concern I had.

    Good luck - looks like you have a lot to think about!

  20. #20
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    Hey there Jazzcat,

    We're in the research mode of kitchen remodel right now, and we just spent the last weekend nosing around every flooring place in the Lehigh Valley. Here's what we have surmised:

    - We currently have linoleum in our kitchen and one bathroom. We don't like it. The kitchen is a light color and shows dirt immediately. If you drop something on it, the resulting dent or tear will become a nook for dirt to collect in.
    - We have ceramic tile in our foyer, and it is beautiful and easy to clean. It is also very cold and very hard. Nice for a small area like a foyer where you don't spend alot of time standing in one place, but I would hate to imagine what my ankles and knees would feel like after a Thanksgiving cooking marathon .
    - We thought we wanted Pergo. It is really expensive, difficult to install (or you can pay someone a couple thousand dollars to install it) and has (in our opinion) limited tile-look options.
    - Turns out, just about every flooring manufacturer has jumped on the laminate flooring bandwagon, and now there are a ton of options other than Pergo. We particularly like a brand called Quick-Step which makes a product called Clic-Loc. It is similar to Pergo, but the installation does not require the complicated glueing process. Pro: DH can install this himself, looks beautiful, and has a 25 year wear warranty. Con: Gluing the flooring together enhances the water resistance of the floor, an important point to consider in a kitchen. Congoleum, Mannington, Armstrong, and others also make laminate flooring.
    - Congoleum also makes a product called DuraStone. This is a linoleum-type product which is made of crushed stone which is applied to the tile. It is supposed to be much stronger and wear resistant than regular linoleum. It also comes in a wide variety of finishes (terracotta, ceramic tile, tumbled marble, quartz) and looks very nice.
    - And as previously mentioned, cork is also something to consider. It comes in a wide variety of finishes, you can get a finish that looks like tile, but the natural cork patterns are very pretty, too. DIYers can install this, and it is supposed to wear well. There is a laminate-type sealant on the cork that gives it water resistance and wear/tear protection.

    There are probably other choices out there, but we were exhausted after several intense flooring days. We are either going with the Clic-loc or the cork (and DuraStone is still in the running, I think), depending on what looks nicest with our cabinet/countertop selections.
    A dog is not "almost human" and I know of no greater insult to the canine race than to desribe it as such.
    - John Holmes

  21. #21
    I grew up with a tile floor in my mom's kitchen.

    As others have said:
    *It's beautiful
    *It's easy to clean (although choose your grout color carefully and seal it!)
    *Stuff you drop on it will break (many juice glasses and several plates met their end this way in our kitchen)
    *It's nice and cool in the summer
    *It's cold in the winter if you go barefoot or wear thin socks (if you have $$ to spend, you can get under-floor heating, which sounds dreamy to me)

    BUT... also as others have said... it is extremely hard on your feet and back, especially if you stand at the sink or stove for long periods of time. Tile has no give whatsoever. My back and my heels used to hurt so bad after doing the dinner dishes! My mom had the same complaint.

    Solution: buy several of those thick cushioned mats for your work areas. Not just a throw rug, but a mat. At my mom's house, there's one at the sink and on at the stove. No more complaints. I just wonder why it took so many years for us to figure that out!

  22. #22
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    I've had linoleum and I have had hardwood, and nothing beats hardwood, IMHO, in the kitchen. It's easy on the back and comfortable to stand on. We did do ceramic tile in all the bathrooms and laundry rooms, and we love it there. I would have someone quote prices before you make your decision. Depending on the size of the area, it may not be much of a difference in the final cost.

    My sister and BIL installed Pergo a couple of years back (themselves) and love it. It looks nice too.

    Just remember that although any floor may seem expensive, if you figure out how long you plan to live there, it may not be so much in the end. A floor is not something you change every couple of years.

  23. #23
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    I bought a very good brand of linoleum for our kitchen. It wears well and is easy to clean. Tile is very pretty, but I drop EVERYTHING so that's out of the question. I have had very few things break on the linoleum floor. With a little baby crawling around mom's feet, that's pretty important. Also, with tile comes grout. I don't clean grout!

  24. #24
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    I just thought of this...I can't believe I almost forgot this.

    Carpeting! When I was a kid our kitchen was always carpeted. My Dad owned a carpet store and didn't start carrying Armstrong until I was a teenager, I'd put it in again, but DH= won't go for it.

    Pros- easy on the feet and back
    almost nothing breaks when dropped
    quick vacuuming is all it needs

    Cons- when you do drop something you better hope
    whatever it is is empty

    I am a pretty neat cook and so is most of my family and I'm sure this is the reason why.

    Just another option...it works for some people.
    Peggy
    ...Wag more
    Bark less

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